companion galaxy

Archive: Flipping OVer the Cartwheel Galaxy (Archive: NASA, Chandra, 01/11/06) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
(From 2006) This image combines data from four different observatories: the Chandra X-ray Observatory (purple); the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite (ultraviolet/blue); the Hubble Space Telescope (visible/green); the Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared/red). The unusual shape of the Cartwheel Galaxy is likely due to a collision with one of the smaller galaxies on the lower left several hundred million years ago.

The smaller galaxy produced compression waves in the gas of the Cartwheel as it plunged through it. These compression waves trigger bursts of star formation. The most recent star burst has lit up the Cartwheel’s rim, which has a diameter larger than that of the Milky Way galaxy, with millions of bright young stars.

When the most massive of these stars explode as supernovas, they leave behind neutron stars and black holes. Some of these neutron stars and black holes have nearby companion stars, and have become powerful sources of X-rays as they pull matter off their companions.

The brightest X-ray sources are likely black holes with companion stars, and appear as the white dots that lie along the rim of the X-ray image. The Cartwheel contains an exceptionally large number of these black hole binary X-ray sources, because many massive stars formed in the rim.

Original caption/more images: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2006/cartwheel/

Image credit: Composite: NASA/JPL/Caltech/P.Appleton et al. X-ray: NASA/CXC/A.Wolter & G.Trinchieri et al.

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Jackson Galaxy Challenges Cat Haters, Dispels Popular Stereotypes and Explains How to Bond with Your Kitty

“Often, animal guardians become frustrated with their misbehaving companions and ultimately end up dropping them at a shelter, pawning them off on a friend, or just straight-up abandoning them. Galaxy helps families bond with cats so the home can be a happy place. He essentially wants to work himself straight out of a job by showing as many people as he can that anyone can understand cats if they put the time and effort in.

Considering most of us in the JustLuxe office are fanatics for our companions, we were pretty excited when the opportunity to chat with Jackson came along. As much as we wanted to pick his brain regarding each of our kitty concerns (one with his overly emotional meowing and another with the tendency to pull his own fur out), it’s difficult for a behaviorist to give advice on a specific kitty without actually meeting the feline. So instead, Jackson challenged self-professed cat haters, chatted about keeping our egos in check, and dispelled the silly myth that cats misbehave out of revenge.”

Read the interview here

Messier 32 - Companion Galaxy to Andromeda

After yesterdays featured post on M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, I now have M32, which is a much smaller galaxy in close proximity to its host. Discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1749 and catalogued by Charles Messier in 1764. It was the first elliptical galaxy ever observed, more specifically a compact elliptical. It is thought that these kind of galaxies, opposed to the beautiful spirals, are large clumps of organised old stars, giving the galaxy a very orange colour. If you can find the giant of Andromeda, M32 is very close by!

Top: Wide-Field - Adam Evans

Bottom: Close-Up - John Lanoue

A lopsided lynx

This galaxy, known as NGC 2337, resides 25 million light-years away in the constellation of Lynx. NGC 2337 is an irregular galaxy, meaning that it — along with a quarter of all galaxies in the Universe — lacks a distinct, regular appearance. The galaxy  was discovered in 1877 by the French astronomer Édouard Stephan who, in the same year, discovered the galactic group Stephan’s Quintet.

Although irregular galaxies may never win a beauty prize when competing with their more symmetrical spiral and elliptical peers, astronomers consider them to be very important. Some irregular galaxies may have once fallen into one of the regular classes of the Hubble sequence, but were warped and deformed by a passing cosmic companion. As such, irregular galaxies provide astronomers with a valuable opportunity to learn more about galactic evolution and interaction.

Despite the disruption, gravitational interactions between galaxies can kickstart star formation activity within the affected galaxies, which may explain the pockets of blue light scattered throughout NGC 2337. These patches and knots of blue signal the presence of young, newly formed, hot stars.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; August 31, 2013:

NGC 5195: The Dot Under the Question Mark 
Hubble Legacy ArchiveNASAESA - ProcessingJosé Jiménez Priego

Dwarf galaxy NGC 5195 is best known as the smaller companion of spiral M51, the Whirlpool galaxy. Seen together they seem to trace the curve and dot of a cosmic question mark, recorded in Lord Rosse’s 19th century drawings as one of the original spiral nebulae. Dwarfed by enormous M51 (aka NGC 5194), NGC 5195 spans about 20,000 light-years. A close encounter with M51 has likely triggered star formation and enhanced that galaxy’s prominent spiral arms. Processed from image data available in the Hubble Legacy Archive, this majestic close-up of NGC 5195 makes it clear that the dwarf galaxy now lies behind M51. A tidal bridge of dark dust clouds and young blue star clusters stretches from the outskirts of M51 on the right, appearing in silhouette against the dwarf galaxy’s yellowish glow. The famous pair of interacting galaxies lie some 30 million light-years away, toward the handle of the Big Dipper, and the constellation of the Hunting Dogs.

TO BE DESTROYED http://nyccats.urgentpodr.org/space-a1088861/

SPACE - A1088861

*** TO BE DESTROYED 09/13/16 *** “SPACE,” THE FINAL FRONTIER……We don’t know if SPACE is a Trekkie, but we do know he would like to get beamed out of the ACC!!….Only 4 months old, SPACE is curious about the strange planet called the NYC ACC, but he is wary of the inhabitants…..and rightly so….Given time and patience, SPACE will become a companion to travel the galaxy with if the NYC ACC doesn’t annihilate him first….GET TO THE TRANSPORTER ROOM NOW & SET COORDINATES TO FOSTER OR ADOPT!! HOPING SPACE EXPERIENCES “PEACE & LONG LIFE”… Please Share:

From SpaceTelescope.Org Picture of the Week; August 8, 2016:

A Lopsided Lynx

This galaxy, known as NGC 2337, resides 25 million light-years away in the constellation of Lynx. NGC 2337 is an irregular galaxy, meaning that it — along with a quarter of all galaxies in the Universe — lacks a distinct, regular appearance. The galaxy was discovered in 1877 by the French astronomer Édouard Stephan who, in the same year, discovered the galactic group Stephan’s Quintet (heic0910i).

Although irregular galaxies may never win a beauty prize when competing with their more symmetrical spiral and elliptical peers, astronomers consider them to be very important. Some irregular galaxies may have once fallen into one of the regular classes of the Hubble sequence, but were warped and deformed by a passing cosmic companion. As such, irregular galaxies provide astronomers with a valuable opportunity to learn more about galactic evolution and interaction.

Despite the disruption, gravitational interactions between galaxies can kickstart star formation activity within the affected galaxies, which may explain the pockets of blue light scattered throughout NGC 2337. These patches and knots of blue signal the presence of young, newly formed, hot stars.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA