connecting seas

anonymous asked:

Do you know of any rituals/spells/etc to connect someone (or even an object) to the ocean?

Dunk it in sea water? Lol.

Sorry I’m an ass sometimes. 

You could honestly do it with an [energy tether], but focus on the connection aspect instead of sharing energy.

… Okay, fine.

Connect Yourself to the Sea 
(A Knot Magic Spell)

Get a bowl, and some shells if you have them; if not, crystals that remind you of the sea work. A jar of sand could prove useful too, you know. Add some sea water to the bowl - if you have it, or a mixture of tap water and sea salt suffices.

Grab a piece of string, long enough to wrap around your wrist once and still have excess hanging - blue or white is preferred, but pick whatever color makes you think of the sea. Put this in the bowl of sea water, making sure the water soaks in to the string completely. Wrap one end around your left wrist; hold the other end in your non-dominant hand, and point it towards the nearest ocean. Say / think something like:

Even though distance separates, I am connected to the sea.
Though my ears do not hear your waves, I feel them in my soul.
Though my feet do not grace your sands, they ground and comfort me wherever I go. 
Though your waters do not dampen my skin and hair, I carry water within me at all times.
I am human, and water; I am one with the sea.

(Idk, I just wrote something off the top of my head, I’m not a sea witch man. Modify this however you want, or write anything to suit your needs, or don’t if you can really focus on being bonded and forever linked to the ocean on your own.)

Really focus on that connection to the sea; if you need to, close your eyes and do a visualization / meditation of you being at the sea as you do this, to further enhance that. Imagine connections from the ocean into your body. Feel the ocean all around you, and inside you. Do whatever you need to, to enforce that feeling of connection within yourself.

When done, make a bracelet out of the string and wear it as long as you can. Repeat as necessary (i.e, if you need to take the bracelet off for whatever reason or it breaks).

For an object: tie the string to an object instead, preferably one that won’t be harmed by salt or water, because, you know; change the chant to suit your needs, or again opt it out if you don’t find it necessary.

Aphrodite/Venus

Originally posted by all-the-ways-things-are

Small devotional acts. (Of self and platonic love)

  • Wear cozy/comfy clothes
  • Listen to music that makes you feel empowered
  • Sing along to your favorite songs
  • Give little gifts to your friends
  • Go for an evening walk
  • Sleep in when you can
  • Bring more gentle colors into your life
  • Clean your room and let some fresh air in
  • Drink tea with honey 
  • Visit the ocean or find some ways to be connected to it (sea salt, seashells, etc.)
  • Write a letter to your future self or one to her
  • Glitter!
  • Go to a store and try on some new clothing styles
  • Leave positive notes in random places
  • Change your look every once and a while
  • Treat a friend to some drinks/dinner
  • Don’t limit yourself and your style because of stereotypes
  • Support small businesses
  • Take a day off and do whatever you want
  • Watch some cute animal videos
  • Visit a garden
  • Go on a picnic
  • Stand up for those who need it
  • Buy yourself some flowers
  • Be there for your friends
  • Eat those extra sweets
  • Wear more makeup/jewelry if it makes you feel nice
  • Compliment people more
  • Try out some new face masks
  • Take more selfies and pictures (by yourself and with friends)
  • Enjoy floral scented things
  • Go to a movie by yourself
  • PRACTICE LOVING YOURSELF
  • Many, many, many other things not said here
Sea Witch’s Protection Jar

If you have access to the sea, this spell can be used to protect your home or any other area. All you need is a jar with a lid. Mason jars are ideal.

Take your jar to the beach, and walk around a bit. Put a little sand in the bottom, and a few other interesting objects. Shells, stones, whatever calls to you.

Fill the jar to the brim with sea water and seal it. Visualize the jar as connected to the sea. Sea water is always sea water. It knows where it came from, and no matter how far you remove it, it remains connected to a source of nearly limitless power. You have the sea in a bottle. The whole sea.

Now take the jar home, and bury it at the entrance to your home. Visualize as you do, the power of the sea washing all negativity away from all who enter, washing it through the bottle and out into the sea.

Sea cucumbers are undoubtedly one of the stranger animals on our planet, and Pokémon seems to have outdone themselves with Pyukumuku. There’s about 1,720 different species of sea cucumber on Earth, living in a variety environments from shallow shores like Pyukumuku to the depths of the ocean.

To properly appreciate these creatures, we need to examine their anatomy. Sea cucumbers are echinoderms, sharing their phylum with starfish, sea urchins, and sand dollars. Sea cucumbers have no brain, but they still have a rudimentary nervous system. They have a sense of touch through their skin, so they can feel around and sense the presence of light (through warmth), but otherwise have no sensory organs: no eyes, no noses, no ears, and so on.

So, the spots on Pyukumuku aren’t eyes at all, they’re simply markings. Many animals including fish, reptiles, birds, and insects sometimes have eye-like patterns on their skin, which are meant to confuse predators into thinking their face isn’t really their face. More on that in a moment. First, let’s check out the inner anatomy of sea cucumbers:

Sea cucumbers move around using little tube feet, which use hydraulic pressure to push the sea cucumber along like a slug. They don’t have lungs or gills like a fish, but rather have respiratory trees which work similar to gills: They pump water through the tree, which takes out the oxygen for breathing. Strangely enough, the respiratory tree is not connected to a sea cucumber’s mouth but rather their anus, which pushes the water through the tree. A sea cucumber breathes through their anus. 

On the opposite sides of their body is the mouth, surrounded by a bouquet of tentacles which are used to gather up food (typically plankton or algae) and push it into their mouth, similar to what lips or our tongues do for us. Looking at Pyukumuku, this tuft of tentacles is at its far end: that’s not a tail. So its mouth is on the opposite side of its eyespots. As I said, eyespots are meant to distract predators away from a creature’s true face, which means that we are looking at Pyukumuku’s anus.

It is certainly an effective method of defense. Would you want to attack something that shoots its own intestines out of its butt? If you want further proof that we are looking at Pyukumuku’s anus, you just have to examine it’s ability Innards Out. When Pyukumuku faints – when it is threatened like a sea cucumber, it will do damage to it’s foe by expelling its inner organs. Of course, the lovely Pyukumuku does this to damage its opponents even before it faints in battle.

Originally posted by maskedkitsune

The inside of a creature is usually very vulnerable, which is why in most creatures the insdies are kept on the inside. Luckily, sea cucumbers have incredible regeneration abilities, able to quickly regrow entire organ systems inside their bodies if something happened when they spit them out.

Of course, its not their only method of protection. Many species of sea cucumbers are also covered in spines (like Pyukumuku) which offers them further protection against predators. 

And if you’re concerned about feeding Pyukumuku those pokébeans from the wrong end, rest assured: although sea cucumbers eat primarily with their tentacles through their mouths, they can also absorb nutrition through their anuses. Some sea cucumber species will filter out algae when they breathe with the anuses, absorbing the food in the process. It’s efficient, if nothing else.

Pyukumuku is a sea cucumber, which expels its inner organs through its anus to fight off predators. 

