complex 13

The first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket lands at Landing Zone 1 (former Launch Complex 13) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, 8:38 pm EST, December 21, 2015.

Nine minutes earlier, at 8:29 pm, the Falcon 9 lifted off from SLC-40 with 11 Orbcomm OG2 satellites. This was the first time in history an orbital rocket landed successfully and recovered following launch.

Full video of the landing from a SpaceX Hexacopter drone can be seen here.

The cosmic cloud of gas and dust is W33, a massive starforming complex some 13,000 light-years distant, near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. So what are all those yellow balls? Citizen scientists of the web-based Milky Way Project found the features they called yellow balls as they scanned many Spitzer images and persistently asked that question of researchers. Now there is an answer. The yellow balls in Spitzer images are identified as an early stage of massive star formation. They appear yellow because they are overlapping regions of red and green, the assigned colors that correspond to dust and organic molecules known as PAHs at Spitzer wavelengths. Yellow balls represent the stage before newborn massive stars clear out cavities in their surrounding gas and dust and appear as green-rimmed bubbles with red centers in the Spitzer image. Of course, the astronomical crowdsourcing success story is only part of the Zooniverse. The Spitzer image spans 0.5 degrees or about 100 light-years at the estimated distance of W33.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Yellow Balls in W33 : Infrared wavelengths of 3.6, 8.0, and 24.0 microns observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope are mapped into visible colors red, green, and blue in this striking image. The cosmic cloud of gas and dust is W33, a massive starforming complex some 13,000 light-years distant, near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. So what are all those yellow balls? Citizen scientists of the web-based Milky Way Project found the features they called yellow balls as they scanned many Spitzer images and persistently asked that question of researchers. Now there is an answer. The yellow balls in Spitzer images are identified as an early stage of massive star formation. They appear yellow because they are overlapping regions of red and green, the assigned colors that correspond to dust and organic molecules known as PAHs at Spitzer wavelengths. Yellow balls represent the stage before newborn massive stars clear out cavities in their surrounding gas and dust and appear as green-rimmed bubbles with red centers in the Spitzer image. Of course, the astronomical crowdsourcing success story is only part of the Zooniverse. The Spitzer image spans 0.5 degrees or about 100 light-years at the estimated distance of W33. via NASA

15 Mind-Blowing Facts That You Should Read (Part 165)

1. “Jurassic World” had a U.S. debut of $208.8 million and a $315.6 million overseas debut, breaking the records of “The Avengers” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows- Part 2” for the biggest opening in movie history.

2. Raccoons are pretty smart: they can unlock 11 of 13 complex locks in under 10 tries, and can repeat the process even when the locks are rearranged or turned upside down. Research also says that they can remember solutions to problems for up to 3 years.

3. In 1777, Sybil Ludington rode 40 miles (more than twice the distance covered by Paul Revere) on horseback to warn American colonial forces of the approaching British, riding from around 9 p.m. till dawn the next day. She was only 16 at the time.

4. Red wavelengths of light do not exist 30 feet underwater; blood, therefore, appears green.

5. Popeye is based on a real person named…

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Complexes- Chapter 13

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No matter how much pain was coursing through my legs, I didn’t stop running, not for even a second. My body was bathed in sweat and had been for the past hour that I was running on the treadmill. The gym had practically been my home for the past couple of days. I barely left, but why would I need to? I had to get my head back in the game somehow and working myself harder and harder each day was how I was going to do it.

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