confederate america

THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY

-Always mystify, mislead, and surprise the enemy, if possible, and when you strike and overcome him, never let up in the pursuit so long as your men have strength to follow…. The other rule is, never fight against heavy odds, if by any possible maneuvering you can hurl your own force on only a part, and that the weakest part, of your enemy and crush it. Such tactics will win every time, and a small army may thus destroy a large one in detail.

— 

“Stonewall” Jackson.

nytimes.com
New Orleans Begins Removing Confederate Monuments, Under Police Guard
Workers dressed in flak jackets, helmets and scarves to conceal their identities because of concerns about their safety removed a statute early on Monday.
By Christopher Mele

Three other statues – to Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and P.G.T. Beauregard and Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis – were to be removed in later days now that legal challenges have been overcome.

The city issued a statement overnight saying private funding had been obtained covering the cost of the removal of the four monuments.

“There’s a better way to use the property these monuments are on and a way that better reflects who we are,” New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said in an interview Sunday with The Associated Press.

But opponents of the removal of the monuments began a candlelight vigil very early Monday at the Davis statue, and things there got heated, WWL says.

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CSS Palmetto State (1862-1865)

CSS Palmetto State, a Richmond class ironclad ram built at Charleston, South Carolina, was commissioned in September 1862. On 31 January 1863, in one of the Confederate Navy’s few successful efforts against Union blockading forces, she joined her sister ship Chicora in an attack that disabled USS Keystone State and USS Mercedita. Though the blockade was not broken, it was clearly endangered by the two Confederate ironclads, neither of which was much injured in the action.

When U.S. Navy ironclads attacked Fort Sumter on 7 April 1863, and when some of Charleston’s defending batteries had to be evacuated on 6-7 September of that year, Palmetto State assisted in the successful Confederate operations. For most of the rest of the Civil War, she remained active in the Charleston vicinity. CSS Palmetto State was destroyed on 18 February 1865, when the city was evacuated.

Kerr Patent revolver

Designed by James Kerr c.1855 and manufactured c.1859-66 by the London Armoury Co. for the Confederate States of America.
.44 cap and ball 5-shot cylinder, single action.

The London Armoury Co. was so dependent on its CSA contracts that it was dissolved almost right after the end of the American Civil War.

Known as the “Bloody Tinth”, it was one of only two Irish Catholic regiments in the Confederate Army, although their elected officers were mostly Ulster-Scots Protestants.

They built Forts Henry and Donelson and then were captured and held in Camp Douglas Prison. Reconstituted, the 10th were deployed as sharpshooters through the tough campaigns at Chickamauga, Chattanooga and Atlanta.

The Regimental flag originally belonged to Company ’D’ of the Tennessee Home Guards (State Militia). It was outlined in Kelly Green on a light green background. A gold harp, maroon trim with white lettering; above the harp, “Sons of Erin”; below the harp “Where glory await you”.