Spring Day Theory 🌼

As the Spring Day teaser was released today I thought I’d create a study for you guys putting forward my observations as a Creative Writing and literature graduate, please enjoy… *puts smart hat on*

Omelas

A plotless work by Ursula K. Le Guin based solely on description and allowing the reader his own interpretation of morality and philosophy. The only chronological event in the piece is the first day of summer in a euphoric utopian city named Omelas, an extended metaphor for youth, with a vibrant festival atmosphere which we see in the teaser within the Omelas motel in bright rich colours as they all live communally just like the people within the text.

The reader is intended to remain unsure about the reasoning behind this ambiguous world which is left completely up to interpretation, confirmed by the writer in their own words: “Omelas sounds in my words like a city in a fairytale, long ago and far away. Perhaps it would be best if you imagined as your own fancy bids.”

The central point which makes the story real is its single atrocity, the suffering of one child in filth, darkness, and perpetual misery.

Once old enough to know the weight of this suffering, a group of young and old individuals walk away silently seen in one of the scenes as each member walks together into a new environment, evident due to the drained hue of the cinematography as it becomes more wintery, seen too in the opening shot in which the members have frosty blue tinged lips juxtaposing the background of bright childhood sights like the merry go round reading “you never walk alone” as well as the beach which show a stylized divide between them and their surroundings. 

Jimin’s scenes are most notable with the most enduring being his connection to the sea, a theme which sets forth a contradictory metaphor as old as classical literature itself, of the ocean as a serene, beautiful yet dangerous and hostile environment. This idea is supported by Jimin holding another persons shoes in his hands, typically the first thing to wash up after a death by drowning at sea.

It is arguable that Jimin later walking alone in an apparent wilderness is symbolic of the book endings ambiguity and potential as a blank canvas on which the personal meaning from the readers imagination can be applied. Once again the writer confirms this: “The place they go is even less imaginable to us than the city of happiness. It is possible it does not exist.”

This could hint that the characters have no further plot line, they are without a continuing story arc, supported by the imagery within the teaser of each member repeating his own theme as oppose to developing.

The notion of the scapegoat is central to the understanding of the text, the writer being heavily influenced by psychomyths alluded to by Dostoyevsky and William James. In a nutshell that no matter the happiness we felt in a society that hinged on the suffering of one, our happiness would be so monstrous to us that we would be forced to leave it by our own conscience.

No Vacancy

About 7 friends on a road trip staying at a motel, encountering a seemingly helpful group and being trapped, waking up to a gruesome and bloody terror they must work together to escape and survive.

There is a huge possibility that the other group is a mirror image of the 7 friends whose own actions put them in danger, causing them to have to work together to overcome the consequences, it can also be used to explain some of the dark and bloody themes seen in Wings, Epilogue and I Need U era.

Owl Service

A supernatural fantasy written by Alan Garner set in modern Wales and based on a mythical Welsh woman named Blodeuwedd who was created by flowers for a man cursed to take no human wife. She betrays the husband for another man and is turned into an owl as punishment, a future theme eerily hinted at in the sign at the bus shelter (which oddly has no exit roads) at the destination aptly named ‘Affair’.

In Garners tale 3 teenagers find themselves re-enacting this story, whose bird imagery relates directly to Taehyung’s portrayal in Wings and the mythology and classical themes set forth in the previous era.

Conclusion

It is imperative we ask ourselves the forbidden question, what if none of this is real? What if what we are seeing is just a narrative device created to obscure the real story? What facts would this leave us with?

Well…

The central fact is the reflected suffering of a young person – escaping into his books and movies to distract himself from the truth, a truth so all-encompassing that it bleeds through into every single thing he reads and watches. An individual who was well versed in classicism and philosophy, of high intelligence to keep noticing these themes and applying parts of his own life to generate meaning. 

The ‘hyung’ Tae calls for yet never gets through to after the fact, doomed to repeat and suffer that which he cannot change, the events of his youth refracted in what he reads, so many variations of books and films all mixed together and all in English, overlapping and still somehow alien from each other, yet in each he sees his friends as well as himself as the protagonists, that child would be the central theme, the scapegoat, the utopia, the one individual which knits it all together. 

The view of this one man would perceive all the events, know the suffering of each character as only an omniscient narrator would, how else would he know both the suffering and the joy simultaneously unless the characters were all a part of him, each one a strength and a weakness.

With this view, only the events during I Need U could have been real, the rest simply memories, reflections and glimpses into his imagination as he goes about his life, revisiting a now distant, traumatic yet halcyon past.

Who do you think he is? I hope you enjoyed my mini case study of the new teaser! If you would like any more theories I welcome asks! 💖

Written by Laura Cathrine. 🎀

rebelcaptain || Splash AU

↳ Or the one time they are at the beach and don’t die

Twenty years ago, 10-year-old Jyn Erso was vacationing with her parents near Cape Cod. During a site seeing tour, Jyn, fascinated by the ocean, falls in even though she cannot swim. But before she can drown, a hand grasps hers–the hand of a boy of the sea. Their connection is instant the moment they touch, and suddenly Jyn can breathe underwater. But before either of them can understand what is happening, Jyn is pulled out of the water by her parents, Galen and Lyra, relieved that she seems perfectly fine. 

Jyn comes to believe that this event was a hallucination, and tries to go on with her adult life. And while she finds success in business (she runs a business with her adopted brother, Bodhi), her personal life is a disaster because her bond with the merman he met as a child was so strong that the connection to all other men pales in comparison.

Wanting to do something about this, Jyn returns to Cape Code where she meets Dr. Orson Krennic, an eccentric scientist who believes in the existence of merpeople. Jyn travels out onto the ocean with him and when left alone at the motor, she is knocked out and falls into the ocean when she is hit in the head with a sail.

No arms pull her out of the water this time, but she is still alive, and awakes to find herself on the beach, watched over by a dark-haired merman. It’s the boy who saved her as a child grown into a handsome man. The boy, Cassian, kisses her and dives back into the ocean.

Under the sea, Cassian cannot stop thinking about Jyn, and finding her drenched purse, finds out where she lives in Manhattan. The police encounter literal fish-out-of-water Cassian–who on dry land has legs–and guide him into Jyn’s care, thinking he is somehow related to her. 

Despite the oddity of his behavior, Jyn takes him in and it’s only a matter of hours before they fall in love again. But trouble is on the horizon. Cassian can only stay out of the ocean for two weeks before he must return or die–and Krennic is after him, ready to expose his real form and desiring to dissect him to learn more about merpeople. 

When the authorities take Cassian into custody due to his non-human status, Jyn is shocked to realize his true nature, and is ready to swear off love for all time. But Bodhi lashes out at her, making her come to her senses and making her realize how much she loves Cassian and has always loved him. They hatch a plan, and together, Jyn adn Bodhi rescue Cassian before he can be harmed.

Safely returning Cassian to the ocean, he tells Jyn that he loves her and tells her that she can survive underwater, too, as long as they are together. Jyn, realizing he is the same boy who saved her as a child, decides to join him, even though it means she can never return to land.

Hugging Bodhi goodbye, Jyn strips off her jacket and follows Cassian into the sea to live out the rest of their lives together.

4

After coming back from Iceland I have a few new items in my shop!


tiny sea witch altar - available on ETSY

This kit is both for those who are land-locked and who live by the sea. It was put together from materials I’ve gathered during my travels. When used for meditation it will help you connect with the sea and draw from its power.

Keep reading

The Updated Books and Resources Master Post

I’ve done my best to categorize and organize the titles according to subject matter. 

- Some of these titles have Wiccan influence. 

- Certain authors are not 100% reliable for information (DJ Conway, Silver Ravenwolf are some examples).

I hope you find this list to be helpful and resourceful as you develop your own beautiful practice!

-M

* indicates a pdf file or ebook.

Astrology:

  • The Rising Sign by Jeanne Avery*
  • Do It Yourself Astrology by Lyn Birkbeck
  • The Practical Astrology by David Christie-Murray
  • The Ultimate Book of Relationships by Clare Gibson
  • The Ultimate Birthday Book by Clare Gibson
  • Linda Goodman’s Love Signs by Linda Goodman*
  • Linda Goodman’s Sun Signs by Linda Goodman
  • Darkside Zodiac by Stella Hyde
  • Darkside Zodiac In Love by Stella Hyde
  • The Astrology Kit by Grant Lewi and Liz Greene
  • The Astrology Yearbook by Loan Moore
  • The Guide to Astrology by Lori Reid

Book of Shadows/Grimoires:

  • The Azoetia: A Grimoire of the Sabbatic Craft by Andrew Chumbley*
  • Cunningham’s Book of Shadows: The Path of an American Traditionalist by Scott Cunningham*
  • The Gardnerian Book of Shadows by Gerald Gardner*
  • Witch’s Master Grimoire by Lady Sabrina*
  • The Complete Uncut Book of Shadows by Riders of the Crystal Wind*
  • The Alexandrian Book of Shadows by Sekhet Sophia*

Crowley/Thelema:

  • The Book of the Law by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Book of Thoth by Aleister Crowley*
  • Book 4 by Aleister Crowley, Frater Perdurabo, and Soror Vira*
  • Book 4 Part 1: Meditation by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Confessions of Aleister Crowley by Aleister Crowley*
  • Diary of a Drug Fiend by Aleister Crowley*
  • Duty by Aleister Crowley*
  • Eight Lectures on Yoga by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Equinox by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Equinox of the Gods by Aleister Crowley*
  • Goetia of Solomon the King by Aleister Crowley*
  • Household Gods by Aleister Crowley*
  • Invocation of Hecate by Aleister Crowley*
  • Liber CVI (Book 106): Concerning Death by Aleister Crowley*
  • Liber 777 and Other Qabalistic Writings of Aleister Crowley by Aleister Crowley*
  • Liber LXXXIV vel Chanokh by Aleister Crowley*
  • Little Essays Towards Truth by Aleister Crowley*
  • Magick in Theory and Practice by Aleister Crowley*
  • Magick Without Tears by Aleister Crowley*
  • Moonchild by Aleister Crowley*
  • Olla by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Tao The King by Aleister Crowley*
  • The Vision & the Voice With Commentary and Other Papers: The Collected Diaries of Aleister Crowley by Aleister Crowley, Victor B Neuburg and Mary Desti*
  • Abrahadabra: Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thelemic Magic by Rodney Orpheus and Lon Milo Duquette*

Crystals/Gems:

  • Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic by Scott Cunningham*
  • Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery: Using Stones for Spells, Amulets, Rituals and Divination by Gerina Durwich  
  • Crystal Prosperity by Judy Hall

Divination/Psychic Ability:

  • Crystal Awareness by Catherine Bowman*
  • Solitary Seance: How You Can Talk with Spirits on Your Own by Raymond Buckland
  • The Spirit Book: The Encyclopedia of Clairvoyance, Channeling, and Spirit Communication by Raymond Buckland
  • How To Read Palms: Understanding Personality and Personal Destiny through Palm Reading by Maria Costavile*
  • Psychic Self-Defense: The Classic Instruction Manual for Protecting Yourself Against Paranormal Attack by Dion Fortune
  • Complete Illustrated Book Of The Psychic Sciences by Walter B. Gibson and Litzka R. Gibson*
  • You Are Psychic: The Art of Clairvoyant Reading & Healing by Debra Lynne Katz*
  • The Intuitive Arts on Love by Arlene Tognetti and Lisa Lenard*
  • Spirit Allies: Meet Your Team from the Other Side by Christopher Penczak
  • The Witch’s Shield: Protection Magick and Psychic Self-Defense by Christopher Penczak
  • The Other Side of the Mind by w. Clement Stone and Norma Lee Browning*
  • The Complete Book of Palmistry by Joyce Wilson

Gods and Goddesses:

  • Maiden, Mother, Crone: The Myth and Reality of the Triple Goddess by D.J. Conway
  • Dictionary of the Gods and Goddesses by Michael Jordan*
  • Encountering Kali: In the Margins, At the Center, IN the West by Rachel Fell McDermott and Jeffrey Kripal*
  • Singing to the Goddess: Poems to Kali and Uma from Bengal by Rachel Fell McDermott*
  • The Magic of Kali: Inner Secrets of a Tantrik Goddess by Michael Magee*
  • Buddha, Christ, and Merlin: Three Wise Men for Our Age by Christopher Penczak
  • Goddesses and the Divine: A Western Religious History by Rosemary Radford Ruether*

Herb/Nature Magick:

  • Occult Medicine & Practical Magic by Samael Aun Weor*
  • The Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews by Scott Cunningham*
  • Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham
  • Earth, Air, Fire & Water: More Techniques of Natural Magic by Scott Cunningham*
  • Earth Power: Techniques of Natural Magic by Scott Cunningham*
  • The Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham*
  • Cottage Witchery: Natural Magick for Hearth and Home by Ellen Dugan*
  • Seasons of Witchery: Celebrating the Sabbats with the Garden Witch by Ellen Dugan*
  • Herbal Magick; A Witch’s Guide to Herbal Enchantment, Folklore, and Divination by Gerina Dunwich*
  • The Sea Priestess by Dion Fortune*
  • A Witch Alone, New Edition: Thirteen Moons to Master Natural Magic by Marian Green*
  • Earth Divination: A Practice Guide to Geomancy by John Michael Greer*
  • The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook by Karen Harrison*
  • The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson*
  • The Element Encyclopedia of Witchcraft by Judika Illes*
  • Sea Magic: Connecting with the Ocean’s Energy by Sandra Kynes
  • The Magical and Ritual Use of Herbs by Richard Allen Miller*
  • Magical Gardens: Cultivating Soil & Spirit by Patricia Monaghan
  • Grimoire for the Green Witch by Ann Moura
  • Mansions of the Moon for the Green Witch by Ann Moura*
  • Incense Crafting and Use of Magickal Sense by Carl F. Neal*
  • The Extremely Large Herbal Grimoire by Que Sage and Midnight Mindi*
  • Gardening with the Goddess: Creating Gardens of Spirit and Magick by Patricia Telesco*
  • The Folk-Lore of Plants by T. F. Thiselton- Dyer*
  • Herbs in Magic and Alchemy: Techniques from Ancient Herbal Lore by C. L. Zalewski*

Historical Reference:

  • Paganism Surviving in Christianity by Abram Herbert Lewis*
  • The God of Witches by Margaret Alice Murray*
  • The Malleus Maleficarum of Heinrich Kramer and James Sprenger by Heinrich Kramer, James Sprenger and Montague Summers*
  • Persephone’s Quest: Entheogens and the Origins of Religion by R. Gordon Wasson, Stella Kramrisch, Dr. Carl Ruck, and Jonathan Ott

Household/Kitchen Witchcraft:

  • Mrs. B’s Guide to Household Witchcraft: Everyday Magic, Spells, and Recipes by Kris Bradley
  • The Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews by Scott Cunningham*
  • Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Wicca in the Kitchen by Scott Cunningham
  • The Magical Household: Spells & Rituals for the Home by Scott Cunningham & David Harrington*
  • Spell Crafts: Creating Magical Objects by Scott Cunningham and David Harrington*

Magick:

  • A Little Book of Altar Magic by D.J. Conway*
  • Practical Protection Magick: Guarding and Reclaiming Your Power by Ellen Dugan
  • Meta- Magick: The Book of ATEM- Achieving New States of Consciousness through NLP, Neuroscience, and Ritual by Philip Farber*
  • Fire and Ice: The History, Structure, and Rituals of Germany’s Most Influential Modern Magical Order: The Brotherhood of Saturn by Stephen Flowers, PhD.*  
  • Applied Magic by Dion Fortune*
  • An Introduction to Ritual Magic by Dion Fortune*
  • High Magic’s Aid by Gerald B. Gardner*
  • Godwin’s Cabalistic Encyclopedia: A Complete Guide to Cabalistic Magic by David Godwin*
  • Circles of Power: Ritual Magic in the Western Tradition by John Michael Greer*
  • Learning Ritual Magic: Fundamental Theory and Practice for the Solitary Apprentice by John Michael Greer, Earl, Jr. King, Clare Vaughn*
  • E-Witch: Teachings of Magical Mastery by Deborah Gray*
  • The Basics of Magick by Amber K. *
  • True Magic: A Beginner’s Guide by Amber K.*
  • Faery Magic: Spells, Potions, and Lore from the Earth Spirits by Sirona Knight*
  • Modern Magick: Twelve Lessons in the High Magickal Arts by Donald Michael Kraig*
  • Modern Magick: Twelve Lessons in the High Magickal Arts, Second Edition by Donald Michael Kraig*
  • Protection and Reversal Magick by Jason Miller*
  • The Secrets of High Magic: Vintage Edition: Practical Instruction in the Occult Traditions of High Magic, Including Tree of Life, Astrology, Tarot, Rituals, Alchemic Processes, and Further Advanced Techniques by Francis Melville*
  • The Book of Solomon’s Magick by Carroll Runyon*
  • Instant Magick by Christopher Penczak*
  • A Wee kof Magic by the Sea Witch*
  • An Enchanted Life: An Adept’s Guide to Masterful Magic by Patricia Telesco*
  • Enocian Magic for Beginners: The Original System of Angel Magic by Donald Tyson*
  • Magician’s Workbook: Practicing the Rituals of the Western Tradition by Donald Tyson*
  • Not in Kansas Anymore: Dark Arts, Sex Spells, Money Magic, and Other Things Your Neighbors Aren’t Telling You by Christine Wicker*
  • Crone’s Book of Magical Words by Valerie Worth*

Tarot

  • Le Tarot de Marseille (The Tarot of Marseilles)*
  • The Tarot by Richard Cavendish*
  • Witches Tarot (with companion book) by Ellen Dugan and Mark Evans
  • Native American Tarot Deck by Magda Weck Gonzalez*
  • The Lover’s Tarot Deck (with companion book) by Jane Lyle
  • Legacy of the Divine Tarot (with companion book) by Ciro Marchetti
  • Renaissance Tarot Deck by US Games*
  • Lord Of The Rings Tarot Deck & Game by Vintage Sports Cards Inc

Occult:

  • Three Books on Occult Philosophy by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa
  • Psychology and the Occult by Carl Jung
  • Music and Its Secret Influence: Throughout the Ages by Cyril Scott and Desmond Scott
  • The Necronomicon: The Call of Cthulhu by Unknown*

Paranormal:

  • The World’s Most Haunted Places by by Jeff Belanger
  • Haunted Happenings by Robert Cahill
  • New England’s Things That Go Bump In The (New England’s Collectible Classics) by Robert Cahill
  • Mysteries and Legends of New England: True Stories Of The Unsolved And Unexplained by Diana Mccain
  • The New England Grimpendium by J. W. Ocker
  • Spooky New England: Tales Of Hauntings, Strange Happenings, And Other Local Lore by S. Schlosser and Paul Hoffman

Shamanism:

  • Walking Between the Worlds: The Science of Compassion by Gregg Braden*
  • Psychedelic Shamanism: The Cultivation, Preparation, and Shamanic Use of Psychotropic Plants by Jim DeKorne*
  • Hallucinogens and Shamanism by Michael Harner*
  • By Land, Sky, and Sea: Three Realms of Shamanic Witchcraft by Gede Parma*
  • Shamans/Neo-Shamans: Ecstasies, Alterative Archaeologies and Contemporary Pagan by Robert Willis*
  • In the Shadow of the Shaman: Connecting with Self, Nature & Spirit by Amber Wolfe*

Spellwork:

  • The Ulitmate Book of Spells: A Complete Guide to Using Magic to Improve Your Life and the World Around You by Pamela Ball*
  • The Goodly Spellbook: Olde Spells for Modern Problems Diixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen
  • Exploring Spellcraft: How to Create and Cast Effective Spells by Gerina Dunwich*
  • The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Spells: 88 Incantations to Entice Love, Improve a Career, Increase Wealth, Restore Health, and Spread Peace by Michael Johnstone*
  • The Salem Witches Book of Love Spells: Ancient Spells for Modern Witches by Lilith McLelland
  • The Ultimate Book of Spells by Michael Johnson*
  • The Elemental Encyclopedia of 1,000 Spells by Judika Illes*
  • The Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes*
  • Witches’ Potions and Spells by Kathryn Paulsen*

Symbols, Amulets, Sigils:

