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The Faces Of Currently Living School Shooters.

*Keep in mind, not all school shootings are the same.  There are different motives, and some of those pictured here killed 0.  Some of them are currently released, some were never sentenced.  There are many many more living school shooters, but their identities were never released to the public (this is a very common practice in countries outside of the United States), hence there are no photographs of them.  I have also included some individuals who PLANNED to shoot up their school, but were thwarted in their attempts.*

From Left to Right.
Row One:
-Alex Hribal, Pennsylvania.
-Alvaro Castillo, North Carolina.
-Amy Bishop Anderson, Alabama.
-Andrew Charles Williams, California.
-Andrew Golden, Arkansas.
-Andrew Wurst, Pennsylvania.

Row Two:
-Anthony TJ Solomon, Georgia.
-Barry Loukaitis, Washington.
-Brandon McInerney, California.
-Brandon Spencer, California.
-Brendan Liam O’Rourke California.
-Brenda Ann Spencer, California.

Row Three:
-Bruco Strong Eagle Eastwood, Colorado.
-Bryan Oliver, California.
-Charles Underwood, North Carolina.
-Christopher Williams, Vermont.
-Darrell Cloud, Washington.
-David Taber, Massachusetts.

Row Four:
-Elizabeth Bush, Pennsylvania.
-Erich Hainstock, Wisconsin.
-Eric Houston, California.
-Eric McKeehan, Massachusetts.
-Evan Ramsey, Alaska.
-Floyd Eugene Brown South, Carolina.

Row Five:
-Gary Scott Pennington, Kentucky.
-Georgio Dukes, Illinois.
-Hammad Memon, Alabama.
-Jamar Siler, Tennessee.
-James Alan Kearbey, Kansas.
-James Austin Hancock, Ohio.

Row Six:
-James Scott Newman, Nevada.
-Jame Rouse, Tennessee.
-James William Wilson Jr., South Carolina.
-Jared Cano, Florida.
-Jesse Osborne, South Carolina
-Jillian Robbins, Pennsylvania.

Row Seven:
-John Jason McLaughlin, Minnesota.
-Jon Romano, New York.
-Joseph Colt Todd, Arkansas.
-Joseph Poynter, Ohio.
-Kenneth Bartley, Tennessee.
-Khalil Sumpter, New York.

Row Eight:
-Kylian Barbey, France.
-Kipland Kinkel, Oregon.
-Kristofer Hans, Montana.
-Leo Kelly, Michigan.
-Leonard McDowell, Wisconsin. 
-Luis Enrique Guzman-Rincon, Colorado.

Row Nine:
-Luke Woodham, Mississippi.
-Mason Campbell, New Mexico.
-Mason Staggs, Texas.
-Michael Brandon Hill, Georgia.
-Michael Carneal, Kentucky.
-Michael Phelps, Indiana.

Row Ten:
-Mikhail Pivnev, Russia.
-Mitchell Johnson, Arkansas.
-Nathaniel Brazill, Florida.
-Neil Allen MacInnis, Virginia.
-Nicholas Elliott, Virginia.
-Odane Greg Maye, Virginia.

Row Eleven:
-Patrick Lizotte, Nevada.
-Peter Odighizuwa, Virginia.
-Raisheem Rochwell, Pennsylvania.
-Robert Gladden, Maryland.
-Russell Frantom, Indiana.
-Sean Johnson, Missouri.

Row Twelve:
-Sergey Gordeyev, Russia.
-Stephen Morgan, Connecticut.
-Steven Jamal Hare, Michigan.
-Teah Wimberly, Florida.
-Thomas M. Lane III, Ohio.
-Todd Cameron Smith, Canada.

Row Thirteen:
-Tronneal Mangum, Florida
-Valery Fabrikant, Canada
-Vincent Leodoro, Oregon
-Wayne Lo, Massachusetts.
-William Morton, Michigan.
-Yakash Adav, India.

SOUTH VIETNAM. Town of Phucat. 1971. The Drug problem with American GI’s in Vietnam. In an Amnesty house where an addict is being given first-aid.

In 1971, the 16th year of the Vietnam War, two congressmen, Robert Steele from Connecticut and Morgan Murphy from Illinois, made a discovery that stunned the American public. While visiting the troops in Vietnam, the two congressmen discovered that over 15 percent of US soldiers had developed an addiction to heroin. (Later research, which tested every American soldier in Vietnam for heroin addiction, would reveal that 40 percent of servicemen had tried heroin and nearly 20 percent were addicted.) The discovery shocked the American public and led to a flurry of activity in Washington.

Photograph: Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

SOUTH VIETNAM. Town of Da Nang. At the Airport. 1971. The Drug problem with American GI’s in Vietnam. Two American soldiers under the influence of drugs.

In 1971, the 16th year of the Vietnam War, two congressmen, Robert Steele from Connecticut and Morgan Murphy from Illinois, made a discovery that stunned the American public. While visiting the troops in Vietnam, the two congressmen discovered that over 15 percent of US soldiers had developed an addiction to heroin. (Later research, which tested every American soldier in Vietnam for heroin addiction, would reveal that 40 percent of servicemen had tried heroin and nearly 20 percent were addicted.) The discovery shocked the American public and led to a flurry of activity in Washington.

Photograph: Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos