congenital deformation

anonymous asked:

I needed a purge from Grindr and all those apps back in Jan... been off those apps for months now and haven't gotten dick since October... as horny as I am I kind of want to stay off those apps, what are my other options?

Unless you’ve been through a tragic accident or have a congenital deformity, you probably have two hands to choose from.

And tbh, dildos guys. They last way longer and you’ve probably spent more money on a real man wasting your time. Drop some coin and stop bein’ stingy to your bumhole.

On March 14th 2013, 30 year old David Renz forced his way into the vehicle of 47 year old librarian Lori Ann Bresnahan, who was just leaving a shopping mall with her 10 year old daughter. Renz, who suffers from a congenital facial deformity, produced what was assumed to be a real pistol and forced Lori to drive to a remote area and pull over.

Once there, Renz bound the terrified mother to a headrest inside the car and, after using a knife to cut a hole in her clothes, he raped the little girl. Desperate for her daughter to escape, Lori fought against their attacker while the child fled the vehicle and alerted the first civilian she could find. Renz was apprehended by police shortly after, but Lori’s body was discovered strangled with multiple stab wounds to her head and chest.

David Renz pleaded guilty to the rape and murder charges, for which he was sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole in May 2014. Just hours before committing these horrific crimes, Renz had cut off a tracker tag which he had been ordered to wear whilst out on bail for possessing more than 11,000 images of child pornography and 1,100 child porn videos. For this charge, he received a 30 year prison sentence in March 2014.

I think it’s worth a shot.

From what I’ve seen, he has a congenital heart deformity not unlike Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome. It’s under a lot of pressure and will continue to do so as he gets older, especially in these condition. The risk of heart failure grows substantially higher.

Surgery can help, and he’s had more than a few, but I think a transplant is the only long-term option.

If it’ll help…then we should try it.

anonymous asked:

Fics with insecure!Spock where he's afraid to admit his feelings for Jim? Or insecure about an established relationship? Please and thank you in advance! Appreciate all of the hard work you guys put into the blog!

The Wrong Questions by objectlesson

A list of reasons why it hasn’t happened yet.

Damaged Goods by corpus_invictus

“I wanna see a fic in which Spock has a congenital defect or deformity due to his hybrid genetics. Uhura is turned off by what ever it is and dumps Spock. Spock sulks and hates himself until Kirk comes in and saves the day with Epic Reassuring Love Makings. I want emotional depth and details about Spock’s problem and how he deals with it. I want SecretlySmart!Kirk being caring but not mushy.”

Good fic, though I feel that Uhura’s actions are ooc

Fulfilling the Needs of the One (Or the Both)by Vulcan Eyebrows

Spock begins to wonder if his relationship with Jim has been one-sided in his own favor.

 Gone, but for the Shadow by Rae

You couldn’t choose your family. All you could do was survive them.

“It’s okay. Spock, it’s okay.”

“Do not leave me, Jim. Please. I will try harder.”

Map Your Body Like the Stars by Red_Mercutio

Jim is absolutely mad about Spock’s freckles. Spock isn’t so sure.

Sacrifice by lahmrh

Spock is uncertain about Jim’s feelings; Spock Prime relates the events of The Search for Spock in an attempt to reassure him.

2

Hey guys, I know I’ve been MIA lately with my big move to Louisiana along with starting my clinical year of vet school, but I just wanted to share this story/reach out and ask for positive thoughts and prayers.

This little guy came into the clinic tonight when I was helping out in the ICU. He was found in the middle of a field and a Good Samaritan brought him in to the teaching hospital because he thought we could learn from him. The doctor on duty proclaimed that although he is perfectly healthy, his congenital deformity makes him pretty unadoptable (he was born with those spaghetti legs, they are not broken). So he stated that he would euthanize the kitten unless any of us wanted him. He said if they took it to a shelter, it would be euthanized on arrival because of his legs. I was interested because I didn’t want the kitten to die, so I asked him to let me think about it. He gave me until the end of his shift to decide, and said he wasn’t passing the kitten off to the doctor on the next shift; it needed to be adopted or he would euthanize it.

Now, I know that this doctor may sound like an uncaring asshole from the way I’m telling the story, but I can tell you that he was very nice and in fact does care about the animals under his care. However, in a hospital as big as the one I’m at, if you kept every bleeding heart kitten that came through the door, there wouldn’t be space for actual patients. Being a vet means making hard calls or we would all be on “Animal Hoarders”.