  • A Dictionary of Symbols by J. E. Cirlot and Herbert Read*
  • Basic Sigil Magic by Philip Cooper*
  • Practical Sigil Magic: Creating Personal Symbols for Success by Frater U.:D.:*
  • Dictionary of Occult, Hermetic and Alchemical Sigils by Fred Gettings*
  • The Complete Book of Amulets & Talismans by Migene González-Wippler*
  • Runic Amulets and Magic Objects by Mindy MacLeod and Bernard Mees*
  • Symbols, Signs, and Spells by Lolita Perdurabo*
  • Secrets of Magical Seals: A Modern Grimoire of Amulets, Charms, Symbols and Talismans by Anna Riva*
  • The Book of Talismans, Amulets and Zodiacal Gems by William Thomas and Kate Pavitt*
  • The Power of the Word: The Secret Code of Creation by Donald Tyson*

Spirit/Otherbeing Work:

  • Buckland’s Book of Spirit Communication by Raymond Buckland*
  • Divination for Beginners: Reading the Past, Present, and Future by Scott Cunningham*
  • Witch’s Guide to Ghosts and the Supernatural by Gerina Dunwich*
  • Summoning Spirits: The Art of Magical Evocation by Konstantinos*
  • Vampires: The Occult Truth by Konstantinos
  • Faerie Way: A Healing Journey to Other Worlds by Hugh Mynne and George A. Russell*
  • The Necronomicon by Simon*
  • Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Visionary Traditions in Early Modern British Witchcraft and Magic by Emma Wilby*

Voodoo/Hoodoo/Root Work:

  • Hoodoo, Voodoo, and Conjure: A Handbook by Jeffrey Anderson*
  • The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook by Denise Alvarado*
  • Hoodoo, Voodoo and Conjure: A Handbook by Jeffery E. Anderson*
  • The Candle and the Crossroads: A Book of Appalachian Conjure and Southern Root-Work by Orion Foxwood*
  • Charms, Spells, and Formulas: for the Making and Use of Gris Gris Bags, Herb Candles, Doll Magic, Incenses, Oils, and Powders by Ray T. Malbrough and Bill Fugate*
  • The Magical Power of Saints: Evocation and Candle Rituals by Rev. Ray T. Malbrough*
  • Waters of Return: The Aeonic Flow of Voodoo by Louis Martinie*
  • Sticks, Stones, Roots & Bones: Hoodoo, Mojo & Conjuring with Herbs by Stephanie Rose Bird*
  • The Super Voodoo Coursework by Unknown*

Wicca:

  • Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practicioner by Scott Cunningham
  • Living Wicca: A Further Guide for the Solitary Practitioner by Scott Cunningham*

Witchcraft:

  • Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America Today by Margot Adler
  • Witchcraft: Theory and Practice by Ly de Angeles*
  • Witchcraft on a Shoestring: Practicing the Craft Without Breaking Your Budget by Deborah Blake*
  • Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft by Raymond Buckland*
  • The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca, and Neo-paganism by Raymond Buckland
  • Witchcraft from the Inside: Origins of the Fastest Growing Religious Movement in America by Raymond Buckland*
  • Power of the Witch: The Earth, the Moon, and the Magical Path to Enlightenment by Laurie Cabot
  • The Witch in Every Woman: Reawakening the Magical Nature of the Feminine to Heal, Protect, Create, and Empower by Laurie Cabot
  • The Truth About Witchcraft Today by Scott Cunningham
  • Book of Shadows: A Modern Woman’s Journey into the Wisdom of Witchcraft and the Magic of the Goddess by Phyllis Curott
  • A Practical Guide to Witchcraft and Magick Spells by Cassandra Eason*
  • Old World Witchcraft: Ancient Ways for Modern Days by Raven Grimassi*
  • The Encyclopedia of Witches, Witchcraft, and Wicca by Rosemary Ellen Guiley*
  • Progressive Witchcraft by Janet Farrar and Gavin Bone*
  • The Meaning of Witchcraft by Gerald Gardner*
  • Italian Witchcraft: The Old Religion of Southern Europe by Raven Grimassi
  • Mastering Witchcraft by Paul Huson*
  • How to Become a Witch: The Path of Nature, Spirit & Magick by Amber K and Azrael Arynn K
  • Nocturnal Witchcraft: Magick After Dark by Konstantinos*
  • Aradia, Or the Gospel of the Witches by Charles G. Leland*
  • Witchcraft Today: An Encyclopedia of of Wiccan and Neopagan Traditions by James Lewis*
  • The God of the Witches Margaret Murray*
  • 8 Sabbaths of Witchcraft by Mike Nichols*
  • The Inner Temple of Witchcraft: Magick, Meditation and Psychic Development by Christopher Penczak
  • Solitary Witch: The Ultimate Book of Shadows for the New Generation by Silver RavenWolf
  • The Real Witch’s Handbook by Kate West*

World Pagan Practices:

  • Buckland’s Book of Saxon Witchcraft by Raymond Buckland*
  • The Book of the Dead: The Papyrus of Ani by E.A. Wallis Budge*
  • Egyptian Magic by E. A. Wallis Budge*
  • Witta: An Irish Pagan Tradition by Edain McCoy*
  • Practising the Witch’s Craft: Real Magic Under a Southern Sky by Douglas Ezzy*
  • Hermetic Magic:The Postmodern Magical Papyrus of Abaris by By Stephen Edred Flowers*
  • Mystical Qabalah by Dion Fortune*
  • The Book of the Holy Strega by Raven Grimassi*
  • By-Paths of Sicily by Eliza Putnam Heaton*
  • Germanic Spirituality by Bil Linzie*
  • The Religion of Ancient Egypt by W. M. Flinders Petrie*
  • The Mechanics of Ancient Eqyptian Magical Rituals by Robert Ritner*
  • Santeria: The Religion by Migene Gonzalez- Wippler

Augh, I know, right? I’d kill for a nudibranch aquarium. Unfortunately, the breeding/harvesting isn’t the issue so much as feeding them - they have highly specialized diets and most species eat anemones, sponges, and other nudibranchs, making them extremely difficult to take care of. Our tank is connected directly to the sea, so the only reason nudibranchs show up is because they come in through the pump as plankton and grow up there.

I think hooded nudibranchs might be potential aquarium subjects, since they feed on plankton and are very mobile.

Sea Herbs and Plants

When it comes to practicing sea witchcraft most people probably only really think about using seashells, fish bones, sea water etc but there’s a lot of herbs and plant life that can be used in sea magic as well.

Below are my own personal associations for plants and herbs that I use in my practice and some possible suggestions for those looking to find more plants and herbs to use in their sea craft.

Lavender

Now, I know what you’re thinking, This probably sounds a little weird and out of place. And, it is. I associate lavender with the smell of the tide rolling in just after the sunset, and more importantly I associate it with the Salt-Bearer, who to me is the very heart of the ocean. It is the only commonly used herb that I find myself able to associate with the sea and because of this, it’s my go-to herb. I tend to lean away from using lavender essential oil in place of using the actual bulbs because to me, the oil, no matter how strong the scent seems to be lacking something. I just don’t use it in spell work. 

Associations: Ebb and flow, purity, evening tide.

 Sea Things I tend to use it for:

  • Protection charms
  • Purification Salt
  • Sea “Tea”
  • Banishing Salt
  • Simple Beauty Baths
  • Low tide powder
  • Submerged Casting
  • Cleansing Spray for Shells and Bottles
  • Sigils
  • Almost everything. 

White Roses

Once again, this probably sounds really straight and I want tonight but it is normal I denies that this probably won’t work with everyone. I can’t truly describe why I associate white roses so heavily with the sea and sea magic but it is a thing. And to be honest, I fucking hate roses in all their colors but I can tolerate white and once again through the Salt Bearer, I was shown that this plant can easily be used in ocean magic. 

Associations: Morning tide, High tide, The Moon/moonlight and the sails of a ship. 

Sea Things I Tend to Use It For: 

  • Baths
  • Purity Salt
  • The charging of sea water. 
  • High Tide powder
  • “Softer” spells

Sea Weed

Sea weed is a lovely, lovely plant to keep handy and I suggest that any aspiring sea witches pick up some if you can. Now, when you do pick up the sea weed, you can choose to dry it or keep it hydrated; that part is up to you. I usually choose the former method as dried sea weed can be crushed up into a semi-fine powder and used that way as well. 

Associations: Moving up in life (since seaweed grows toward sunlight), Prosperity, Money, Success. 

Sea Things that I Tend to Use it For:

  • Money spells
  • Prosperity spells
  • Curses to cause failure and money loss
  • Beauty spells and glamours
  • Good luck charms
  • Motivation spells

Sea Moss

Sea moss usually grows on rocks such as those pictured above though it can grow in other places, I’ve seen it on docks and such. Sea moss is definitely strange but also worth it. When going about collecting sea moss, you should never do it with your bare hands, the reason for this is that sometimes when you go to pull the moss off of the rock, there are barnacles beneath the moss or around it that you weren’t able to see. 

Every time that I have gone to get sea moss and used my hands, I ended up slicing them on barnacles. Not a pleasant thing. I would suggest bringing a butter knife, wedge that under the moss and carefully pull off a few pieces. 

Associations: Endurance, adapting, the waves (water beats against them)

Sea Things That I Tend To Use It For: 

  • Endurance charms 
  • Rebirth

Salt Hay

 

Salt hay is my absolute favorite seaside plant but unfortunately, the beach that I live close to barely has any so it’s very rare that I ever get the chance to get my hands on some. One of the reasons that I am so crazy about it is because of how it gross, this fucker literally grows through the salt water when other plants would have died. Metal. 

Associations: Strength, secrecy and concealment, the connection of land and sea, standing tall.

Some Sea Things To Use It For: 

Concealment spells

Trickery

Self Appreciation Spells

Curses

Connecting of Two Unrelated Things

Other Ideas for Plants and Herbs to Use
Kelp
Red Algae
Green Alage
Dill

4

Detailed views of the dazzling ancient monuments of Central America through the eyes (and hands) of english explorers. 

Castle at Tulum, 1844, Frederick Catherwood. Getty Research Institute.
Plate 158, No. 2 in Incidents of travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan, 1853, John Lloyd Stephens. Getty Research Institute.
[Idol and altar at Copan] in Views of ancient monuments in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan, 1844, Frederick Catherwood. Getty Research Institute.
Archway; Casa del Governador, Uxmal, Frederick Catherwood (author), Andrew Picken (lithographer). Getty Research Institute.

3

kudos to myself I’ve hit rock bottom, so have a hooked wayfinder’s baby 

her name is Kalana and she has some combination of her parents “abilities” which in my mind is one part maui’s demigod-ness and another part moana’s connection to the sea which results in some form of water bending? idk lol im not too good at math, anyways

she is p arrogant and overconfident bc shes the daughter of a demigod and is pretty reckless in her actions and is a handful for her parents 

manic-entity  asked:

Do you know of any kinds of mermaids or sirens or other sea dwellers in Norse myth? (If there's two things I love, it's mermaids and Norse myth)

Sæl,

Off the top of my head, I cannot think of specific mermaids in Norse mythology. I can, however, recall that there is a Danish fairytale from which Disney made “The Little Mermaid,” and that is called the same thing in Danish: Den lille havfrue. You can read a translation of that for free by following the link.

Yet, there are plenty of sea-related beings and figures in Norse mythology. I am not familiar with specific creatures, like mermaids or sirens, but there are a lot of figures who may fit those roles. After all, Scandinavia has always been a place that had close connection with seafaring. I won’t be able to cover them all, but I can speak of and mention a few of these sea-related figures, at the very least.

As for my sources, you may see them below. All the page numbers listed throughout this post correspond to footnote 1.(1.)

I will start with the major figures, which are two gods that have very strong connections to the sea. There may be others, but I will just limit the discussion to those which are most prominently sea-based. The two gods that I speak of are Njörðr (Njord) and Ægir.


Njörðr (Njord):

Njord is a Vanir, and he is mentioned by Snorri more directly (that is, not just in the Skáldskaparmál section). Here is what is said about him:

“He lives in heaven in a place called Noatun (Enclosure of Ships). He rules over the motion of wind and moderates sea and fire. It is to him one must pray for voyages and fishing. He is so rich and wealthy that he can grant wealth of lands or possessions to those who pray to him for this.” (23)

There is more about him later in this text, in a section called Skáldskaparmál, which is about poetic dictation:

“How should Njord be referred to? By calling him the god of chariots or descendant of Vanir or a Van and father of Freyr and Freyja, the giving god.” (75)

I tend to see Njord as pertaining more to the riches of the sea. In other words, he, perhaps, represents the reward that the sea offers people; control of the sea and its resources would bring great wealth.

There is more, but that mostly pertains to how he came to be included among the Æsir, or other stories that he is a part of, but not playing a central role in. Ægir on the other hand, of whom we will shortly speak, is perhaps even more associated with the ocean than Njord.


Ægir (Also called Hler or Gymir):

He is generally considered to be the god of the sea, and he is best known for his feast with the Æsir (which goes badly thanks to an eagle that was actually a giant). Him and another god, one named Bragi, talk in great length about the details of poetry. Anyway, Ægir lives on an island, according to Skáldskaparmál, which is called Hlesey. For the most part, Ægir seems to play more of an ‘asker’ role in this text, asking Bragi questions and providing an opportunity for an explanation that will help the reader learn about poetics and mythology. 

Although Snorri (the author of this source I am discussing) kind of negates Ægir’s role quite a bit, once we look into the ways that the sea itself can be poetically referred to, it is obvious that he has strong connections with the sea.

