congolese

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DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO. 2012-2013. Produced in North and South Kivu. Film stills from The Enclave by Richard Mosse. [6/13]

The Irish photographer filmed strange footage of the country using a special surveillance film once used by the military. Picking up invisible infra-red rays given off by plant life, the film makes any greenery show up in ‘bubblegum’ pink, meaning guerilla soldiers could be spotted among the leaves.

Civil war has been happening in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo for many years. Since 1998, the nation has seen 5.4 million war-related deaths.

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DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO. 2012-2013. Produced in North and South Kivu. Film stills from The Enclave by Richard Mosse. [5/13]

The Irish photographer filmed strange footage of the country using a special surveillance film once used by the military. Picking up invisible infra-red rays given off by plant life, the film makes any greenery show up in ‘bubblegum’ pink, meaning guerilla soldiers could be spotted among the leaves.

Civil war has been happening in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo for many years. Since 1998, the nation has seen 5.4 million war-related deaths.

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DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO. 2012-2013. Produced in North and South Kivu. Film stills from The Enclave by Richard Mosse. [1/13]

The Irish photographer filmed strange footage of the country using a special surveillance film once used by the military. Picking up invisible infra-red rays given off by plant life, the film makes any greenery show up in ‘bubblegum’ pink, meaning guerilla soldiers could be spotted among the leaves.

Civil war has been happening in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo for many years. Since 1998, the nation has seen 5.4 million war-related deaths.

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‘Félicité’

Alain Gomis’ character study of a struggling single mother in Kinshasa evolves into something far more sensually complex than it initially seems.

Life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans, goes the old saying — though for the variously stymied characters of “Félicité,” life hits them when they have no plan at all. A loose, vibrant fourth feature film from Franco-Senegalese director Alain Gomis, “Félicité” likewise builds to a fever of energy and activity while never sketching out more than the bones of a narrative: It’s a film in which a hard-earned smile, the contact between one person’s skin and another’s, or a serene strain of music amid the everyday noise can qualify as a dramatic event. Following a proudly independent club singer through the ragged streets of Kinshasa as she seeks a way to save her hospitalized son, Gomis’ latest is far from the miserablist issue drama that synopsis portends, instead weaving a sensual, sometimes hopeful, sometimes disturbing urban tapestry with threads of image, sound, poetry, and song. 

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO. Kinshasa. October 31, 2016. A girl cries outside the Bondeko morgue as the bodies of six militants of the Congolese opposition party UDPS, who were burnt in arsons during the night of Sept. 19, 2016 at the party’s headquarters, are released.

According to the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, President Kabila should not be allowed to serve more than two terms. On 19 September 2016, massive protests calling for him to step down as legally mandated rocked Kinshasa, and killed 17 people. Elections to determine a successor to Kabila were originally scheduled to be held on 27 November 2016. However, on 29 September 2016, the nation’s electoral authority announced that the election would not be held until early 2018. According to the electoral commission’s vice president, the commission “hasn’t called elections in 2016 because the number of voters isn’t known." However, the opposition alleges that Kabila had intentionally delayed the election to remain in power.

More demonstrations are planned to mark the passing of the end of the presidential mandate. Opposition groups claim that the outcome of late elections would be civil war.

Photograph: Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty