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Kids Share Some F**ked Up Facts About The Confederate Flag

These kids are decrying the Confederate flag in the best way ever: by telling us all the horrible stuff it represents. In a video posted to YouTube Tuesday, a group of young boys and girls get together to express how fed up they are “with this whitewashing of America’s dark past.”

Watch the full video for all five f**ked up facts.

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SIGNAL BOOST: if you’re black and live in Gettysburg, please be careful!

Some racist got his Confederate flag burnt on his truck and his friends on Facebook are literally talking about lynching and shooting black people over it. One friend is even already targeting a neighbor to “check” out. Their comments are terrifying.

Please be safe from these racist, dangerous people!

My school district refuses to remove confederate symbols from my high school campus

I am a student at Robert E. Lee high school in San Antonio, Texas. When you walk into Robert E. Lee high school, the first thing you will see is a giant statue of Robert E. Lee. Imagine being an African American student and having to walk into school every day looking at a man who fought for the enslavement of your ancestors. Robert E. Lee high school is the oldest school in the North East Independent School district. The school mascot is a “volunteer” appearing in a red and gray confederate army uniform and looking a lot like Robert himself. The school colors are red and gray which are the confederate colors. The pep squad is called the “confederettes”, The JV drill team is called the “dixie drillers” and the varsity dance team is called the “rebel rousers”.  Progress this summer was made when two confederate emblems were removed from the campus. This summer, a peer of mine, Kayla Wilson, sought to get rid of all confederate symbols from my school and change the name. At first, the district wouldn’t even put the name change up for discussion. After a long battle of board meetings and a petition with over 11,000 people, the school board voted not to change anything about my school. “Dec 11, 2015 — On Monday night NEISD Board voted NOT to rename Robert E Lee H.S . Board Trustee Wheat pleaded with fellow Board members to give the students and faculty an opportunity to voice their opinion and grievances. He requested a committee made up of teachers, administrators, and community to do surveys, obtain facts, and submit alternate names. He stated"we have not done enough to make this decision". Board Trustee White gave his testimony, as a African American the name offended him, and “we should not have to constantly defend the name of our schools for someone who is so controversial”. White reiterated Robert E Lee was the general of the confederacy, and fought to continue slavery. 


Superintendent Gottardy and Board Trustees Grona, Bresnahan, Hughey, and Perkins stated they had done enough research to make this decision and felt burdened to continue any additional effort. Board Trustee Perkins mocked Trustee Wheat attempt to add the voices of the students , teachers, and PTA.

The board meeting ended with an item being place on the Agenda to look into all symbol, icons, and songs tied to the confederacy. This Agenda item will be reviewed in the spring.

Please review the video below and review the response of the Board members. Unlike other communities like , Houston, Austin, Princeton, UT and even Robert E Lee’s Washington and Lee University recommended a discussion.

San Antonio NEISD refused discussion. Board Trustees did not feel the voice of its students or faculty matter for this decision.

Please email your Board Members why community matters. Why facts are important. Please tell them ALL are children voices’ matter.”

Robert E Lee was a confederate who fought for the enslavement of black people in the United States. He fought to maintain the continued subjugation of Blacks in America’s south. My school district perpetuates a racist culture by keeping racist symbols on my campus. 

The dance team and cheerleader coach threatened to their students that if the name change was posted about on social media or talked about at school, girls would be kicked off the team immediately. 

Faculty members were fired for talking about it on social media as well. 

The petition didn’t make a difference. The school board meeting didn’t make a difference. Very few individuals in San Antonio, Texas want to change the school name to make African American students comfortable. 

PLEASE MAKE THIS POST GO VIRAL SO WE CAN CHANGE THE NAME OF MY HIGH SCHOOL AND REMOVE ALL CONFEDERATE SYMBOLS!

anonymous asked:

Alright, I need a stable argument to argue why the Confederate flag is racist because people on Facebook are just being SO STUPID I'M DEAD INSIDE

In the declarations of secession from the Union, some Southern states expressly mentioned slavery as a reason for their departure.

“… an increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the institution of slavery, has led to a disregard of their obligations …” South Carolina wrote in its declaration.

The state of Mississippi aligned itself with slavery right off the top of its declaration:

“Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery – the greatest material interest of the world.”

Georgia named slavery in the second sentence of its declaration.

After the Civil War ended, the battle flag actually only turned up here and there only rarely – and only at events to commemorate fallen soldiers.

The only reason the flag exploded in popularity was during the fight for civil rights for black Americans, in the middle of the 20th century (You know, that whole civil rights movement?).

The first burst was in 1948. South Carolina politician Strom Thurmond ran for president under the newly founded States Rights Party, also known as the Dixiecrats. The party’s purpose was clear: “We stand for the segregation of the races,” said Article 4 of its platform.

At campaign stops, fans greeted Thurmond with American flags, state flags – and Confederate battle flags.

But desegregation progressed.

As it passed milestones like the Supreme Court ruling on Brown vs. Board of Education, which gave black American children access to all schools, the Confederate battle flag popped up more and more as a protest against the civil rights being rightfully given to people of color.

