commas&industry

4

The transport ramp

When we reached this place it was bitter cold and it had just begun to snow. We fought through the forest and were thrilled by this sight. It has been over 100 years since this transport ramp was built for a mine. Probably thousands of tons of rock were extracted from the mountain. 

Today there is nothing left of the mine. Only this monumental building can no longer be reconstructed and therefore remains alone and deserted in the forest.

6

What a shit show. SO much wrong here

Please note how the main role of the one black woman Pepsi focuses on is to play servant to Kendall while she goes off to “end racism” (or something) by making sure that the police are well hydrated before they don riot gear and go off to the #BLM protests to terrorize all the black activists Pepsi didn’t want represented in their “social justice” ad

And yeah, the BLM activists and Standing Rock protectors who been out there getting pepper sprayed, arrested and worse, got a nebulous non-apology from Pepsi, but Kendall—who has NEVER protested for anything and who has certainly already cashed a very fat paycheck from Pepsi—got the real sincere apology

I think the thing with the movie is it’s so intimate within the characters that I think if you’re not a history buff you’re still going to love it. It doesn’t feel like a war movie. It feels like a very intense, suspenseful survival story. It’s a really important piece of history that is often overlooked, and I think it’s cool that he’s [Nolan] gonna be telling that story. So I’m excited to see it, and I hope people like it.
—  Harry talking about Dunkirk

So I just saw [this post] on my dash and wanted to add on but the post was already super long so. Here are some things I’ve learned from about a decade of martial arts (both practicing, competing, and teaching) that might be useful for writers:

  • If your character practices martial arts at a school, know that every school will teach that particular style a little differently. 
  • If your character doesn’t have flexibility/doesn’t stretch. they. will. hurt. themself. trying. to. kick. Even if it’s just waist-high. People who aren’t used to fighting will pull something.
  • People who have been training for a long time will have stronger hands/feet. 
  • Grappling is dirty work. You’re on the ground, you’re grabbing what you can, it’s not as hot as you might think it is.  
  • Holds/grappling/etc. are ingrained reactions. If someone grabs your wrist, reacting immediately is something that is a trained reaction. Same with throwing someone over your shoulder. The steps are practiced again and again and again until they’re gut reactions. 
  • Building off that: even if you’ve trained with a million of these drills, real life is always a little different. You have to be ready to improvise.
  • For the love of all that is holy, karate is not a universal name for martial arts. There are usually modern/sport and traditional versions of martial arts. In my experience, bits and pieces from others will mix together. (for example, I learned a lot of aikido and judo learning self-defense in taekwondo)
  • The effectiveness of the way your character fights can depend a lot on where and how they learned how to fight.
  • This may not be important for writing fight scenes in general, but just as a side note: martial arts have philosophies. If your character is trained in a particular MA, make sure to do research on that philosophy. It might be important to your characterization. 
  • Getting hit hurts. Unless you’ve been fighting for a while and are used to getting hit, you’re gonna be shocked. 
  • The most strategic person is going to lose at least 80% of their thought-process when fighting. The RDJ Sherlock Holmes fight scenes? Where he thinks everything out? Nah man. A lot of fighting is muscle memory & practiced combos.