conference and convention

thecrownedrose  asked:

I'm so pissed at my coworker! I had to go to this conference at the convention center and right across the street is Disneyland! I jokingly suggested to our group that we blew off the conference to go to Disneyland instead and he just looked at me like aren't you a little old for that! I later find out he went AFTER the conference with another woman who is NOT his fiancée. I can't believe I ever had a crush on that arrogant and condescending jerk!

What a class A douche b! Hopefully he stepped in some gum and peed his pants on the Matterhorn.

Kid: “Who’s your least favorite player to come up against?”

TVR: “Probably my brother.”

Kid: “Well he plays for Toronto, so you don’t have anything to worry about.”

—  “Vinny” at the Kids Only Press Conference. Blackhawks Fan Convention. 7.16.16.

“The task of all good men today should be to relight the flame of civilization.”
— Mark Yuray

Full quote: “ The task of all good men today should be to relight the flame of civilization. I could re-state the same sentence in a thousand ways: to decrease societal time preference, to renew faith in God and his Word, to improve social technology, etc. And yet, the original civilizers did not civilize through electronic devices, at office desks, on their behinds, during conferences and conventions. The original civilization was a baked mud cabin and a fire illuminating a dangerous black void. It would be wise to remember that theory was a consequence of civilization, and that civilization was a project of stone, sweat, blood, fire and flesh before a project of the mind.”

flickr

Essex Inn - Chicago, Illinois

Modern luxury in Downtown Chicago on Michigan Avenue at 8th Street Chicago’s New Downtown Motel Closest Motel to all Convention facilities 325 Units across from Grant Park and the Lake - Free Covered Parking, TV, Radio, F.M., Ice Cubes,Convention, Conference, and Private Dining Rooms - Self-Dialing Phones - Room Service - Sun Deck - Delmonico’s Restaurant - Cocktail Parlour - Heated Swimming Pool - Playground Area
800 So. Michigan - Chicago 5, Ill. WE 9-2800 - TWX-CG82.
AAA Approved. Member of the Best Western Motels and the Aristocrat Inns of America.

Privilege.

This is something that majority group values, cherishes and has. A Minority group? Is limited. They don’t have everything the majority has, no matter how hard they try it just still doesn’t work.

We’re going to talk about Hearing and Deaf Privilege. Or in this case audism. I’m sure you’re familiar with the word Audism. If not, basically it’s when someone’s hearing status oppresses another persons hearing because other person’s hearing isn’t of ‘norm’. 

Hearing people have the privilege of having both, hearing and voicing. The ability to communicate and understand without a problem, in most cases. The ability to go to that movie theatre and watch it without a problem. Go to meetings, events, conferences, conventions, classes, anywhere… and have access to all information with out trouble.

Deaf/HOH people? We are limited in this. We don’t have the privilege of walking out to anywhere and understanding or communicating in the language everyone understands. We don’t have the access to go to any movie we want and get whats being said. We need closed captions, we need Sign Language, we need to be able to see your face (in case those who can lipread)… the list is endless. 

Those who use Sign Language, don’t have the full accessibility into the world around us. We are limited, rely on gestures, paper/pen, interpreters, sometimes lipreading, and sometimes the little hearing we do have. Yet we still struggle to understand whats being said. We struggle to be heard from the majority group. Those who use their voices to be understood, it’s still a struggle on our part. Why? Because we are using the limited hearing we have to understand what little we can, to pronounce the best of our ability for people to understand, to use our brains and eyes to lipread and guess what is being told to us, to think twice as hard in understanding what is being said. 

Even if we have both the ability to sign and speak, we are still behind. We still get isolated, excluded from certain things because people don’t accommodate, people talk to fast when we ask for clarification, for repetition… When we use sign language, it’s get treated like its ‘a rare disease’ or something that shouldn’t be shown. When we use interpreters or request for them, it’s sometimes not even there or provided. The access is rarely fully there. We keep advocating for Deaf rights, for accommodations… when it still doesn’t happen.

Deaf/HOH are minority, in a majority. When there are Deaf events, classes about Deaf Life, Culture, World… and Majority comes to learn about our World… we still get shoved to the side. They (majority) try to ‘help us’ when we don’t need it. What I mean by this is when they interpret for us when we didn’t ask, when they speak on behalf of us, when they think they know everything and ‘advocate for us’ without our permission. They sometimes exclude us in our own world, voice when they are in a Deaf environment or surrounded by Deaf people who do sign. We, Deaf/HOH accommodate their needs, by speaking (voicing) so they can understand us, we are patient when learners are learning about our world/life/culture, we are lipreading their speech pattern to understand them. But when it comes to them accommodating us… we get rude remarks, stares, negativity, annoyance. We do our best to accommodate their needs, but when it comes to their turn to accommodate ours? It’s frequently denied or looked at strangely.