Ægir is actually used as a personification for the ocean or sea at times. Note that these are where his three names come from. For example, this is from Skáldskaparmál:

“What terms for sea are there? It is called mere, ocean (ægir), engulfer (gymir), roarer (hler), main, road, depth, salt, water, swell.” (139)

To quote the poet Arnor:

“Let the court learn how the keen-spirited king of earls pursued the sea, the irresistible prince did not cease to oppose the ocean.” (139)

To quote the poet Ref:

“Gymir’s spray-cold spae-wife (Ran) often brings the twisted-rope-bear (ship) in Ægir’s (Ocean’s) jaws when the wave breaks.” (91)

Here, too, is a portion of a poem in Old Norse containing a reference to Ægir as the ocean:

Alfas began verr ægis
ítr báls haai málu;

The splendid hater of the fire of the sea (he who likes to rid himself of gold, the generous prince) defend the beloved pf the enemy of the wolf (Odin’s wife Jord-earth or land); (168)

Furthermore, Ægir has nine daughters with his wife Ran. Here are their names:

  1. Himinglæva (Heaven-bright)
  2. Dufa (Dip)
  3. Blodughadda (Blood-haired)
  4. Hefring (Lifting)
  5. Unn (Wave)
  6. Hronn (Wave)
  7. Bylgia (Billow)
  8. Drofn (Comber)
  9. Kolga (Cold One)

Ran (Ægir’s wife):

I am doing this an edit, so I shouldn’t really do too much to change the original post (since some won’t see the edits), but Ran should be considered on her own and not always associated through Ægir. After all, she is considered to be a goddess in her own right, so she ought to be given that respect. 

@bewareimfrench suggested that Ran could be a suitable candidate for a mermaid, and that honestly may not be a far stretch because she is equally as associated with the ocean as Ægir is. Here is a poem of her personified:

Segl skekr of hlyn–Huglar–
(hvast drífa skip) rasta,
en föll–of gram–Gylli
grunn (djúp) hata unna.
Rán viðr hafhreinum
háraust–skapar flaustum–
(hrönn fyrir húfi þunnum
heil klofnar) frið–deilu.

Sail shake above the prince on the current-maple (ship); tall ships drive keenly; the shallows near Hugl are dangerous to the waves’ horse (ship). Noisy Ran does not create peace for the sea-deer (ships); she causes conflict for cruisers, the entire wave breaks before the slender bow. (180)

I must say, though, that she is not an evil figure, even though that poem may seem a bit negative. It does show, however, that she has considerable power.


There is also Jormungandr (also called the Midgard Serpent):

Jormungandr is a giant serpent who is a child of Loki’s and the giantess Angrboda. This is said about Jormungandr:

“…[Odin] threw the serpent into that deep sea which lies round all lands, and this serpent grew so that it lies in the midst of the ocean encircling all lands and bites on its own tail.” (27)

Jormungandr is involved in a few stories, such as being magically disguised as a giant’s cat that Thor could not pick up or also Thor’s fishing trip with a giant named Hymir. Jormungandr is often used poetically to refer to both Thor (because Jormungandr is arguably Thor’s greatest foe, besides giants in general) and Loki (the father of such a creature).


There are also figures known as Sea-Kings and these are their names:

I believe that most of these names don’t refer to actual deities, but rather famous semi-historical figures (namely Vikings) that came to be used to refer to the ocean and sea. A Viking, after all, is a king of the sea, for it is the sea that guide a Viking to treasure and wealth (and perhaps Njord guides them to this as well, since it is treasure they seek).

“Atli, Frodi, Ali, Glammi, Beiti, Ati and Beimuni, Audmund, Gudmund, Atal and Gestil, Geitir, Gauti, Gylfi, Svendi.

Gæir, Eynef, Gaupi and Endil, Skekkil, Ekkil, Skefil and Solvi, Half and Hemlir, Harek and Gor, Hagbard, Haki, Hraudnir, Meiti.

Hiorolf and Hraudung, Hogni, Mysing, Hunding, Hviting, Heiti, Mævil, Hialmar, Moir, Hæmir, Mævi, Rodi, Rakni, Rer and Leifi.

Randver, Rokkvi, Refiner, Leifnir, Næfil, Ræfil, Nori, Lyngvi, Byrvil, Kilmund, Beimi, Iorek, Iosmund, Thvinnil, Yngvi, Teiti.

Virfil, Vinnil, Vandil, Solsi, Gautrek and Hun, Giuki, Budli, Homar, Hnefi, Horvi, Sorvi. I can see no more sea-kings.” (155)

These name often appear in poetry, especially in Icelandic sagas. Here is an example from Brennu-Njáls saga, and now you will understand the reference (I have bolden their names):

The shaping gods drove ashore
the ship of the keeper of bells (Thangbrand);
the slayer of the son of the giantess (Thor)
smashed Bison on the sea-gull’s rest (sea);
no help came from Christ
when the sea’s horse (ship) was crushed;
I don’t think God was guarding
Gylfi’s reindeer (ship) at all.

Thor drove Thangbrand’s beast (ship)
of Thvinnil far from its place;
he shook and shattered
the ship and slammed it ashore;
never will that oak (ship) of Atal’s field
be up to sea-faring again;
the storm, sent by him (Thor),
smashed it so hard into bits.
(2.)


And lastly, these are the various ways to which the sea or ocean can be referred to, poetically speaking (Kennings). 

Most we have discussed in some manner, but such references give interesting insight into the figures of Norse mythology that are actually associated with the sea (I have bolded names of personified figures):

“How shall sea be referred to? By calling it Ymir’s blood, visitor to the gods (Ægir), husband of Ran (Ægir), father of Ægir’s daughters (Ægir),…, land of Ran and of Ægir’s daughters and of ships and of terms for sea-ship, of keel, steam, planks, strake, of fish, ice, sea-kings’ way and roads, no less ring of the islands, house of the sands and seaweed and skerries, land of the fighting-tackle and of sea-birds, of sailing wind.” (91)

“What terms for sea are there? It is called mere, ocean (ægir), engulfer (Gymir), roarer (Hler), main, road, depth, salt, water, swell.” (139)

“Sea, every-lying, salt, ocean (Ægir), main, wetness, swim, flat one, dead calm and bay, resounding, overhang, emptiness, brawler, rocker and mere, sucker, suck, same, swallower, maelstrom and fjord.

Sound, creek, good passage, fluid and expanse, tempest, depth, breaker, dark, flood and surf, swell sparkler, engulfer (Gymir) and flower, rumbler and unquiet, surge, fen, snatcher.

Crashing, wake, league, fishing-ground, inlet and fishing-bank, water, deep and submersion, cove, tarn and canal, storm, ditch, pool, current, stream and brook, channel, spring, fount, eddy, waterfall and firth.

Herfring (lifting), roller, white one and offing, Hronn (wave), Ran (plunderer), Kolga (cold one) and Himinglæva (heaven-bright), Drofn (comber), Unn (wave) and sweller, Dufa (dip), Bylgia (billow), shoal and bore, Bloughadda (bloody-haired). (160-1)


Of course, I have by no means have covered everything (even what I have covered is only a summary of what is actually said), but that should give you more than enough of an idea about the role of the sea, and related figures/  creatures, in Norse mythology. I hope this has been interesting! I enjoyed researching the information for you.

Vera vitur og reika langt.
(Be wise and wander far.)


FOOTNOTES:

1. Snorri Sturluson, Edda, Anthony Faulkes trans. (repr., 1987; London: J.M. Dent, 1995). You may also read this for free online via Viking Society for Northern Research.

