communism in romania

2

Yes, Romania is beautiful, but we can’t post images of our great castles or our breathtaking nature at this moment. Everything is in danger right now. The government of the PSD (the neo-communists) made corruption legal. It’s true, it’s great, would Trump say. But we’ve had our share of corruption. We’re done. We want transparency. We want to be a modern country. But now, those politicians want to legalize corruption and of course they are the ones who won’t end up in jail because of this new law. They steal our money and our lives. 

We, the people, can’t do anything about it, except this: protest and share our message with the world. We only want to live in this beautiful country with breathtaking nature and great cultural places, but without those corrupt and arrogant politicians. 

Please help us, and share. And Romanians: protest!

after the law that the romanian government passed 3 days ago (which as i said in my last post, would effectively make corruption legal (if under 45k euros, good joke) and would pardon everyone who previously got arrested for it) , thousands upon thousands of people went out in the streets to protest, making this the largest protest romania’s had since the 1989 revolution

it hasnt even been 30 years, i really hope we can stop it here and now

2

It was 1989.

It was late December and the previous night I came back from a ski trip with friends. Up in the mountains, no radio, no mobile phones, no nothing, this was communist Romania so we only found out in the train back that our world started to move. That Romanians had enough of that so called “communist dream” and started to fill up the streets, marching and demanding to overthrow that monument of corruption called the Romanian Communist Party, starting with its dreaded leader Ceausescu…

After a few hours of worried sleep I woke up in the late morning in the sound of chants coming form the main street. My mother was looking stunned out the window. “Look at them, they are coming from the Bargaie. They must have gathered at the factories there to march into town. They must be crazy, poor blokes… Securitatea are shooting at people on the streets you know? And the army… There are already victims everywhere, in Cluj, in Timisoara…” I looked out the window and felt like hardening every second “…and what are we doing now, mom?” “We? We… just wait here…” “But we cannot wait, mom! We cannot wait here… we must go and see what’s going on! Waiting here is, is, is just wrong!” said defiantly the teenager I was at the time. My mother started to weep “But, but your father? He’s out to get the daily bread ratio, he will be worried as hell seeing we’re missing?” “He will know where we are. Let’s go.” And off we went, scared but with no regrets, because we had to go. We met dad in the main square by sheer chance later, chanting with the others, and the rest is already known.

27 years later, the followers of that communist party had time to slowly morph into a proper mafia. They abandoned any illusion of ideology and thus, freed by the burden of maintaining principles, finally managed to attain full political control of the country. This week they started to modify the laws to fit their corrupt ways, to pardon their already jailed mafiosi, to make abuse and malpractice legal and to restrict whistleblowing. I’m thousands of kilometers away from that country now, but I know I must get out on the streets again - with the same deep hatred but more prowess. We are hundreds of thousands on the streets, again.

And I’m going now with my kid.

(not my photos, I still have to find the authors)
All Bets Are Off

((OOC: Dealing out some authentic 90′s wizarding world realness, Brit played by: @mightbeamalfoy, Charlie played by: @girlswillbeboys11, Keenan played by: @kapitan5o))


*Charlie, Lexa, Brit are sat at a table playing poker*

Brit: *gathers the chips in front of her*

Brit: Y'know, Charlie, I heard your little brothers had quite a knack for gambling, it’s a shame you never picked up any of their tricks– 

Lexa: oh maybe that’s your brothers giving you some advice now 

Brit: beg your pardon? 

Brit: *realizing* Hagrid?

FIN

ROMANIA. Bucharest. December 22, 1989. Bucharest’s residents protect themselves from the crossfire between an army tank and pro-Ceausescu troops during clashes in the Republican square.

On December 22, 1989, my mind was still full of memories of covering the fall of the Berlin Wall. I was ready to celebrate Christmas with my family, but the Romanian communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu changed my plans.

My boss and I were watching Ceausescu leave Bucharest by helicopter live on TV. I rushed to the airport and was lucky to board a flight chartered by the Medecins du Monde humanitarian organisation.

We landed at in Bulgaria and took a taxi to the Romanian border. Luckily the border was not closed and I hitch-hiked a ride to the capital on a truck. At noon I simply took the metro to arrive in downtown Bucharest in the middle of heavy gunfire. No helmet, no bullet proof jacket, only the enthusiasm of youth and the joy of witnessing a historical event: a revolution.

With my 300 mm 2.8 and an extender, I shot residents protecting themselves in the crossfire between an army tank and pro-Ceausescu troops during clashes in Republican square. No time for more pictures, just enough time to process and send a lone colour print to reach Sunday newspaper deadlines.

