comic book related art

pull yourself together district leader

3

I don’t think I’ve ever been more grateful for someone’s love and support than I am now.

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Miss Fisher Random Thoughts (266)

When we talk about bookshops in today’s world, it’s a place we purchase books. However, Miss Lee’s bookshop in S1E5 Raisins and Almonds has a “lending index”, which is used to record the book’s lending history. It’s unclear whether she actually sells books too, but it’s obvious that her bookshop functions as a library or book rental shop.

It reminds me of the “租書店” I used to frequent when I was growing up in Taiwan. This is how Wikipedia describes it, “In Taiwan, it is a store that buys the books and rents them to customers to get the profit.” You may ask, why not just go to the local libraries? Well, for one, those shops are conveniently located near the residential areas or schools. Also, the book collection is primarily pop culture related (like comics, martial art novels, sci-fi, etc.), which are not always available in the local libraries. Last but not least, they rent them for such cheap price that it’s totally worth the money for books you don’t intend to keep.

My sister and I spent a great deal of time in those shops after school. We learned that if you got to know the owners well enough, they would let you sit there and read for free when you ran out of allowances at the end of the month and couldn’t afford the rental fees. We even had a girlhood dream to someday open such shop together so that we would never run out of books to read. The dream was never realized, and those shops no longer occupy every corner of the neighborhoods. The technology has changed how we acquire, read, and store our reading material, so my girlhood dream is to remain just that, a dream.

********************

p.s. To learn more about such bookshops, search “Kashi-hon” on google (link to Wikipedia here).

(Posted 18-Mar-2017)

The D'orsay Rules (The Trans Rating) and how they came to be...

The D’orsay Rules (also known as The Trans Rating) are a collection of conceptual statements to apply as a test to given representations and portrayals of trans people in books, film, stage, television, comics and sequential art, and related popular media that provides a rating scale of -10 ( really horrible) to +10 (really decent) with zero being the baseline default.

Using it is simple and straightforward: apply the statements as a test to your work.

The best one I have seen rates a three.

The Rules are:

The D’orsay Rules

A - Their Transition or Transness is not in and of itself the crux of story driving conflicts or humor

B - Their ability to do their job is not based in their Transness

C - Those who make pronoun or sex/gender based jokes are quickly chastised by other characters in the story, and made to look foolish as a result.

D - There is interaction with 2 or more other Trans people, and they talk about something other than hormones, surgeries, clothes, or activism

E - They are not only white, late transitioners from a middle class or better background

F - Trans women are held up as role models for women, Trans men as role models for men

G - They are not limited by the tropes applied to them as a result of their gender; Women are not limited to just women’s tropes, men are not limited to just men’s tropes

H - The story does not feature only trans women, or only trans men, and includes those who are both and neither

I - Those that are not Trans that they interact with are aware of terms like Cisgender, and avoid extraneous “-ed”s

J - Poverty, suicide, and workplace harassment are not portrayed as a choice of the Trans person, nor in a positive light.

The process of using this is fairly straight forward.

One point for each one they get right, minus one point for each one they get wrong.

This means the scale can run from -10 to +10. With 0 being a wash.


I was asked how I came up with the rules.

First, what they are is a tool intentionally designed for three purposes: to reflect the reality the lives of trans people are not solely consumed with the process of transition; to give writers a simple set of guidelines in writing trans characters that avoid the most common tropes which all come from ignorance of trans people’s lives; and to provide readers and critics (both popular and critical) with a way to rate the overall perception of the material.

The particular focus of the Rules is on writing characters for fiction, including writing for film and television as well as novels, and with an acknowledged eye to writing them for popular media in order to improve and increase the amount representation without falling into traps common when writing explicitly about any marginalized groups.

The idea came about as a direct result of a series of conversations that I witnessed and was involved in among a lot of different trans people throughout and following the process of releasing and preparing the first Trans 100.

I ruminated a bit on much if it, and then put out a call for considerations and thoughts on what trans people would like to see, in multiple trans communities and groups (including those such as the hbs and related segments), and also did a great deal of research into critical theory around the representation of other groups.

After going through the thousand or so responses, which included lots of discussion about how unsatisfied with representations in different situations people were, I sat down and gave a lot of thought to how to simplify all this material into ten simple rules.

I also had to deal with an issue in that there are different needs for two different groups. Those going through transition, and particularly those with less than three years going into it, were often wanting fiction and material that spoke to the need for resources being displayed, and that effectively portrayed the challenges in the emotional and social journey.

But those same people often wanted to read and see stuff about what life is like longer term, because much of what they expressed was that there wasn’t enough stuff showing trans people just living their lives.

Those with more than three years generally wanted to see things like how they lived their lives, when being trans wasn’t really all that important or big a deal in their life (because most of the time by then it isn’t that big a deal).

So the rules reflect the broad ideas of the community as a whole, and the need for positive portrayals, even in situations where the villan is a trans person.

That was then shifted by looking at the needs of a writer. To sell a story, you need to have one, and in the overwhelming number of cases, the conflict in the story arises because the character is trans.

This is because it makes sense to most writers that if you are going to introduce a trans characters that you should do so with the conflict centering around their Transness.

The problem with that is they often rely on the same simplistic, usually transphobic, basic ideas that they are already familiar with, because they only really ever get to see the same basic tropes presented.

So the Rules needed to accomplish the goals of thousands of trans people across multiple lines, while encouraging writers to step outside the already written and overused core involvements.

This also needed to escape the trap of such things as creating a token character who might have a limited arc explored briefly for the sake of inclusion, but then slowly fades to the background until they are effectively written out.

The Rules also needed to work cross genre, which can be difficult to do at times when they need to work as well for erotic fiction as they do for comedy, detective, horror, and fantasy.

