6

Kids Share Some F**ked Up Facts About The Confederate Flag

These kids are decrying the Confederate flag in the best way ever: by telling us all the horrible stuff it represents. In a video posted to YouTube Tuesday, a group of young boys and girls get together to express how fed up they are “with this whitewashing of America’s dark past.”

Watch the full video for all five f**ked up facts.

anonymous asked:

Alright, I need a stable argument to argue why the Confederate flag is racist because people on Facebook are just being SO STUPID I'M DEAD INSIDE

In the declarations of secession from the Union, some Southern states expressly mentioned slavery as a reason for their departure.

“… an increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the institution of slavery, has led to a disregard of their obligations …” South Carolina wrote in its declaration.

The state of Mississippi aligned itself with slavery right off the top of its declaration:

“Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery – the greatest material interest of the world.”

Georgia named slavery in the second sentence of its declaration.

After the Civil War ended, the battle flag actually only turned up here and there only rarely – and only at events to commemorate fallen soldiers.

The only reason the flag exploded in popularity was during the fight for civil rights for black Americans, in the middle of the 20th century (You know, that whole civil rights movement?).

The first burst was in 1948. South Carolina politician Strom Thurmond ran for president under the newly founded States Rights Party, also known as the Dixiecrats. The party’s purpose was clear: “We stand for the segregation of the races,” said Article 4 of its platform.

At campaign stops, fans greeted Thurmond with American flags, state flags – and Confederate battle flags.

But desegregation progressed.

As it passed milestones like the Supreme Court ruling on Brown vs. Board of Education, which gave black American children access to all schools, the Confederate battle flag popped up more and more as a protest against the civil rights being rightfully given to people of color.

So yeah, the confederate flag is incredibly racist.

New Social Studies Textbooks In Texas Do Not Mention KKK Or Jim Crow Laws

New Social Studies Textbooks In Texas Do Not Mention KKK Or Jim Crow Laws

We saw it coming. We knew it was nearly inevitable. First, it was creationism in Biology textbooks. Then, it was the battle for Moses in the Social Studies textbooks, which included teaching right-wing political views as history. And finally, they’ve successfully done the impossible. The Washington Post is reporting that this fall, over five million public school students will be taught using…

View On WordPress

dailykos.com
The Confederacy is not our heritage
I grew up in Kentucky barely 30 miles from the Jefferson Davis Monument. I've strolled the cemeteries full of time-rounded headstones and walked the battlefields where uniform buttons and the pale oxidized lumps of Minie balls still peek from the ground after a hard rain. I've watched reenactors run screaming over hills and heard the gut-punch thump of a period canon fired in memorial at sunset. But the Confederacy is not my heritage. It's not anyone's heritage. The Confederacy is our shame. In the whole of the Confederacy, there is not one thing to be proud of. Not the men. Not their actions. Certainly not the ideals.

I grew up in Kentucky barely 30 miles from the Jefferson Davis Monument. I’ve strolled the cemeteries full of time-rounded headstones and walked the battlefields where uniform buttons and the pale oxidized lumps of Minie balls still peek from the ground after a hard rain. I’ve watched reenactors run screaming over hills and heard the gut-punch thump of a period canon fired in memorial at sunset.

But the Confederacy is not my heritage. It’s not anyone’s heritage. The Confederacy is ourshame. In the whole of the Confederacy, there is not one thing to be proud of. Not the men. Not their actions. Certainly not the ideals.

You’ll see people today proclaiming that the Confederacy was launched over an issue of “state’s rights,” or on some esoteric principle. No. That idea didn’t even appear until decades after the hot portion of the Civil War turned into the cooler years that have followed. You’ll also see it expressed simply that the war was fought for slavery. But that’s not quite right, either.

