commodore mendez

Spirk in Episode 12

In this episode, Spock directly disobeys orders to visit Captain Pike and bring him to a forbidden planet. 

NGL, this (and the second part) was my least favorite episodes, since it was just a retelling of the pilot, but hot damn it has so many Spirk moments.

Kirk will believe Spock over a commanding officer telling him that something is impossible. There was no hesitation at all.

When the records show that your boyfriend first officer was either lying or had been framed, choose the option that protects your boyfriend. 

After Spock commandeered the Enterprise to bring Captain Pike to Talos IV, Kirk and Commodore Mendez take a shuttlecraft to stop him/find out wtf is going on.

That moment of sadness.

HE IS SO READY TO TURN THIS DAMN CAR AROUND.

And the hurt in his face when he decides not to just kills me.

After dropping Pike off at Talos IV, Spock picks up the shuttle and brings it back to the starbase. As a result, he goes on trial.

I mean there was that one time in my first deep space mission that I delayed in firing on that cloud thing and everyone except me was destroyed. But nah, this is more devastating.

Normally, when Spock outwits someone, he has that little self-satisfied smirk on his face, but he knows what this is doing to Kirk and he doesn’t want to force Kirk to watch this happen but it needs to happen and he’s just so sad.

Spock gets threatened with the death penalty, amount of fucks given: None.

Kirk gets threatened with something. Amount of fucks given:

OVER 9,000!

HE SAID PLEASE AND CALLED KIRK “JIM” INSTEAD OF “CAPTAIN” HOT DAMN I PRAY FOR THE SWEET EMBRACE OF DEATH.

4

Gene Roddenberry had pushed for DeForest Kelley to play the ship’s doctor as far back as “The Cage,” but the pilot’s director Robert Butler felt that the actor’s previous roles meant that the audience would perceive him as a “heavy.” Butler chose John Hoyt to play the role of Dr. Phillip Boyce.

When it came time to shoot the second pilot, Roddenberry repeated his preference for Kelley but, again, was talked out of that choice by director James Goldstone.

The man who ended up playing ship’s doctor Mark Piper in “Where No Man Has Gone Before” was Paul Fix. The 64 year old actor had close to 300 credits in film and television (including the recurring role of Sheriff Micah Torrance on Rifleman and the judge in To Kill A Mockingbird) and was so frequently billed as the third man in any given cast that he wrote about the experience in a book.

(Interestingly, Fix’s Third Man Through The Door actually influenced Malachi Thorne, who would later play Commodore Mendez in “The Menagerie” to turn down the role of Boyce in “The Cage.”)