As of 2016, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011) is the most expensive movie ever made.

Costing $378.5 million to make, it stars A-list actors Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz as Captain Jack Sparrow and Angelica in search of the Fountain of Youth.  

It utilized similar 3-D film technology that was used for Avatar, and featured around 1,200 computer generated sequences. The investment appears to be worthwhile, since this forth ‘Pirates’ movie made $1.046 billion dollars at the box office.


Bursting Bubbles

Two UC Berkeley researchers have now described mathematically the successive stages in the complex evolution and disappearance of foamy bubbles (the images above are based off of a computer-generated video that uses their equations).

What purpose does this serve (besides making for some very mesmerizing GIFS…)?  The work has applications in industrial processes for making metal and plastic foams (like those used to cushion bicycle helmets) and in modeling growing cell clusters, which rely on these types of equations.

The problem with describing foams mathematically has been that the evolution of a bubble cluster a few inches across depends on what’s happening in the extremely thin walls of each bubble, which are thinner than a human hair.

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a poem

And i know i found but we crafted, a dying wave on the very last.
Out from the mist that pleasure’s got is built of heartwork.
Ignorance is the polar of your weight bearing back breaking, alter the crowd the experiences we’ve died within yet below the sweetest fracture from which we speak loses urgency.
Even if all rise and this love affair all love to you appear.
Flowers only for the flood swell and the nervous light, i look into life from dust that is a painted catcalls as concrete.
But the mast of violence, beasts of its humble breath.
Hiding below the nervous light town when you sought your vehicle the dark.
Out from myself in that feather i am forgetting how it clear the struggle.
Laced with ghosts feats, from side to leave me to die, and it seems.
Just formal ritual.


New Galactic Supercluster Map Shows Milky Way’s ‘Heavenly’ Home

A new cosmic map is giving scientists an unprecedented look at the boundaries for the giant supercluster that is home to Earth’s own Milky Way galaxy and many others. Scientists even have a name for the colossal galactic group: Laniakea, Hawaiian for “immeasurable heaven.”

Image 1: Scientists have created the first map of a colossal supercluster of galaxies known as Laniakea, the home of Earth’s Milky Way galaxy and many other. This computer simulation, a still from a Nature journal video, depicts the giant supercluster, with the Milky Way’s location shown as a red dot. Credit: [Nature Video](

Image 2: This computer-generated depiction of the Laniakea Supercluster of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way galaxy containing Earth’s solar system, shows a view of the supercluster as seen from the supergalactic equatorial plane. Credit: SDvision interactive visualization software by DP at CEA/Saclay, France

The scientists responsible for the new 3D map suggest that the newfound Laniakea supercluster of galaxies may even be part of a still-larger structure they have not fully defined yet.

“We live in something called 'the cosmic web,’ where galaxies are connected in tendrils separated by giant voids,” said lead study author Brent Tully, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii at Honolulu.

Galactic structures in space

Galaxies are not spread randomly throughout the universe. Instead, they clump in groups, such as the one Earth is in, the Local Group, which contains dozens of galaxies. In turn, these groups are part of massive clusters made up of hundreds of galaxies, all interconnected in a web of filaments in which galaxies are strung like pearls. The colossal structures known as superclusters form at the intersections of filaments.

The giant structures making up the universe often have unclear boundaries. To better define these structures, astronomers examined Cosmicflows-2, the largest-ever catalog of the motions of galaxies, reasoning that each galaxy belongs to the structure whose gravity is making it flow toward.

“We have a new way of defining large-scale structures from the velocities of galaxies rather than just looking at their distribution in the sky,” Tully said.


Some of the many configurations of Infinite Sunset by Joseph Gray

About the project:

Created after visiting Kauai and staring West into the Pacific quite a bit during sundown […] It intentionally uses simple graphical elements to visually describe a sunset seascape ever changing in its sameness. The piece is meant to be viewed with various devices/contexts and is therefore a “responsive” composition. Aesthetically the piece pursues the reductionist purity of certain mid-century modernist perspectives but using the contemporary, generative, medium of code.