2. Robert Cook trans., Brennu-Njáls saga, in The Complete Sagas of Icelanders, vol. 3, edited by Viðar Hreinsson, Robert Cook, Terry Gunnell, Keneva Kunz, and Bernard Scudder. (Reykjavík: Leifur Eiríksson Publishing, 1997), 125.

2

⚓︎ MERMAIDS ⚓︎ → Landwalkers 

landwalkers are mermaids who have to ability to be on land as well as in the water. out of all the other types of mermaids, landwalkers are actually more closely related to humans in mental development and ethics. no one knows how to properly spot a landwalker, nor are they eager to make themselves known. they are closed off creatures, but consider themselves humans when on land. they even manage to live lives peacefully among humans. though try as they may to not, landwalkers will always be connected to the sea.

Percabeth One-Shot: Bad Day at the Aquarium

((Hope you enjoy! A little fluffy one shot where Percy’s had a stressful day and Annabeth comforts him))

She heard his body flop down on the couch before the front door even managed to close. 

It was the second Friday of two pay weeks, so Annabeth spent her day off reading and cleaning their small apartment on the seventh floor of the apartment building on 29th Street. Waking up early, Annabeth managed to vacuum every room and dust all the furniture before 10 am. The couple took turns cleaning the apartment. The demi-gods would switch back and forth between who’s turn it was to clean. Despite the fact Percy couldn’t dust to save his life, he did an incredible job cleaning the bathroom and making their bed.

Annabeth hadn’t been expecting to see him home for lunch, so the sudden opening of the door and thump on the couch was a pleasant surprise.

The blonde woman peaked her head around the corner of the kitchen door frame. A head of black hair pushed down into the patterned throw pillow, and a heavy sigh leaks out from the man’s body. She practically saw the tension swirling around his solid shoulders.

“I didn’t think you’d be home so early,” Annabeth questioned, her feet slowly shifting across the living room carpet.

A muffled grunt came from the pillow. The breath shifting from his lungs was rigid and frustrated, and Annabeth already knew what was wrong before he even said his name.

Philip. Philip Jenkins.

A 5’6 man with a snippy voice and the temperament of a bratty child. He had been the bane of Percy’s existence ever since he took the job at the aquarium. Philip was maybe two rungs above Percy on the employment scale. Maybe being the key word. The idea that he’s the boss of Percy was much more inflated in the little man’s head than was actually true. It was no longer a surprise to Annabeth to find her boyfriend frustrated and tired over the ruling of his coworker.

“Philip,” Percy barely muttered, his face still pressed into the pillow.

Annabeth’s hand softly slid under Percy’s chin. The soft fabric of the pillow pressed against her knuckles as she gently pushed up on his jawline. The man’s head lifted easily. His eyes were squeezed closed and the frustrated expression on his face was almost childish. It was cute to her.

Annabeth sat on the comfy couch, her heels resting on the recently polished, wooden coffee table. Percy’s head nuzzled into her stomach as another sigh left his lips. Annabeth’s fingers traced over his scalp. His hair sifted between her fingers. The tension began to leak out of his body simply by the movement of her fingers.

“Oh Philip,” Annabeth repeated, shaking her head. “What an awful man.”

Percy nodded in agreement as his face hid against her shirt’s fabric.

“We can always sick Thalia on him,” Annabeth suggested, her eyes on the wall across from them as she pondered the idea and let her fingers mindlessly move, “Or Piper even. Remember last time I showed up to bring you lunch?”

The chuckle slipped from Percy’s mouth as he turned onto his back. His sea-green eyes opened slowly and the early afternoon light flickered across his expression from the open patio glass door. Percy rolled to rest against her lap, and his face aimed towards the ceiling so his eyes could look over her face.

“He nearly peed himself,” Percy remembers.

When Philip tried to interrupt the pair simply saying hello, Annabeth practically ripped him a new one about manners and minding his own business. The little man turned a shade of pale and shuffled away with a half apology, avoiding Percy for a solid week after the encounter.

The light glinted over Percy’s pupils as the soft late summer breeze moved across the living room. Annabeth’s grey eyes connected with his sea-green ones, and the couple just looked at each other for a moment. Annabeth could feel Percy’s breathing finally back to normal as the peace gently leaked over his expression. There he was. Kind, calm, and goofy. Not frustrated and overworked. Percy loved his job, Annabeth knew that, he just didn’t like the people he was forced to work with.

Annabeth shifted and kissed the tip of Percy’s nose gently. A genuine smile moved across Percy’s lips, and he sat up from her lap. Percy kissed her as their noses brushed against one another. Their breath mingled before he pulled back and rested his forehead against hers.

“Thank you,” Percy breathed, his hand finding hers and squeezing it softly.

Annabeth’s knowing, comforting smile joined her nod she gave him, and the pair moved off from the couch.

“Be home on time?” She wondered, heading back for her tea and book.

Percy nodded. He leaned against the open front door as he watched her move towards the kitchen. Annabeth returned a moment later, half a sub wrapped up and in a bag.

“Don’t forget to eat, and don’t let him get under your skin.”

“Yes, dear.” Percy teased, kissing her cheek.

He took the sandwich from her and lingered enough to see her make it through the door frame.

“Say hi to the sea horses for me,” Annabeth quipped, Percy unable to see the soft smirk on her face.

His smile lingered across his lips the whole way back to the aquarium. He loved coming home for lunch.

Norse Paganism [1/?]
↳ Freyja.

Goddess of love, beauty, fertility, war, divination and magic. Freyja, of the race of the Vanir, is a daughter of Njord and a sister of Freyr. As the story reads she was, at the treaty of peace with the Vanir, delivered over by them and accepted by the Æsir among the goddesses. She was wedded to Od, but he left her and went out into foreign lands; she often wept over him, wept golden tears. Her daughters, Noss and Gersemi, were so beautiful that from them all precious gems have taken their names; and from Freyja the designation freyja or frúva (meaning “lady”) is likewise said to have been formed. Freyja was called goddess or bride of the Vanir, and one of Loki’s scandalous assertions was that she had love-dealings with her brother Freyr. She is also linked specifically with a special kind of witchcraft known as seiðr, in that she was a priestess of the Vanir who first taught this knowledge to the Aesir. Freyja was in the habit of driving a cart drawn by two cats; and she had in her possession the magnificent necklace called Brisingamen. She wore this most cherished possession of amber around her neck. She dwelt in Folkvang, in the great hall named Sessrymnir. Of all the heroes who fell in battle, half became her portion; it was her right to choose them, and to her they came in Folkvang. She had special authority in the relations of love, yet she was not the only goddess of love to whom men had recourse; Sjofn had the power to kindle love between men and women, and Lofn to help those who loved each other but who met with difficulties in winning the beloved. Freyja had many names. Gefn expresses her character as a giver. Mardoll suggets a connection with the sea (marr). Syr, ‘sow’, reminds us of the boar symbol that belonged to her (as well as to her brother Freyr). Horn is another of her names which occurs in place-names in east Sweden, and may be connected with Horr (flax), indicating a special local variant of the cult of the vegetation goddess (it is said that when rye is ripe, Freyja is out watching).