conf: characters

I neglected to draw the first Rightstick campaign group, but this group is so great, I had to do it ASAP. These four are the characters in the Rightstick GURPS Campaign, “Goodbye Blue Sky”, as GM’d by @wolfram-william, and taking place in a magically-influenced steampunk/victorian era.

First off is my character, (Sir/Lt.) Inglenook, the “protective father” of the group. A mechanical body with a human soul and heavy firepower. He cares about his friends and strives to protect the people and things he loves in the best way he can.

(Sgt) Calvin / ”Mach” is @sage-of-the-elements‘s character, a mage/mechanic… or “maganic” if you will. Like Inglenook, a member of the military. He also functions as Inglenook’s personal mechanic – which is handy!

Hewie is @nevermorenot’s snarky merchant pigeon tengu. The token troublemaker of the group. He’s sneaky, impulsive, and often untrustworthy, but he’s hella fun to keep around (and Inglenook appreciates him all the same).

Geo is @catcomixzstudios​‘s character; the big, lovable, gullible, daft, hedge wizard, whom we suspect to be the missing link. Geo and Hewie make a perfect “Brains + Brawn” combo.

[PS: I designed Mach for his player, but Hewie and Geo were originally designed/drawn by their respective players]

Stereotyped Characters
  • "This asshole": questionable morals, hidden objective, villain, etc.
  • My son: precious cin/sinnamon roll
  • My husband: strong, badass, deep voice
  • "You.": terrible, usually a villain, long hair
6

Gang of Super Heroes - meet The Dream Team!

xD

Wanted to do some nice and ironic heroes - though Sun Ray (based on the most awesomest Grace Jones) turned out pretty fierce ;)

Lord of the Hammers: I’m thinking he’ll be surprisingly feminine and with a smidge of Johnny Bravo attitude. Nothing like an annoying self-absorbed, overly narsicistic superhero. Will he save someone if it means upsetting the ‘do?

Daisy Diamond: the classic feminine blonde heroine. With muscles to fit how hardcore she really is! Nails ready to be broken. Bring it on!

Sun Ray: Probably the actual leader of the pack. You’ll think he’s the worker-bee soldier type. Nope, this lady is all sass and cunning! - obviously in the wonderful deadpan kind of way..

Miss Kitty Fantastic: - yea what would you peg her to be? I’m thinking she’ll not want to be labeled any time soon….

uuuh can’t wait to do up these guys in their civil wear - and of course their antagonist gang!

how to write a fat character

by: your local fat writer 

media seems to do such a terrible job at representing people like me and same goes for many fic writers who try to base their characters on these characters shown in media. Here are some basic do’s and and don’t’s to writing fat characters! 

DONT:

  • make your character in love with food- they’re allowed to eat like everyone else, but not every real fat person has an obsession over food. The rule can get iffy if your fat character is a cook.*
  • make your character the center of jokes- everyone has something “funny” about them, but don’t make your fat character constantly make jokes about their own weight. Fat people get enough bullshit from skinny people about their weight already. 
  • make your character incredibly unfit- there are real fat people who are incredibly athletic! their weight may be from genetics or from proper muscle building (not the muscle building we’re groomed to think is right in society). The choices your character makes is what affects their athleticism, not their weight 
  • make your character the Depressed One- yes, fat people do get upset over their body. Many go through horrible diets to try and get slim. It takes years for real fat people to get over it and realize their body is horrible gross. Their weight can simply be because of genetics, not because of how much they eat. 
  • make your character’s arc about things involving their weight- unless your fat character ABSOLUTELY needs to involve food, don’t make this their entire character arc. There are so many cooler things you can do with your character; sexuality, friends/family, simplifying the heroes journey, etc. make your character exciting! make them relatable! 
  • make your character the token fat character- the real world has many types of people, the fantasy world should not be too different from this fact. Your characters should always show diversity, and sometimes repetition is good when its the right character type. 

*making your fat character a chef can be a risky move. think about why your fat character is a chef. was it because they’re the fat character? or is there something that influenced them to become a chef? choose your answer carefully

DO:

  • make your character’s interests diverse- I like food! but i also like many other things! video games, bike riding, painting, singing, give your character varying interests! maybe your character has that one thing they love above all else. the game Fire Emblem: Awakening has always been my go-to favorite thing, what’s your character’s?
  • make your character an individual- develop their personality! how would your character react to seeing the ASPCA commercials? What’s their reaction when a family member dies? When their favorite artist is performing in town? Are there songs that make them emotional? What do they do to de-stress? Do they stim? There’s PLENTY you can say about your character that isn’t just “I love food.”
  • make your character as realistic as possible- just as skinny people are diverse, so are fat people. When you’re describing a fat character, don’t default to “pear shaped.” there are proportionate and disproportionate fat people. maybe they have fatter thighs than they do calves, their stomach pops out but they don’t have “bingo wings,” maybe their chin does that weird thing or maybe it doesn’t (this happens to skinny people, too!). and don’t forget stretch marks. they are real and they are not “taboo.”
  • write your character as if they’re like any other- it all boils down to one thing: the similarities and differences. I’m an XL and my friend is an XS, we both enjoy oversized hoodies! She would wear hoodies in the summer but I would rather walk around shirtless (if society didn’t tell us boobs are bad.) I would never wear short shorts when exercising because they ride up my thighs. Your fat character can act just the same as your skinny one(s).
  • Me, at the all purpose antagonist counter: Hey, so I need a typical minor villain to be my antagonist’s minion. Gruff, middle aged, cruel, ugly, probably smelly too. Just get me whatever villain-coded extra you've got a lot of.
  • The shop owner, immediately shoving a character at me: Here's your order of one young, beautiful, tortured soul in desperate need of love and a solid redemption arch, complete with puppy-dog eyes and nice hair. No refunds, no returns. Have fun.

anonymous asked:

What kinds of scenes could I include in my story that would involve developing character relationships? I have this problem of having characters seemingly pop into the plot when the scene calls for it, but then they disappear for long periods of time, and these characters SHOULD be seen more often than they are. What can I do to involve my characters more?

Involving Minor Characters More

I will apologize in advance because this post is a bit metaphor heavy, but I think the metaphors really help in explaining the involvement of “minor” characters. So the question here is: How do I develop character relationships when one character only appears sporadically?

DON’T use the characters merely as “coffee breaks” from the main plot. 

If these characters are popping up routinely following major action sequences or plot movements, you might be guilty of doing this. Scenes like this are often seen as “filler” because they act as a reprieve from the intensity of the plot. These scenes are often stretches of dialogue that have no bearing on the main conflict of the story, and may even include bantering and humor. Scenes like this are often forgiven in stories because they serve to develop relationships between characters or even explore subplots or character backstories, but if your character is only popping up in these instances, then their presence starts to become awkward. 

Imagine you worked in an office, and all morning everyone is milling about, working hard, making deadlines. One worker finishes up a task and decides to take a coffee break and hits up the staff lounge. And regardless of when they take this break, every time they go in there, there’s some joker just sitting in a comfy chair, chilling out and waiting for the actual workers to come by and see them. 

This person engages the workers in mindless chatter to give them a break from the mental and sometimes physical strain of their jobs, and then when everyone goes back to work, they’re still just sitting there, waiting. Until someone else finishes up a rough assignment and comes by for a break. This whole setup is a bit odd.

These characters can still be part of the “coffee breaks” of your story, especially if the conversations they have help to define their relationships with others and explore their pasts. But for them to be important characters to your story, they should accompany the main characters back to the office, or at the very least head up to their own floor to do some productive work of their own. Otherwise they shouldn’t even be in the workplace (the story) to begin with.  

DO increase their involvement in the plot

What is the main conflict of your story? If you’re not sure how to answer this question, then work on figuring that out before you worry about how you’ll develop their relationships. They need to have reasons to interact, and if you feel as though you don’t have very many of those reasons as of now, then it’s possible that this disappearing character doesn’t have much stake in your story’s conflict. 

Think about all possible outcomes of your conflict - both the potential happy endings or sad endings, and then ask yourself how these outcomes affect this disappearing character. What is at stake for them? If they have no personal interest in what is going on with the main character, then you’ll want to give them a reason to care. Give them something to lose (or something to win, assuming a positive outcome). 