The Confederacy was launched not on a platform of slavery, but on a foundation of racism. That it maintained slavery as an institution was a feature. That it upheld racism was thedesign. Read the words of Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens, speaking at the Athenaeum in Savannah, Georgia:

The new Constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institutions—African slavery as it exists among us—the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution. Jefferson, in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the “rock upon which the old Union would split.” He was right. What was conjecture with him, is now a realized fact. But whether he fully comprehended the great truth upon which that rock stood and stands, may be doubted. The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old Constitution were, that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with; but the general opinion of the men of that day was, that, somehow or other, in the order of Providence, the institution would be evanescent and pass away. … Those ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the equality of races. This was an error. It was a sandy foundation, and the idea of a Government built upon it—when the “storm came and the wind blew, it fell.”

Our new Government is founded upon exactly the opposite ideas; its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and moral condition.

… look with confidence to the ultimate universal acknowledgement of the truths upon which our system rests? It is the first government ever instituted upon the principles in strict conformity to nature, and the ordination of Providence, in furnishing the materials of human society. Many governments have been founded upon the principle of the subordination and serfdom of certain classes of the same race; such were and are in violation of the laws of nature. Our system commits no such violation of nature’s laws.

Head below the fold for just a reminder of what that all means.

Read that again.

• The Founding Fathers accepted slavery into the Union, but believed it was both evil and on its way out.

• The Confederacy was founded on the idea that “all men are created equal” is “fundamentally wrong.”

• The Confederacy has its “cornerstone” entirely on racial inequality.

• The Confederacy was “founded upon exactly the opposite ideas” of the United States.

This isn’t the voice of some latter-day apologist who dreamed up noble phrases to paint over events of the time. This is the reality. This is what the men who carried out this treason believed. This is what the men who carried out this treason said. This is what the men who carried out this treason acted to achieve.

There is, in the whole Confederate enterprise, not one admirable notion. Is it part of our history? Yes, it is, to our everlasting shame. It’s a part of our history the same way that the apartheid state is a part of South African history. It’s a part of our history the same way that the Nazi Reich is a part of German history. It’s a part of our history that should embarrass us.

It’s the part of our history in which traitors who not only didn’t believe in the American union, but also didn’t believe in the basic ideals of America, formed a state whose core was nothing less than pure racism.

It should be no more acceptable to wave a Confederate flag in the United States than it is to fly a swastika. No more acceptable to proclaim yourself sympathetic to the Confederate cause than to proclaim yourself a supporter of ISIS. There is no moral difference. None. These are the banners of the enemies of our nation and of our ideals—enemies whose existence is based on inequality and subjugation.

Romanticizing these causes isn’t admirable, it’s an illness.

h/t: Mark Sumner at Daily Kos

Goddamn it, for the last time, the Civil War was about slavery. I don’t care what your history buff Civil War reenacting great uncle told you or your ill-informed high school history teacher taught you about the war being over states’ rights or a fear of the federal government. Your teacher was wrong and your Texas-approved textbook probably was too.

If the Civil War was about the rights of states, it was those rights which specifically included the enslavement and dehumanization of an entire race for profit. The secession and subsequent war were primarily motivated by the southern lawmakers wanting to maintain slavery. This is as much an argument among modern historians as climate change is among climatologists. 

Here’s just a sampling of three secession declarations:

From South Carolina’s secession declaration (1860): “An increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the institution of slavery, has led to a disregard of their obligations. … A geographical line has been drawn across the Union, and all the States north of that line have united in the election of a man to the high office of President of the United States, whose opinions and purposes are hostile to slavery. He is to be entrusted with the administration of the common Government, because he has declared that that ‘Government cannot endure permanently half slave, half free,’ and that the public mind must rest in the belief that slavery is in the course of ultimate extinction. … On the 4th day of March next, this [Republican] party will take possession of the Government. It has announced that the South shall be excluded from the common territory, that the judicial tribunals shall be made sectional, and that a war must be waged against slavery until it shall cease throughout the United States.”

