conceived-in-liberty

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war … testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated … can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that this nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate … we can not consecrate … we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us … that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion … that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain … that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom … and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Abraham Lincoln - November 19, 1863

To honor our fallen, we cannot ever say it too many times to those who survived: thank you for your sacrifices.

What we remember

Victor Davis Hanson at The Wall Street Journal:

“The shared ordeal of the Civil War, with some 650,000 fatalities, would eventually demand a unified national day of remembrance. Memorial Day began as an effort to square the circle in honoring America’s dead—without privileging the victors or their cause. The approach of the summer holidays seemed the most appropriate moment to heal our civic wounds. The timing suggested renewal and continuity, whereas an autumn or winter date might add unduly to the grim lamentation of the day.

But could the distinctions so crucial to war itself really be suppressed? Consider the themes of the two greatest speeches in the history of Western oratory: Pericles’ long Funeral Oration for the Athenian dead of the first year of the Peloponnesian War, delivered in 431 B.C. and amounting to some 3,000 words in most translations; and nearly 2,300 years later, President Abraham Lincoln’s 272-word Gettysburg Address of 1863.

Both statesmen agree that the mere words of the present generation cannot do justice to the sacrifice of the fallen young. Lincoln sees the talking and the living as less authentic commemorators than the mute dead: “We can not consecrate—we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract.”

Pericles argues that even a notable such as himself has almost no right to assess the sacrifices of the dead: “I could have wished that the reputations of many brave men were not to be imperiled in the mouth of a single individual, to stand or fall according as he spoke well or ill.”

By their ultimate sacrifice—what Lincoln calls ‘the last full measure of devotion’—the mute war dead argue that even heroic men are less important than the eternal values of freedom and democracy that ‘shall not perish from the earth.’ Such chauvinism assumes that democracies are by nature superior to the alternatives. Thus to Pericles, Athens was the ‘school of Hellas’ and for Lincoln America was ‘a new nation, conceived in Liberty.’”

Rules and tips for dating a hockey player:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Today’s the Day

It’s been a long journey, but I’ve arrived at an oasis in my life story. A place to unpack my load and rest a while.

I’ve discovered a deeply rich tradition, preserved and died for by courageous martyrs and perseverant revolutionaries. A firm foundation on which has been built a temple for the Lord. And God willing, that great cathedral will weather every single storm that dare blows against it.

That great faith that began in an upper room among people whose holy fervor was mistaken for drunkenness. That great faith that endured over a thousand years of conquests, shifts of power, and exploitation. That great faith that sprung up from among the Reformers, was refined by holy men and nourished by their blood of martyrdom until it transformed Great Britain. That great faith which swept across the world and inspired the creation of a new nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all are created equal. God willing that great faith called Anglicanism will endure until the Lord’s return!

Today’s the day.

Confirmation, here I come.

