Ada Lovelace shirts, coffee mugs, canvases, blankets, pillows and totes!

Ada Lovelace, a badass “enchantress of numbers” and all-around math nerd, wrote the world’s first computer program in the 1840s. This is my little homage to one of the many great women in STEM fields. 

Annie Easley helped make modern spaceflight possible

“Few people are brilliant enough to be a computer programmer or a mathematician. Even fewer can add "rocket scientist for NASA” to their resume. Annie Easley, however, was all three. During her 34-year career, she worked not only on technologies that led to hybrid vehicles, but also on software that enabled great strides in spaceflight and exploration. And if that wasn’t notable enough, Easley also did all of this as one of the first few African-Americans in her field.“

"37 Slogans For College Majors If They Were Actually Honest"

Accounting: selling your soul for money.

Aerospace Engineering: “it actually is rocket science.”

Anthropology: it’ll get you laid, but it won’t get you paid!

Archeology: if you don’t know what it is, it’s probably ceremonial.

Art History: and you thought making art was pointless!

Astrophysics: “Eh, I’m within an order of magnitude…”

Biochemistry: spend 4 years aspiring to discover the cure for cancer, and the rest of your life manufacturing shampoo.

Chemistry: where alcohol is a solution.

Communications: “we’ll teach you everything you need to know about convincing your friends that your degree is actually meaningful.”

Computer Engineering: tons of chicks, just not very many.

Computer Science (for a straight girl): the odds are good, but the goods are odd.

Creative Writing: because job security is for pussies.

Criminal Justice: we’re here because of Law & Order reruns.

Dental Hygienist: “something to do until you get knocked up.”

Engineering: the art of figuring out which parameters you can safely ignore.

English: so you want to be a teacher.

Film: forks on the left, knives on the right.

Finance: “accounting was too hard.”

Graphic Design: no, we’re not artists.  We’re designers; there’s a difference.

History: history may repeat itself, but you definitely will.

Information Technology: let me Google that for you.

Journalism: learn how to construct an argument that no one will listen to.

Latin: because useful is overrated.

Linguistics: studied 17 languages, fluent in none of them.

Marine Biology: “I wanted to play with dolphins, but I’m looking at algae instead.”

Music Performance: if you don’t hate yourself, you’re doing it wrong.

Nursing: learning to save others’ lives while struggling not to take your own.

Philosophy: think about it.

Photography: it’s worth a shot.

Physics: “everything you learned last week was wrong.”

Political Science: your opinion is wrong

Pre-med: “I’ll probably switch majors in two years.”

Psychology: good luck doing anything until you get your Masters.

Speech Pathology: we have a way of making you talk.

Statistics: where everything’s made up, and numbers don’t matter.

Structural Engineering: because architects don’t know what physics is.

Zoology: because you can’t major in kittens.

“President Ronald Reagan greets CAPT. Grace Hopper as she arrives at the White House for her promotion to commodore, 12/15/1983”

Did you notice today’s Google Doodle dedicated to computing pioneer and U.S.Navy Rear Admiral Grace Hopper’s 107th birthday ?  Our colleagues at the National Archives at Kansas City found this photo of then-Captain Hopper during her promotion to Commodore 30 years ago in December 1983. 

(There are dozens more photos of Rear Admiral Hopper in our online catalog.)


Yo check out what I got today! It’s a book from the early 90s that attempts to list every person online with their email address, in the manner of a phone book. This was to be the first in series, but they never released a “1995″ edition much less a later one. Not sure if the free update mailings ever happened either.

Take a close look at the listing pages - you’ll see that they listed people with obviously fake names like “Im Not Iron MAN” as if Man was the last name.

This is close to peak web 1.0.