Want to NOT be an Audist person? 
Accommodate us when we ask for it.

Don’t look at down upon us because of our deafness. Many of us take pride in being Deaf. Being apart of a community, culture, world, having a language, history of our own, a place to call home.

When we ask for repetition, clarity, specific requests on location/positioning… please do so. Lipreading is exhausting, straining our limited hearing - is exhausting, guessing the missing pieces, the lighting effects our ability to lipread too - we need good lighting.

Around Deaf people who use Sign Language? SIGN! It doesn’t matter if you know just the alphabet, or the basics or not even all. Include us in things. When we are in a group gathering, noisy environment, anywhere and you are surrounded by Deaf people… it is Culturally Appropriate to use Sign Language when around Deaf people. It’s considered rude when people who are fluent, learning Sign Language… to not use Sign Language when in a Deaf environment or surrounded by Deaf people. If it’s a long event, meeting, appointment… whatever it is…  and you’re not fluent or is a student, request an interpreter. Interpreters went to schooling for these kind of things.

I could go on with a ramble on do’s and don’ts. But please, just try to be respectful when you are surrounded by Deaf / HOH people. We don’t arrive at 9 and finish at 5. We are all around you, you just don’t realize it. If you’re in a class setting with Deaf students… please sign, gesture, face us when speaking, use paper/pen… Find a way to include us in the conversations, inside and outside of class time. At events, like a party that is dominated by Hearing? You know Sign language, you see a Deaf / HOH person, say hello to them! We appreciate when we find people who at least knows a little bit or try to engage us in conversations when we are lost. 

Please be considerate. Include us in things. We don’t exclude you in things, when you even know a little bit of Sign Language, we slow down our pace in signing, we rephrase, redirect, we are patient people. Now it’s your turn to be patient and include us, engage us in conversations.

Tech Sessions at the 2012 American Council of the Blind Conference and Convention #ACB12

Dear all,

This year, the Information Access Committee presents a rich variety of activities that you will be able to enjoy. These activities are popular; so, book early. Come one, come all. See below for descriptions.

Please note that our Tuesday sessions are limited to 60 people each and tickets must be purchased in advanced.

We look forward to seeing you at our events.

Warmest regards,

Pratik

Saturday July 7 – 2:00 PM to 4:30 PM

TITLE: 411 from the IAC

TICKETS: $5 preregistration; $7 at the door

SHORT DESCRIPTION: Come to hear about the latest on screen enlargement, accessible medical devices, and tech for  your kitchen.

LONG DESCRIPTION:

A.         2:00 to 2:05: Introduction - Presenter: Pratik Patel, Chair, Information Access Committee, Fresh Meadows, New York.      

B.         2:05 to 2:50: Customizing ZoomText for comfort and Productivity.

Presenter: Stephanie L Rood MS Assistive Technology Studies and Human Services ATACP, Assistive Technology Instructor, Junior Blind of America, Los Angeles, California

Learn how you can customize ZoomText to work for your specific needs.

C.       2:50 to 3:35: Accessible Medical Equipment and Accessible Apps.  Presenter: Daren Burton, American Foundation for the Blind, Virginia

Learn about accessible medical equipment and what constitutes accessible apps.

D.       3:35 to 4:10: Accessible Equipment for Your Kitchen and home. Presenters: members of the Information Access Committee

Come and “Look What’s Talking Now” to hear about some appliances/tools that you can use in your kitchen and around the house every day.

E.        4:10 to 4:30: A possible surprise and Q & A and General Feedback. Ask the IAC questions and provide feedback about your needs.

Sunday July 8, 2012 – 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

TITLE: Google Survey and Implications for Future Accessible Technologies

TICKETS: $0 preregistration; $0 at the door (by request of Google)

SHORT DESCRIPTION: Take part in a discussion about the survey results that ACB conducted in conjunction with Google last fall. Learn about what the results mean for future assistive technologies.

LONG DESCRIPTION:

TITLE: Google Survey and Implications for Future Accessible Technologies

Presenters: Naomi Black, Accessibility, Google, Inc. Mountain view, California

Philip Strain, usability researcher, Mountain view, California

Pratik Patel, Chair, Information Access Committee, ACB, Fresh Meadows, New York

  How do blind and visually impaired people use computers and mobile technologies today? Building on that question, ACB, in partnership with Google, conducted a survey in the fall of 2011. Come to hear about the results of that survey. The findings will be shared and a discussion will take place about the implications of these findings for future development of accessible technologies. We will also engage in a dialogue about future policy implications for ACB. What and how should we advocate for accessibility?

