npr.org
In Major Blow To Trump, GOP Health Care Bill Vote Delayed
The bill faced opposition from the center and right within the party. And Trump, for all his efforts at deal-making, hasn't been able yet to secure the votes.

John Boehner, when he was speaker of the GOP-controlled House, once likened his job to keeping 218 frogs in a wheelbarrow.

President Trump and current House Speaker Paul Ryan are running into the same problem.

NPR’s Susan Davis reports that the long-promised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, has been delayed. It was supposed to get a vote Thursday night, but it has been running into trouble — from both the right and the center.

Seven years ago…

Then-President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law on March 23, 2010.

“Today, I’m signing this reform bill into law on behalf of my mother, who argued with insurance companies even as she battled cancer in her final days,” Obama said.

Then-Vice President Joe Biden proclaimed it a big (insert expletive here) deal — near microphones, of course. (Photo: Win McNamee, Getty)

URGENT: Republicans are voting today on their plan that would drive up insurance premiums, leave 24 million more uninsured, and defund Planned Parenthood. Take action NOW → ☎️ 1-866-665-4470

npr.org
Trump Faces Most Consequential Day Of His Presidency So Far
The president's reputation as a deal-maker is on the line Friday as House Republicans face a politically perilous vote to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Ultimately, the House vote could be an exercise in legislative futility. If the bill does pass, it will be changed in the Senate, where it also faces an uphill battle. And this is just part one of the three-part plan by Republicans to overhaul and replace Obamacare.

But if the first bill dies in the House, the broader message could be devastating for both Trump and House Republicans. The failure would signal that they haven’t yet found a way to govern in Washington despite finally holding both the White House and control of Congress. The setback would spell doom for many of Trump’s other priorities, including tax reform, and exacerbate what’s already been a bad week for the White House, which began with FBI Director James Comey confirming to Congress that they are investigating possible ties between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

House Vote on Obamacare Lite is Postponed!

Thanks to the hard work of Rand Paul and the House Freedom Caucus, Obamacare Lite didn’t have enough votes to pass! Hopefully true negotiations can begin!

Written by Julie Hirschfeld Davis, Robert Pear, and Thomas Kaplan for the New York Times:

House Republican leaders postponed a planned vote Thursday in the full House on legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act as President Trump and his allies struggled to round up votes amid a tide of defections from the proposed replacement bill. …

“We’re certainly trying to get to ‘yes,’” said Representative Mark Meadows, Republican of North Carolina and the chairman of the House Freedom Caucus. “We’ve made very reasonable requests and we’re hopeful that those reasonable requests will be listened to and ultimately agreed to.” …

The emerging power of the Freedom Caucus, a group that has been historically marginalized in policy-making but a thorn in the side of leadership, is one of the surprises of the rushed health care debate. The Freedom Caucus has been empowered by the addition of one of their own, former Representative Mick Mulvaney, to the senior White House staff as budget director, and Mr. Trump’s disengagement from policy details coupled with his intense desire to score a win after a rocky start to his presidency. …

As the crucial vote approached, party leaders appeared to be short of a majority, as moderate Republicans continued to move away from the bill. …

Conservatives say the mandates, as interpreted in rules issued by the Obama administration, add to the costs of health insurance and make it difficult for insurers to offer lower-cost options tailored to the needs of consumers. …

A spokeswoman for the Freedom Caucus, Alyssa Farah, said Wednesday that more than 25 members of the caucus were considered “no” votes on the health care measure — enough to sink the bill in the House, though that count could not be independently verified.

Read the entire article here.

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Wondering what a call to your elected official actually sounds like? We got you.

If you’re on this website (or a human alive today) there’s a really good chance you’re afraid to call your Congressional Representative because you don’t know how the phone call will go. We’re trying to remove some of the mystery around calling elected officials to show you a few different examples of first time callers leaving a comment with a government official. It’s so easy!

In this call we see Lyric calling her Congressman, Brad Sherman, about Steve Bannon. Unfortunately, sometimes it can be confusing at first figuring out exactly who to call. As Lyric learned, you have to be especially careful that you’re calling somebody from the United States Congress, not your state’s Congress (unless you’re calling about a local issue). But don’t worry, this problem is easy to solve. If you have this post in front of you, you can shortcut the lookup process by using this handy website

If you don’t have this post in front of you, just google who your congressional representatives are, making sure you get the answer from a federal and not state website:

To find out who represents you in the Senate, just google “[your state] Senator.” Make sure you’ve found US Congress Senators, not state Senators. Google should also autopopulate with your state’s two Senators if you use that search query. There will be only two, no matter what. You can call either or both of them.To find who represents you in the House, google “Who is my representative.” The first google result should be a house.gov website that prompts you for your zip code. Enter it in and you’re good to go. You will only have one Congressional Representative no matter what. Once you get the name of your congressperson, google “[your representative] phone number” to get the phone number you need.

Read more about how to call your congressional representative here.

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And the institutional coddling of white racists under the Trump administration continues. 

This excerpt is *important* for context:

Speaking to reporters, [Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (D-IL)] expressed anger about what had happened.

“I’ve been here 25 years and I’ve never been told by the Speaker of the House that I can’t attend a meeting I’ve requested,” he fumed.

The speaker of the house PAUL RYAN is facilitating a system of racism and oppression when he chooses to bar Representatives of color, their colleagues, from voicing their concerns about racist acts. 

As we can see the decision to prevent notably outspoken and critical voices of color from attending the meeting they requested goes against 25 years of precedent. Ryan is GOING out of his way and ignoring precedent because the feelings of sensitive white racism is too valuable.