So I decided to give the kitten a chance. I named him Lieutenant Dan, got him some kitten food, and brought him home. He’s currently in a wire dog crate in my bathroom because he’s unvaccinated and I don’t want him near Charlie or my dog Beckett (I haven’t talked about him much because he was a family dog living with my parents but I brought him with me to Baton Rouge and he’s doing great here!)-

Here’s the crappy part of Lt Dan’s story. I suspect he may be incontinent. He has a bob tail that points towards his head, and between the funky legs and the short tail, there is a good chance the nerves to his bladder and/or poop region are messed up. He hasn’t pottied since I got him, so I don’t know for sure. It’s encouraging that his hind end is clean, but like I said, that short tail and bad leg combo is not encouraging.

So if he is incontinent, I will have to bring him back to euthanize him. There is no way I would be able to care for him for the next year with my schedule. It’s unfair for him to be in a diaper or in a cage for an entire year, especially when I’ll be gone for 12 hours or more at a time. And I can’t take on the commitment of a diapered cat for the rest of its life. It’s not like my schedule will slow down after I graduate vet school.

However, if he IS continent, he stays! I’ve already talked to one of the doctors about getting his hind legs amputated. He moves around fine with just his front legs, and I would probably get him a little wheel chair.

Let’s all keep our fingers crossed and hope that Lieutenant Dan can control his bowels and bladder. And if any of you think I’m a horrible witch for condemning him to death just for being unable to control when and where he eliminates, I’ll tell you that I am considering his quality of life. Yes it breaks my heart that he may have to die. I may have saved his life today only to watch him die on Monday and that sucks balls. But I wanted to give him a chance when nobody else would.

8

Stiffs, Skulls and Skeletons – Over 400 medical portraits taken in the 1800s and early 1900s

Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons: Medical Photography and Symbolism
by Stanley B. Burns, MD and Elizabeth A. Burns
Schiffer Publishing, LTD
2014, 304 pages, 6.6 x 9.6 x 0.8 inches
$56 Buy a copy on Amazon

Dr. Stanley Burns has collected over 1-million medical photographs from the 1800s and early 1900s, when posing for a professional portrait in the style of a painting was trendy. For a doctor or surgeon, this meant posing stiffly and solemnly with bones, cadavers, and medical tools. But the earnestness didn’t always come without a sense of morbid humor, as shown in photos like the 1890 “Group Portrait” of three sitting cadavers (two in chairs) holding hands with a group of men who act as if nothing is out of the ordinary. If a medical student today posed humorously with a dead body, it might be judged as inappropriate, but that doesn’t seem to have been the case over 100 years ago.

Not all of these early photographs include medical professionals. Some only portray X-rays, skeletons or bones, many that tell a fragment of a story, like the skull with a hammer sticking out of it titled, “Harvey Morgan – killed by Indians – 1870,” or the skull with a puzzle-piece hole in its side titled, “Bull Run Battle Field Find, Perforation of the Cranium by a Musket Ball.” Although most of the photos in this book are easy enough to digest, I had a squeamish time with the photos of living patients who had rare conditions, such as the skinny 15-year-old boy missing both clavicles (1907) and the naked, unhappy-looking “Hemi Man” (1907) with “multiple congenital deformities.” Originally shot for others in the medical field to view and study, the over-400 photographs in this book, written by Dr. Burns and his daughter Elizabeth, weren’t meant for the layperson and have never been published until now.  – Carla Sinclair

January 27, 2015

A while back I told you all I would fill you in on what was up with Chloe. Travel plans and fighting with a moron who was selling our designs without our permission (and without compensating us of course) slowed me down a little. Here is an update I posted on Facebook yesterday (yes, Chloe speaks on FB):

“Hi Everybody! It’s me, Chloe! I got to go see that nice doctor again today. I’m still a little woozy from the sedative because they took a bunch of x-rays (okay 5) of my spine and neck. It looks like I have some kind of congenital deformity in my neck so that several of my discs are close together. This is probably what is causing my front leg issues. I also have some deformations in a couple places in my back. One place is probably congenital - which mom tells me means I have had it from puppihood - and the other is likely one of a couple of things caused by aging. So while we await the results of my DNA testing for degenerative myelopathy (I told you about that right? Mom and Dad shoved this weird spongy thing in my mouth to swab my cheek and then smushed my cells onto a card and sent it to the University of Missouri for testing), the parental units are going to try giving me the steriod prednisone to see if that makes me feel better. I’ll keep you posted!

OH! AND I have an extra RIB! Isn’t that exciting!”

I’ll try to be better about posting here, too!

Ella Harper was born in Tennessee in 1873, and known as the “Camel Girl”. 

She was born with an orthopedic condition that caused her knees to bend backwards, called “congenital genu recurvatum”. This deformity is very rare. Her preference to walk on all fours resulted in her nickname.

In 1886 she was featured as the star in W. H. Harris’s Nickel Plate Circus.