Monday, July 9

Joint Program of the Employment and Information Access committees: Social Networking for Business and Pleasure

2:45-4:00

Link into LinkedIn. Ray Campbell, independent consultant and formerly Adaptive Technology Specialist with the Chicago Lighthouse for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, will demonstrate how to get yourself noticed on LinkedIn using a PC and a screen reader.

4:15-5:30

Face up to Facebook. Brian Charlson, Director of Computer Training Services at the Carroll Center for the Blind, will show you how to get the most from Facebook using screen readers with a PC as well as with Mac and iOS devices.

Tuesday July 10, 2012 – Two afternoon sessions.

A joint program of the Information Access Committee and ACB Students

TITLE: Apple: An Introduction to Using a Touch Screen

TICKETS: $5 preregistration; No tickets at the door

NUMBER OF PEOPLE EXPECTED: 60 (per session maximum)

SHORT DESCRIPTION: By participating in a hands-on session, Learn from an Apple representative about how to use a touch screen device.

Long DESCRIPTION:

TITLE: Apple: An Introduction to Using a Touch Screen

Presenters: Sarah Herrlinger, Apple Corporation. Cupertino, California

Pratik Patel, Chair, Information Access Committee, ACB, Fresh Meadows, New York

This is a session for beginners that will introduce you to the best ways of using touch screen devices. If you have just purchased a touch screen based phone or device, come to this session to learn more. Maximize your productivity by learning through a guided tour.

Wednesday July 11, 2012 – tech session

TITLE: The British Invasion Goes Television

TICKETS: $5 preregistration; $7 at the door

SHORT DESCRIPTION: Accessible TV is a reality. See examples on Accessible TV from the U.K.

LONG DESCRIPTION:

TITLE: The British Invasion Goes Television

Presenters: Richard Orm, Royal National Institute for the Blind, United Kingdom.

Brian Charlson, Director, Computer Training Services, Carroll Center for the Blind. Boston, Massachusetts

 When it comes to accessible television, the UK is ahead of the US. Come

see what is possible as RNIB accessibility expert Richard Orme describes

and demonstrates what is available to blind and visually impaired

television viewers in the UK. You won’t believe your ears.

Thursday July 12 – focus groups

Title: Focus Groups With Barnes and Noble

Stay tuned for more information about focus groups from a new ACB partner. Provide feedback on emerging technologies for reading books.

Tech Sessions at the 2012 American Council of the Blind Conference and Convention #ACB12

Dear all,

This year, the Information Access Committee presents a rich variety of activities that you will be able to enjoy. These activities are popular; so, book early. Come one, come all. See below for descriptions.

Please note that our Tuesday sessions are limited to 60 people each and tickets must be purchased in advanced.

We look forward to seeing you at our events.

Warmest regards,

Pratik

Saturday July 7 – 2:00 PM to 4:30 PM

TITLE: 411 from the IAC

TICKETS: $5 preregistration; $7 at the door

SHORT DESCRIPTION: Come to hear about the latest on screen enlargement, accessible medical devices, and tech for  your kitchen.

LONG DESCRIPTION:

A.         2:00 to 2:05: Introduction - Presenter: Pratik Patel, Chair, Information Access Committee, Fresh Meadows, New York.      

B.         2:05 to 2:50: Customizing ZoomText for comfort and Productivity.

Presenter: Stephanie L Rood MS Assistive Technology Studies and Human Services ATACP, Assistive Technology Instructor, Junior Blind of America, Los Angeles, California

Learn how you can customize ZoomText to work for your specific needs.

C.       2:50 to 3:35: Accessible Medical Equipment and Accessible Apps.  Presenter: Daren Burton, American Foundation for the Blind, Virginia

Learn about accessible medical equipment and what constitutes accessible apps.

D.       3:35 to 4:10: Accessible Equipment for Your Kitchen and home. Presenters: members of the Information Access Committee

Come and “Look What’s Talking Now” to hear about some appliances/tools that you can use in your kitchen and around the house every day.

E.        4:10 to 4:30: A possible surprise and Q & A and General Feedback. Ask the IAC questions and provide feedback about your needs.

Sunday July 8, 2012 – 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

TITLE: Google Survey and Implications for Future Accessible Technologies

TICKETS: $0 preregistration; $0 at the door (by request of Google)

SHORT DESCRIPTION: Take part in a discussion about the survey results that ACB conducted in conjunction with Google last fall. Learn about what the results mean for future assistive technologies.