From Mississippi’s secession declaration (1861): “Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery–the greatest material interest of the world. … Its labor supplies the product which constitutes by far the largest and most important portions of the commerce of the earth. … A blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization. … [The federal government] advocates negro equality, socially and politically, and promotes insurrection.

Or how about Texas? (1861): "We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.”

And from the Confederate constitution: “In all such territory the institution of negro slavery, as it now exists in the Confederate States, shall be recognized and protected by Congress and by the Territorial government; and the inhabitants of the several Confederate States and Territories shall have the right to take to such Territory any slaves lawfully held by them in any of the States or Territories of the Confederate States.”

Again, it may seem like there is room for interpretation because people keep arguing otherwise… but that’s because they are stupid. And stupid people tend to shout stupid things loudly.

So make sure you’re louder.

youtube

This unassuming house in Petersburg, Va., has an odd history. It was constructed from the tombstones of Union soldiers who had besieged the city in 1864. The Union soldiers who died while attacking the Confederate-held city were buried near where they fell. Apparently to save on maintenance, nearly 2,000 marble headstones were removed from Poplar Grove Cemetery and sold to a Mr. O.E. Young, who assembled them into a two-story house in the 1930s.

The tombstones face inward, so “as the owner lay in bed the names of the dead stood about his head,” Headley wrote in Architectural Follies in America (1996). Later they were plastered over so visitors wouldn’t be freaked out – or accidentally see their great-grandfathers’ name.

The last word must be left to the lady living next door to the Tombstone House, who confessed “Ah dont rightly see what all the fuss was about. They was jist Union boys.”

Road remembrance: Traveling along the names of the Confederacy

To see the complicated legacy of Confederate symbolism in the United States, you need only look at the roads on which we travel. In addition to monuments and schools, we get from place to place on such roads as Jefferson Davis Highway (US-1 in Virginia) and Calhoun Memorial Highway (US-123) in South Carolina.

The map below shows the sheer number of roads that take their names from Confederate history. We included 25 prominent generals and politician John C. Calhoun, who died in 1850 but was such an influence and symbol in the South that his face graced Confederate currency.

To: Everyone waving a Confederate flag and saying “Heritage not hate”

Your heritage is hate. End of story.

And before you reflexively say “It wasn’t about slavery!”

1. Yes it was. Multiple states specifically cited slavery among their reasons for secession. Attempting to solely focus on “the good parts”, or justifying the bad things (slavery was the norm!) is not flattering, denial makes you look more guilty.

The Nazis did a lot of great things for Germany. They were environmentalists, they did a lot for animal rights, but that good can’t erase the evil acts they committed.

2. I’m not just talking about slavery. For all of the blistering rhetoric I hear from people about “If so-and-so wins I’m moving to another country!”, the Confederacy took it a step further and said “Fuck this, we’re going to become another country!”

They hated America so much they wanted to cut ties and become an independent nation. They hated America so much they started a war

And I know, some of the soldiers had their own reasons, completely devoid of hatred, or racism, having nothing to do with slavery. But there were Nazis who had their own reasons too. Nazis who had no choice. The Pope before Benedict was a Nazi youth. But what would you think if you saw a picture of the Pope waving a Nazi flag and saying “Heritage not hate”? Symbols have context and no matter how hard you try that context is inextricable.

It comes down to accepting culpability. Robert E. Lee, the general whose flag is the one most prominently used to represent the Confederacy, said that it represented treason and should be put away. If you’re not willing to listen to the man who fought under that flag and was willing to die for it - the man for whom that flag is lit·er·al·ly his heritage - then maybe you have ulterior motives and “Heritage not hate” is just a facade.

The Nazi flag was banned across Europe, so do you know what neo-Nazis and white supremacists use to represent their hatred and bigotry? The Confederate flag. When you wave a flag that is used across the world by racists to represent their hatred for minorities, you forfeit the right to get offended if someone assumes that you’re racist too. The number of people who wave it for “innocent, non-racist” reasons are a fraction of the number of people who display it with pride.