Think of it this way. If your story’s conflict were a sporting event, your main cast of characters should all be players on at least one of the teams. Your secondary, or minor, characters can be spectators, but they should have something at stake in the game, such as a bet on the outcome, or even just a strong allegiance to one of the teams. If they have a stake, they’re not going to just Google the score later. They’ll want to be there to see what happens, to yell their outrage or cheer their joy. To show their support, or possibly heckle the opposing side in hopes that they’ll screw up. 

Give them a motivation that’s related to all the stuff you’ve got going on in your scenes. If these disappearing characters are absent from many of the scenes, you have to ask why? If they’re not involved, then make them involved. Give them a role, or remove them from the story entirely. 

DO imagine their lives apart from the protagonist.

If you’re struggling to find a role for the character in the conflict, then try thinking about what they’re doing in all that time off screen. Brainstorm their own personal journeys. What are they working towards? What are their obstacles? Thinking about these questions in the context of the world or story universe you’ve created may trigger something that ultimately ties back to the main conflict. 

Thinking about this also creates some depth for your character. Going back to my very first example (our joker in the staff lounge), it’s possible that this joker is actually working while everyone is coming in and out. Maybe they’re tidying up, preparing snacks for everyone, working on projects in a notepad, making phone calls, or fixing a broken microwave or refrigerator. Maybe there’s more to this character, but we never know because they drop everything the moment a worker (or main character) stops by. 

And let’s keep going: imagine that this habit causes their work to suffer, because they’re sacrificing their own needs for the needs of the staff that come by seeking their company. How does that affect them, and can you think of ways to bring it to the forefront? Could the workers notice? Could the disappearing character disappear at a moment the MC relies on them to be there the most? What happens as a result? 

If you consider the character important enough that developing their relationship with an MC is of concern to you, then they should be important enough to work into the main plot in some form or another. 

I hope my lengthy metaphors were helpful! Good luck and happy writing :)

-Rebekah

a-weird-rusted-android  asked:

Hello! There is this fantasy world I'm making where a lot of the magic used would be some kind of dark magic (like necromancy, blood rituals and so on). This doesn't necessarily have negative implications in-world but I was wondering, would it be best to leave my POC characters out of these practices? I know there are negative stereotypes involved with magic for certain groups, but would this be alright if I tried to avoid those stereotypes and also have white characters use magic?

Characters of Color involved in “Dark Magic”

We wouldn’t think it fair to leave PoC and other marginalized people out of the magic use besides the cases where magic conflicts due to ethnicity, stereotypes, or religion. 

Some Magic Conflicts to Avoid:

If the magic use is evenly and diversely distributed, it’s probably fine, so have some characters of a given race use “dark” magic and other characters of the same race use other kinds of magic.  As long as you avoid magic for those groups that do object to it, and magic that has some kind of damaging stereotype associated with it, like Black characters doing Hollywood voodoo (We’ve discussed voodoo representation here a lot) or Indian-type characters doing some Temple of Doom monkey-brain eating s**t. 

In short, go for even distribution, and have sensitivity for certain groups where this would apply. 

–WWC

lukastarkiller  asked:

im working on a story that retells 3 classic children's stories, and one of them is peter pan. i am wondering if i could have some advice on which of these options would be the best for making the usage of tiger lily not racist: 1 eliminating the native tribe entirely and not using her, 2 making them into aliens or amazons or some other fantasy element, or 3 eliminating the native tribe but making tiger lily a lost boy (other lost boys are female and poc as well, so it wouldn't be strange)

Retelling Tiger Lily

There’s option 4: picking a Tribe to research and represent and not being afraid to do it and do it right.  I’ve never seen a modern-day adaptation of Peter Pan have the cojones to actually pick up Tiger Lily and do her justice and maintain that she is Indigenous. 

Last year, Pan tried the route of making Tiger Lily & co. straight-up non-Native and a fantasy culture and in fact drew from Mongolian inspiration for elements like her headdress. This choice received boatloads of criticism for stripping away a Tiger Lily that could have been, including from Native American outlets such as Indian Country Today Media Network. Why not write the Tiger Lily that should have been? Neverland is described as a coastal/tropical area, with the pirates and the mermaids and so on,  and there is a wealth of coastal Native cultures to pick from.

- Rodriguez