AP Exam Tips


  • Take a ton of practice tests to see what you remember and see what you got wrong
  • Study what you got wrong (look at your notes, crash course videos, online study guides, etc.) (I’m too tired right now to link study materials for you all, sorry, but you can find them, they’re not that hard)
  • Take more practice tests to see if you finally absorbed that information
  • ****take different practice tests just so you don’t get the right answer because the question looked familiar, that helps no one and it just tests how well you remember that specific question, NOT the information
  • If you still got things wrong, study them
  • Take more practice tests
  • Once you’re thinking “oh yeah, I have a good grasp of this,” then go back at some of the questions that you did get right and see if you got them right by chance (like you just randomly picked the right answer and hoped that it was the right one, because chances are, you might not get lucky again on the actual exam)
  • Ways to test to see if you have a good grasp on information:
  • ****try and explain the information to someone (a friend who’s willing (for some reason), a pet, a stuffed animal, etc.) 
    ****weird method I use is a connection map: write down 2 terms, events, etc., then from one of those terms, write down things you can connect to it, explain the connections, and eventually tie it to the second term you put down. This works for exams like history and psych especially. An example (from AP Psych because that’s what I have to study) in which I connect groupthink to PTSD:
  • Groupthink is when we have a tendency to seek concurrence among group members, or form similar attitudes and beliefs based on the whole group. This often leads to people wanting to conform more to the group’s expectations (or what they think those expectations are) so that they are a part of the “in-group.” People often recognize social distance when they are part of an in-group and can distinguish themselves from an out-group, which leads to a whole lotta prejudice, or negative attitude(s) toward and individual based solely on one’s membership in a particular group. Prejudice often leads to violence against another group. Such violence is a major stressor on individuals who are being attacked. If the even is traumatic enough, a person may never really get over the event. A person could develop PTSD, a delayed stress reaction in which an individual involuntarily re-experiences emotional, cognitive, and behavioral aspects of past trauma in the form of flashbacks (common traumas that lead to this include: death, injury, natural disaster, rape, etc.).
  • Practice FRQs because those are more recall than recognition and will help your memory get used to recalling things (just bullet ideas, though, don’t waste your time with paragraphs because:
  •  a) some scorers really don’t care if your paragraphs are the epitome of good writing (e.g. AP Psych), 
  • b) some of them don’t even involve writing (e.g. AP Calculus), 
  • c) content is more important than fluff, and you can worry about your writing style later ) 
  • Study things you still don’t get
  • Take more practice tests
  • Repeat until you make practice tests your master (and eventually FRQs)
  • If you have to speak during your exam, practice speaking. Just get used to it and fine-tune your pronunciation (mainly advice for foreign languages)


  • If you are overextending yourself, stop studying and take a break, you don’t deserve to be so stressed.
  • Remember to eat, drink, etc.
  • Go to bed at a good time 
  • ****use this here thing to calculate when to go to bed based on when you’re supposed to wake up


  • On the morning of the test do whatever you can to make you feel better, even if it means:
  • ****wearing a lucky shirt or any other superstition that might help you
  • ****reminding yourself that this is just a test and that college board is evil
  • ****just saying good things about yourself like “damn I am the best-looking test-taker in this entire room!” or about the situation “hey I get to get out of class to do this!”
  • Because if you feel like you’re gonna do well, you’ll do better than if you think that you’re going to fail. 
  • Read every question because ap tests like to mess with you and give you confusingly worded questions. Do not be fooled, you are better than that.

AND AFTER THE TEST (if you can):

  • Celebrate with a milkshake or whatever (I did that for my AP Euro exam two years ago and it was probably the best decision ever, but you do whatever makes you happy)
  • Take a nap, naps are great (especially if you’re the type of person that gets REALLY tense during the actual exam and gets really tired afterwards no matter how challenging the test was)
  • Just do at least one nice thing for yourself if you can, even if it’s something small like looking at a cat video on youtube


  • Study, try not to overextend yourself as usual, and head to bed earlier
  • ****or calculate when you should go to bed again 
  • Use the same or similar methods depending on the importance and/or ease of the exam (like if one subject is really kicking your ass, study for that one over the one you’re pretty okay with)

Good luck!


The Antic Cyber Graphics Software

Old website which takes a look at 3D software before the time of Autodesk and 3DS Max, especially for the 16-bit Atari ST computer:

This Web site documents some moderately obscure computer graphics software history: a suite of animation products produced in the late 1980’s for the Atari ST personal computer platform. Although the fact is not widely known, this Atari software, published by a defunct computer magazine called Antic, directly preceded and led to the Autodesk 3D Studio and Discreet 3ds max products used by thousands of people today.

More Here