So yeah, the confederate flag is incredibly racist.

2000 - The burning of the confederate flag took place on June 17, 2000 in Newark, NJ, and was organized by People’s Organization for Progress. 

This was in response to the then-controversy of South Carolina’s flying of the Confederate flag atop of their statehouse dome. In July 2000, two weeks after this video was shot, the flag was finally taken down amid pressure. [video]

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April 9th 1865: The American Civil War ends

On this day in 1865, 150 years ago, Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union general Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia, thus ending the civil war that had ravaged America since 1861. Sectional tensions over slavery, which had existed since the nation’s founding, came to boiling point with the election of the anti-slavery Republican Abraham Lincoln as president in 1860. The outraged Southern states feared the government would attempt to emancipate their slaves, whose labour provided the basis for the Southern economy, and thus seceded to form the Confederate States of America. Hopes for peace were dashed when shots were fired upon the Union Fort Sumter in April 1861, and the nation descended into civil war. The Confederacy, largely led by General Lee, initially had great success and defeated the Union in key battles including at Manassas and Fredericksburg. However, the Union’s superior resources and infrastructure ultimately turned the tide of war in their favour, crushing the Confederates at Gettysburg and with the destruction of Sherman’s march to the sea. Lee surrendered to Grant when hope of Confederate victory was lost, though Grant - out of respect for Lee and his desire for peaceful reconciliation -  defied military tradition and allowed Lee to keep his sword and horse. While more armies and generals had yet to surrender, Lee’s surrender essentially marked the end of the deadliest war in American history, which left around 750,000 dead. Union victory ensured the abolition of slavery, opening up questions about what was to be the fate of the four million freedpeople. These debates, as well as how to treat the seceded states and how to negotiate their readmission into the Union, defined the challenges of the postwar Reconstruction era. The Civil War remains a pivotal moment in American history and in many ways, 150 years later, the nation is still struggling to unite the sections and cope with the legacy of slavery. 

“The Confederates were now our countrymen, and we did not want to exult over their downfall.”
- Grant upon Lee’s surrender

150 years ago

"The Second Civil War"

My boyfriend and I live in South Carolina. He lives in Powdersville and I live in Anderson. We are both black. We were hanging out yesterday. He had a lot of errands to run, so we were out and about. Yesterday, I saw more Confederate Flags that I have ever seen in my life. I always thought that the only people who displayed Confederate Flags like that were rednecks who lived in the deep South. That was how often I’d seen Confederate Flags. Lately, I’ve been sensing a certain coldness from the white people in my town. A few days ago, there was a huge rally for the Confederate Flag. They went to several different Walmarts in the upstate of South Carolina rallying for that terrible flag, including a Walmart in Powdersville and Anderson. It was all over the news. Pictures of white people waving that flag like they were proud. Disgusting. Yesterday, after seeing more Confederate Flags than I had ever in my life, my boyfriend and I began talking about how disgusted we were. He then said, “This is the second civil war, babe. They’re just gonna lose again, though.” I’m really scared. White people in my town are showing their true colors. The south isn’t safe. South Carolina isn’t safe. And you ask me “Why only black tumblr?” Or “Why only Black People?”

New Social Studies Textbooks In Texas Do Not Mention KKK Or Jim Crow Laws

New Social Studies Textbooks In Texas Do Not Mention KKK Or Jim Crow Laws

We saw it coming. We knew it was nearly inevitable. First, it was creationism in Biology textbooks. Then, it was the battle for Moses in the Social Studies textbooks, which included teaching right-wing political views as history. And finally, they’ve successfully done the impossible. The Washington Post is reporting that this fall, over five million public school students will be taught using…

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Confederate Symbolism in the Flags of the American South

Thought I’d do a slightly different post today. There’s been a lot more awareness recently of what the Confederate flag truly represents, and I think that’s a good thing. It’s an odious symbol and I think it’s important for it to be removed from public life.

But with all the obvious examples of Confederate flags (your statehouses and bumper stickers and what have you) it can be easy to miss some of the deeper, more buried Confederate imagery lingering on in the South. Case in point, the state flags. Nearly all of the former Confederate states have flags that can be clearly traced back to the Civil War. Some are directly from the era and some are just based on flags from that era, but the Confederate connection is always pretty clear once you know what you’re looking for.

Would there even be a strong tradition of state flags anywhere in America if not for the Civil War? I’m honestly not sure. There were a handful of antebellum examples, but it was secession from the Union that prompted the creation of most of the earliest state flags. Would these states have seen a need to symbolically distance themselves from the federal government if they hadn’t been pursuing this white supremacist mission?

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support  #NoFlaggingChallenge! #Love it!

#love and hate #loveandhate #l&h #Hate it! #Love it! #hate #love #hate it #love it

I don’t think that symbol deserves the dignity of debate. It’s a flag of treason, and it’s a flag of hatred.
—  Bree Newsome, the activist who scaled a 30-foot flagpole on South Carolina’s state Capitol to remove the Confederate flag. Tune in to Democracy Now! for an extended interview with Newsome.