“Fourscore and 👏 seven 🔥 years 📅 ago 😅 our 💩 fathers brought forth, 🔛 on 🔛 this 👈 continent, 🌎 a 👌 new 👌 nation, 😺 conceived in 👏 liberty, 🗽 and 👏 dedicated to 💦 the 👏 proposition that 😐 all 💯 men 🚹 are 🔢 created 💯 equal. 👌 Now 👋 we 👥 are 🔢 engaged in 👏 a 👌 great 👍 civil 💉 war, 🔫 testing whether 🌩 that 😐 nation, 😺 or 💁 any 💦 nation 😺 so 💯 conceived, and 👏 so 💯 dedicated, can 💦 long 🍆 endure. We 👥 are 🔢 met 👄 on 🔛 a 👌 great 👍 battle-field of 💦 that 😐 war. 🔫 We 👥 have 👏 come 💦 to 💦 dedicate a 👌 portion of 💦 that 😐 field, 🖼 as 🍑 a 👌 final 👈 resting-place for 🍆 those 🐥 who 😂 here 👏 gave 🎁 their 🍆 lives, 📴 that 😐 that 😐 nation 😺 might 🔍 live. 🙅 It 💯 is 💦 altogether fitting and 👏 proper that 😐 we 👥 should 💘 do 👌 this. 👈 But, 🍑 in 👏 a 👌 larger sense, 💰 we 👥 cannot 🚫 dedicate, we 👥 cannot 🚫 consecrate—we cannot 🚫 hallow—this ground. 😫 The 👏 brave men, 🚹 living 🐙 and 👏 dead, 💀 who 😂 struggled here, 👏 have 👏 consecrated it 💯 far 🌌 above 🔝 our 💩 poor 💸 power 💪 to 💦 add 😰 or 💁 detract. The 👏 world 🌎 will 👏 little 👌 note, 📝 nor 🙅 long 🍆 remember 💭 what 😦 we 👥 say 🗣 here, 👏 but 🍑 it 💯 can 💦 never 🙅 forget 😊 what 😦 they 👥 did 👏 here. 👏 It 💯 is 💦 for 🍆 us 👨 the 👏 living, 🐙 rather, 👉 to 💦 be 🐝 dedicated here 👏 to 💦 the 👏 unfinished work 🏢 which 👏 they 👥 who 😂 fought here 👏 have 👏 thus far 🌌 so 💯 nobly advanced. 🎊 It 💯 is 💦 rather 👉 for 🍆 us 👨 to 💦 be 🐝 here 👏 dedicated to 💦 the 👏 great 👍 task remaining before 😂 us—that from 👉 these 👈 honored dead 💀 we 👥 take 👊 increased devotion to 💦 that 😐 cause 💋 for 🍆 which 👏 they 👥 here 👏 gave 🎁 the 👏 last 😍 full 🌝 measure 📐 of 💦 devotion—that we 👥 here 👏 highly resolve that 😐 these 👈 dead 💀 shall not 🚫 have 👏 died 💀 in 👏 vain—that this 👈 nation, 😺 under 😡 God, 😇 shall have 👏 a 👌 new 👌 birth 👑 of 💦 freedom, 🙌 and 👏 that 😐 government 💩 of 💦 the 👏 people, 👨 by 😈 the 👏 people, 👨 for 🍆 the 👏 people, 👨 shall not 🚫 perish from 👉 the 👏 earth.”

The Signs as Melania Trump Quotes

Aries: “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that ‘all men are created equal’”

Taurus: “Why, this car is auto-matic. It’s system-matic. Its hyyyyydro-matic. Why, it’s greased lightning!”

Gemini: “I’m sorry that people are so jealous of me. But I can’t help it that I’m popular”

Cancer: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character”

Leo: “Ohana means family. Family means nobody gets left behind or forgotten”

Virgo: “An eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind”

Libra: “Sometimes life is like this dark tunnel, you can’t always see the light at the end of the tunnel, but if you just keep moving, you will come to a better place”

Scorpio: I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity”

Sagittarius: “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt with the heart” 

Capricorn: “Think different”

Aquarius: “The first rule of Fight Club is you do not talk about Fight Club”

Pisces: “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country”

Everyone put your forehead in your palm

A not-so-innocent abroad: Trump bumbles across the Middle East - WaPo

“Four score and seven years ago — that’s a long time ago, very long — our fathers, who spoke about this at great length, did what perhaps has virtually never been done before: brought forth on this continent, a new nation, a very great new nation — there’s no question about that — conceived in liberty — and that is so important! — and dedicated to the amazing proposition — and they felt very strongly about this, I can tell you — that all men are created equal. Number one for me.”

theatlantic.com
The Myth of the Kindly General Lee
The legend of the Confederate leader’s heroism and decency is based in the fiction of a person who never existed.
By Adam Serwer

Lee is a pivotal figure in American history worthy of study. Neither the man who really existed, nor the fictionalized tragic hero of the Lost Cause, are heroes worthy of a statue in a place of honor. As one Union veteran angrily put it in 1903 when Pennsylvania was considering placing a statute to Lee at Gettysburg, “If you want historical accuracy as your excuse, then place upon this field a statue of Lee holding in his hand the banner under which he fought, bearing the legend: ‘We wage this war against a government conceived in liberty and dedicated to humanity.’” The most fitting monument to Lee is the national military cemetery the federal government placed on the grounds of his former home in Arlington.

To describe this man as an American hero requires ignoring the immense suffering for which he was personally responsible, both on and off the battlefield. It requires ignoring his participation in the industry of human bondage, his betrayal of his country in defense of that institution, the battlefields scattered with the lifeless bodies of men who followed his orders and those they killed, his hostility toward the rights of the freedmen and his indifference to his own students waging a campaign of terror against the newly emancipated. It requires reducing the sum of human virtue to a sense of decorum and the ability to convey gravitas in a gray uniform.

