commas commas commas

What I dreamed about last

I deliberately did not answer this in the anon ask, because it’s funny as fuck.

Ambien makes me forget things (most of you probably know this).

I have vivid, vivid dreams, and I’ve always made a point to write them down. 

Since I’ve been taking the ambien, I will often wake up with a new note in my phone, and no idea why I wrote it, or what it’s referring to.

Two days ago, this is what I found.

Keep reading

Monday 8:27am
I woke up with you on my mind.
You called me babe last night —
my heart is still pounding.

Tuesday 10:53pm
Today I realized we won’t work.
What we are is hurting her.
And I think she matters more to me than you do.

Wednesday 11:52pm
I broke things off with you today.
She barely said a word.
I’ve never regretted anything more than this.

Thursday 4:03pm
I shouldn’t have sent that message.
You shouldn’t have been so okay with receiving it.

Friday 9:57pm
I almost messaged you today.
I didn’t.

Saturday 8:49pm
I’m walking around town in search of alcohol.
They say that liquor numbs the pain of having a broken heart.
I want to put that to the test.

Sunday 2:32am
I heard you texted a girl you’ve never spoken to before.
I wonder if it’s because you’re trying to replace me.
I can’t help but wish you weren’t.
I thought I was irreplaceable.

—  a week with you on my mind, c.j.n.

Now, as adherents of the great and terrible AP Stylebook — which also eschews the Oxford comma — we must admit the moral of this story flies in the face of everything (or one thing) NPR’s own sentences stand for.

But we offer these stories as a reminder that every punctuation mark deserves a fair hearing, a glimpse into the glories of grammar(,) and a quiet rebellion against the tyranny of copy editors everywhere.*

*Just a joke, NPR copy desk! Please don’t break out the red pen.

The Oxford Comma: Great For Listing, Pontificating, And Winning Court Cases

Image by Chelsea Beck/NPR

I just wanted to let a few of you know that if you any of you who are writers of fiction or poetry (or even if you have a gnawing hunger to read more!) you should try Commaful to post your stuff. It’s this really pleasant community of writers who support and actually give back feedback on any work you post. I’ve been there for almost 7 months now and of all my poetry posts, I’ve never gotten one negative comment. I’ve never seen a negative comment on the site period. Each post is like this little slideshow of a book and they’re so easy to make and coming from a really bad place last year mentally with a lingering depression and years of not feeling good about my poetry, I’ve never felt more accepted or inspired until I joined. I hope any who reads or writes like I do checks it out. Commaful.com is so much better for you and your work than Tumblr is.

Also, follow me if you like it and I’ll follow back! I’m wethedreamers there. Come be sad with me and look at my poetry and I’ll look at yours. :)