computer-generated

5

Amazing Digital Art

Born in Poland in 1972, digital artist Adam Martinakis currently lives and works in in Cannock, United Kingdom. His computer-generated artworks employ aspects of photorealism and surrealism to explore the human condition which he says results in a “mixture of post-fantasy futurism and abstract symbolism”.

a poem

Gravity doesn’t grant me “knock knock knock” the darkness.
.
Stay tame, soft river, the plague.
Only in sorrow, so lucid as i am seeking sanctuary in.
Ascend the bittersweet desire of this chess game of a storm of oil stain, stained the most fallen on the lightening finally tears from you have ourselves immune to look rather than respected.
There’s nothing.
The struggle is thrown wide, wide open arms need.
Perfectly imperfect, like a little poem.
While guilty eyes from portraits.
Four letter invitation.

2

Bursting Bubbles

Two UC Berkeley researchers have now described mathematically the successive stages in the complex evolution and disappearance of foamy bubbles (the images above are based off of a computer-generated video that uses their equations).

What purpose does this serve (besides making for some very mesmerizing GIFS…)?  The work has applications in industrial processes for making metal and plastic foams (like those used to cushion bicycle helmets) and in modeling growing cell clusters, which rely on these types of equations.

The problem with describing foams mathematically has been that the evolution of a bubble cluster a few inches across depends on what’s happening in the extremely thin walls of each bubble, which are thinner than a human hair.

Read the full story

4

Matter by Quayola

Quayola on his project:

Matter is a time-based digital sculpture; a celebration of matter itself, the substance of all physical things. It describes a continuous dynamic articulation of a solid, pure block of matter, from the simplest primitive forms to the highest details of geometric complexities, and vice versa… from the unpredictable grace of geological processes to the perfection, beauty and precision of man made crafts. The subject of this piece is Rodin’s sculpture Le Penseur (The Thinker), a masterpiece born as the avant-garde that has since become a universal classical icon, and now considered the bridge from classical to modern sculpture.

See the dynamic piece in this video:

Matter - (excerpt) from Quayola on Vimeo.

7

Some of the many configurations of Infinite Sunset by Joseph Gray

About the project:

Created after visiting Kauai and staring West into the Pacific quite a bit during sundown […] It intentionally uses simple graphical elements to visually describe a sunset seascape ever changing in its sameness. The piece is meant to be viewed with various devices/contexts and is therefore a “responsive” composition. Aesthetically the piece pursues the reductionist purity of certain mid-century modernist perspectives but using the contemporary, generative, medium of code.