Four score 4️⃣⚽️ and seven7️⃣ years ago📅 our fathers 👬🍆 brought forth on this continent🌐🌎, a new nation, conceived in Liberty🇺🇸🗽, and dedicated💯💯 to the proposition that all men👴🏽👨🏻👨‍❤️‍👨 are created equal⚖🌗👍🏼.

Now we are engaged💖💍 in a great civil war🔫💣, testing📝📚 whether🌩☔️ that nation🇺🇸🙌🏼, or any nation🇨🇭🇦🇺🇧🇷 so conceived👶🏼💑 and so dedicated⏩🏋🏽, can long endure🏆‼️ We are met✌🏼️👯 on a great battle👾🎮field of that war🔫⚔. We have come to dedicate a portion📊 of that field🏕⭐️, as a final resting👷🏽💤 place for those who here gave🎁🛍 their lives that that nation might live⚡️‼️. It is altogether fitting👗💃🏽 and proper☕️👌🏻 that we should do this.💯🔥🙌🏼

But, in a larger sense❗️💯, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow🙌🏼 – this ground🌱🌳. The brave men, living🔥⚡️ and dead👻🕸, who struggled😩😓 here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add➕ or detract➖. The world 🌍will little👌🏻 note✉️📄, nor long remember what we say📞😮 here, but it can never forget🙇🏻 what they did here. It is for us the living☀️🐩, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work📚💻 which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced☎️📲. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task📊 remaining before us – that from these 🙌🏼honored dead⚰🙌🏼 we take increased➕💯 devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure📏📐 of devotion – that we here highly🚬🔝 resolve that these dead❗️ shall not have died 🗡☠in vain💉 – that this nation, under God⛪️🕍🎆, shall have a new birth👶🏼👏🏻 of freedom🔥🇺🇸🔔 – and that government 🏛👮🏼of the people🐓🌚, by the people💃🏽👨‍👩‍👧‍👧, for the people,⛹🏻🗽 shall not perish⚰☠ from the earth💯👌🏻🔥🙌🏼🌏.

anonymous asked:

Do you know the Declaration of Independence by heart?

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract.

The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

– Abraham Lincoln

Nov. 19, 1863

2

November 19th 1863: Gettysburg Address

On this day in 1863, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous Gettysburg Address. He made the speech at the dedication ceremony for the military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, site of the major battle between the Union and Confederacy that July. The speech is one of the most famous in American history, despite being only around two minutes long. In this brief time, Lincoln discussed the egalitarian ideals of the Declaration of Independence, praised the efforts of Union soldiers, and extolled the virtues of American democracy. The Gettysburg Address remains a seminal piece of American rhetoric, and a defining moment of Lincoln’s presidency.

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

  • Interviewer: can u freestyle for us iggy
  • Iggy:
  • Iggy: Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
  • radio guy: iggy can you free style for us
  • iggy:
  • Iggy:
  • Iggy: Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us--that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
2

With 15,000 men to Washington’s 11,000, Howe’s army was superior in both firepower and manpower when the two forces met along Brandywine Creek, at Chad’s Ford, in Pennsylvania near the Delaware border. Howe attacked on September 11, sending Cornwallis with half the troops in a deft and silent flanking maneuver—reminiscent of Long Island—to the left to cross the stream and come behind the American right wing. General Sullivan, commanding the right wing, turned almost at the last

minute to meet the assault. Cornwallis had almost broken through Sullivan, but Nathanael Greene brought two brigades from the center and raced four miles in forty-five minutes to save the American right from utter rout, and perhaps the entire army from destruction. In the meantime, Gen. Wilhelm von Knyphausen, commanding the center at Chad’s Ford, was able to crash through the American center, and Washington was forced to retreat north to Chester, where Greene brought back his brigades to join him. The American defeat had been severe indeed; Washington had lost over 1,000 casualties, while the British had lost 500. Again Howe failed to press ahead quickly and destroy the demoralized American troops, but this time there was perhaps the good excuse that the British forces were too weary.

3

Transcript Of Gettysburg Address (1863)

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln
November 19, 1863

  • Interviewer: yo iggy lay down a verse
  • Iggy: lol aight
  • Iggy: ...
  • Iggy: ...
  • Iggy: ...
  • Iggy: Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

—  Abraham Lincoln
November 19, 1863