LONG DESCRIPTION:

TITLE: Google Survey and Implications for Future Accessible Technologies

Presenters: Naomi Black, Accessibility, Google, Inc. Mountain view, California

Philip Strain, usability researcher, Mountain view, California

Pratik Patel, Chair, Information Access Committee, ACB, Fresh Meadows, New York

  How do blind and visually impaired people use computers and mobile technologies today? Building on that question, ACB, in partnership with Google, conducted a survey in the fall of 2011. Come to hear about the results of that survey. The findings will be shared and a discussion will take place about the implications of these findings for future development of accessible technologies. We will also engage in a dialogue about future policy implications for ACB. What and how should we advocate for accessibility?

Monday, July 9

Joint Program of the Employment and Information Access committees: Social Networking for Business and Pleasure

2:45-4:00

Link into LinkedIn. Ray Campbell, independent consultant and formerly Adaptive Technology Specialist with the Chicago Lighthouse for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, will demonstrate how to get yourself noticed on LinkedIn using a PC and a screen reader.

4:15-5:30

Face up to Facebook. Brian Charlson, Director of Computer Training Services at the Carroll Center for the Blind, will show you how to get the most from Facebook using screen readers with a PC as well as with Mac and iOS devices.

Tuesday July 10, 2012 – Two afternoon sessions.

A joint program of the Information Access Committee and ACB Students

TITLE: Apple: An Introduction to Using a Touch Screen

TICKETS: $5 preregistration; No tickets at the door

NUMBER OF PEOPLE EXPECTED: 60 (per session maximum)

SHORT DESCRIPTION: By participating in a hands-on session, Learn from an Apple representative about how to use a touch screen device.

Long DESCRIPTION:

TITLE: Apple: An Introduction to Using a Touch Screen

Presenters: Sarah Herrlinger, Apple Corporation. Cupertino, California

Pratik Patel, Chair, Information Access Committee, ACB, Fresh Meadows, New York

This is a session for beginners that will introduce you to the best ways of using touch screen devices. If you have just purchased a touch screen based phone or device, come to this session to learn more. Maximize your productivity by learning through a guided tour.

Wednesday July 11, 2012 – tech session

TITLE: The British Invasion Goes Television

TICKETS: $5 preregistration; $7 at the door

SHORT DESCRIPTION: Accessible TV is a reality. See examples on Accessible TV from the U.K.

LONG DESCRIPTION:

TITLE: The British Invasion Goes Television

Presenters: Richard Orm, Royal National Institute for the Blind, United Kingdom.

Brian Charlson, Director, Computer Training Services, Carroll Center for the Blind. Boston, Massachusetts

 When it comes to accessible television, the UK is ahead of the US. Come

see what is possible as RNIB accessibility expert Richard Orme describes

and demonstrates what is available to blind and visually impaired

television viewers in the UK. You won’t believe your ears.

Thursday July 12 – focus groups

Title: Focus Groups With Barnes and Noble

Stay tuned for more information about focus groups from a new ACB partner. Provide feedback on emerging technologies for reading books.

I’ve been thinking about the future so much, lately; here I want all of this to go, and what I plan to do with this attention as long as it continues to grow the way it has been.

There’s so much I want to do.

I want to keep making Youtube videos and writing on social media about body image. I want to eventually start two podcasts, one where I talk about the latest news in the field of any progress made body image-wise (with modeling, advertising, that kind of stuff) and one where I have intimate one-on-one conversations with people about the most difficult thing they’ve ever had to do.

I want to become a public speaker, traveling the country and later the world giving talks at colleges, conferences, conventions and summits about body image, general vulnerability and how we need to fully embrace ourselves as human beings and realize the things we experience are valid and important if we want to make a better world.

I want to keep doing that and expanding my network, meeting with charities and learning more about areas where this kind of idea needs to be spread most.

Eventually, my end-goal is to create a giant nonprofit that combines organizations that focus on bullying prevention, music, art and dancing as therapy, protecting oppressed young people and create a safe space for young people from childhood ranging all the way up to college age. I want free therapy and counseling for LGBTQIA youth, I want a place where young people with EDs can go to talk to each other, I want a place where teenagers worried about expressing themselves because of their gender or body type or ethnicity can just be who they are free of judgement, and I want it to be maintained by an actual organization so it doesn’t become underfunded or fall apart.

I want so much, but there’s so many things that seem lightyears away right now.

So I’m going to relax, focus on my immediate future and the trials ahead, and work towards the things i want to give the world.