There were only two phone lines at the hotel, and scores of reporters arriving to file their stories. I kept the phone line open and did not hang up for 10 days in order to transmit pictures and stories.

The picture made the front page of most international papers. It was not the best picture of the revolution but one of the first colour pictures to hit the media market. It reminds me how hard it was to get around with cases of heavy equipment (80 kg of gear including an enlarger, photo paper, a transmitter, a typewriter).

Photograph: Charles Platiau/Reuters

ROMANIAN VOCABULARY

Considering what was happening in Romania (well..happens, because people are still protesting) I thought I will do a vocabulary post with words I’ve heard multiple times on the TV or on the Internet about this recently.

  • corruption - corupție
  • protest - protest (!) the pronunciation is different
  • protesters - protestatari
  • Government - Guvern
  • police - poliție
  • policeman - polițist
  • amnesty - amnistie
  • pardon - grațiere
  • Justice Minister- Ministrul Justiției
  • communism - comunism 
  • resignation - demisie
  • Parliament - Parlament
  • power - putere
  • fraud - fraudă
  • crowd - mulțime
  • law - lege
  • citizens - cetățeni
  • Bucharest - București
  • president - președinte
  • street - stradă
  • to vote - a vota 
  • confidence - încredere 
  • coalition - coaliție 
  • legislation - legislație
  • rally - adunare 
  • abuse - abuz 
  • attempt - încercare 
  • country - țară
  • elections - alegeri 
  • decree - decret
  • controversial - controversat 
  • bill - proiect de lege
  • Victory Square - Piața Victoriei
  • movement - mișcare
  • Prime minister - Prim-ministru
  • abuse of power - abuz de putere 
  • to surrender - a se preda
  • judiciary - judiciar
  • pressure - presiune 
  • fall of communism - căderea comunismului 
  • Constitutional Court - Curtea Constituțională
  • Constituion - Constituție 
  • to accuse - a acuza
  • public debate - dezbatere publică
  • decision - decizie 
  • to approve - a aproba
  • conference - conferință
  • official statement - declarație oficială
  • democracy - democrație
  • politics - politică
  • integrity - integritate
  • prison - închisoare
  • lie - minciună
  • flag - steag
  • anthem - imn
  • manipulation - manipulare
  • enemy - dușman 
  • heart - inimă 
  • love - iubire 
  • I care - îmi pasă
  • I do not give up - Eu nu renunț
  • Ne-am săturat - We’ve had enough
  • resist - rezist
  • Capitalist pig: Hey, where you get that COMMUNISM from
  • Capitalist pig: where you get that COMMUNISM from
  • Eastern block: I got it from my MOTHER RUSSIA *dabs*
  • USA: *angery sends more soldiers to Vietnam* *makes more nukes*

ROMANIA. Bucharest. 1989. In an example of acute historical irony, this anticommunist civilian uses an AK-47 to hunt down secret police during the overthrow of Nicolae Ceausescu, Romania’s oppressive communist dictator.

The Romanian Revolution was a period of violent civil unrest in December 1989 and part of the Revolutions of 1989 that occurred in several countries. The Romanian Revolution started in the city of Timișoara and soon spread throughout the country, ultimately culminating in the show trial and execution of longtime Communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, and the end of 42 years of Communist rule in Romania. It was also the last removal of a Communist regime in a Warsaw Pact country during the events of 1989, and the only one that violently overthrew a country’s government and executed its leader.

Photograph: Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty

ROMANIA. Bucharest. 1989. Demonstrators and TAB-71 APCs on the street. Part of the photobook 1989 Libertate Roumanie by Denoel Paris and other photographers.

The Romanian Revolution was a period of violent civil unrest in December 1989 and part of the Revolutions of 1989 that occurred in several countries. The Romanian Revolution started in the city of Timișoara and soon spread throughout the country, ultimately culminating in the show trial and execution of longtime Communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, and the end of 42 years of Communist rule in Romania. It was also the last removal of a Communist regime in a Warsaw Pact country during the events of 1989, and the only one that violently overthrew a country’s government and executed its leader.

Photograph: Denoel Paris

  • Romania: Guys! Guys, let's take a vote.
  • Greece: Secret vote. Everybody cover your eyes.
  • [They all cover their eyes.]
  • Bulgaria: We won't know the results.
  • Serbia: Well, say your vote out loud.
  • Herzegovina: We'll know each other's voices.
  • Bosnia: Montenegro's got a point.