In the grinding it all down to the root issues, I thought that I wasn’t going to be able to get to just ten. So that went put the window early, and the first iteration was thirty items long.

Some additional critical analysis allowed me to fold them into the current iteration you now see.

So, that is how the D’orsay Rules came to be. They represent the consensus and ideas of the trans community as a whole about what is wrong with the way that trans characters are portrayed, and proffer an effective way to avoid the usual traps of writing not just trans characters, but any marginalized group.

To the anon that asked, I hope this helps!

anonymous asked:

Part 1. I don't have anyone to talk to about my dreams and aspirations.. because here in my town, in Russia, what I want is a dream of a child that should be long forgotten. But now that I’m 20 years old, I've gathered up some courage and I’ll admit to myself - I love drawing because I've been doing it as long as I can remember and so I wish to come to America where the best animation is made (here it's pretty much dead) and become a storyboard artist..or concept artist or ANYTHING. I want to be

Part 2. .. involved. That’s all I know. But I’m lost. I know you aren’t supposed to know how to solve this, but any kind of advice now would be.. very special to me. Is getting an art degree in a university my only chance? I googled, didn’t help much. Did you get opportunities through tumblr? Should I concentrate on that and put more stuff out? After all, getting noticed online is easier than to expect that I’ve got a place in America..which now seems..unreachable.

Hey there. To be honest, I was thinking a lot about this question, and I’m not sure if I’m the right person to answer it. I am from America, and I recognize the privilege that comes from being born here, especially with regards to certain parts of the entertainment industry. 

I feel like it would be lazy of me to just say something like, “Keep drawing and eventually you’ll achieve your dreams.” A statement like that negates the amount of research that needs to come along with all the drawing. Really, the best advice I can possibly give you is that you need to do your research. I’m talking WAY beyond a simple Google search. You need to dig.

Research the animation industry in Europe, which most definitely exists. America is not the be-all, end-all of animation. Research other artists/illustrators who live overseas. At least 40 of the artists who participated in Ladies of Literature are international–many of them also hail from Europe, and there are tens of thousands more. Research animation schools or trade conventions that may be nearby, and online classes taught by industry professionals. Research online forums or other spaces, like tumblr and twitter, to put up your work, network, and find opportunities. And of course, keep drawing WHILE you’re discovering all this new information. Information is nothing without action.

I totally get how it might seem impossible to break into the industry when you’re so far away from where it’s all happening, but there are ways around it that don’t always involve going to Calarts or whatever big name art school. So many people in the industry got there by taking alternate paths that they had to carve out themselves. It’s scary, and some of it unfortunately comes from luck, but it’s absolutely possible. It’s up to you to find out how and where and what you can do to be ready when the luck hits you.

I hope this was helpful, and I apologize for being a bit vague. If you come off anon and email me, I can try to give you some advice that’s more specific to your work.

EDITED TO ADD: From ribkadory (who is a rad artist!)

Hey anon, i’m from Russia :) there are at least 3 fields you can work at in Russia: animation (Melnitsa or Wizart Animation), game development (tons and tons of companies to choose from), comic books (BUBBLE). It’s not that bad here in Russia (:

The D’orsay Rules (also known as The Trans Rating) are a collection of conceptual statements to apply as a test to given representations and portrayals of trans people in books, film, stage, television, comics and sequential art, and related popular media that provides a rating scale of -10 ( really horrible) to +10 (really decent) with zero being the baseline default.

Using it is simple and straightforward: apply the statements as a test to your work.

The Rules are:

The D’orsay Rules

A - Their Transition or Transness is not in and of itself the crux of story driving conflicts or humor

B - Their ability to do their job is not based in their Transness

C - Those who make pronoun or sex/gender based jokes are quickly chastised by other characters in the story, and made to look foolish as a result.

D - There is interaction with 2 or more other Trans people, and they talk about something other than hormones, surgeries, clothes, or activism

E - They are not only white, late transitioners from a middle class or better background

F - Trans women are held up as role models for women, Trans men as role models for men

G - They are not limited by the tropes applied to them as a result of their gender; Women are not limited to just women’s tropes, men are not limited to just men’s tropes

H - The story does not feature only trans women, or only trans men, and includes those who are both and neither

I - Those that are not Trans that they interact with are aware of terms like Cisgender, and avoid extraneous “-ed”s

J - Poverty, suicide, and workplace harassment are not portrayed as a choice of the Trans person, nor in a positive light.

The process of using this is fairly straight forward.

One point for each one they get right, minus one point for each one they get wrong.

This means the scale can run from -10 to +10. With 0 being a wash.


I was asked how I came up with the rules.

First, what they are is a tool intentionally designed for three purposes: to reflect the reality the lives of trans people are not solely consumed with the process of transition; to give writers a simple set of guidelines in writing trans characters that avoid the most common tropes which all come from ignorance of trans people’s lives; and to provide readers and critics (both popular and critical) with a way to rate the overall perception of the material.

The particular focus of the Rules is on writing characters for fiction, including writing for film and television as well as novels, and with an acknowledged eye to writing them for popular media in order to improve and increase the amount representation without falling into traps common when writing explicitly about any marginalized groups.

The idea came about as a direct result of a series of conversations that I witnessed and was involved in among a lot of different trans people throughout and following the process of releasing and preparing the first Trans 100.

I ruminated a bit on much if it, and then put out a call for considerations and thoughts on what trans people would like to see, in multiple trans communities and groups (including those such as the hbs and related segments), and also did a great deal of research into critical theory around the representation of other groups.

After going through the thousand or so responses, which included lots of discussion about how unsatisfied with representations in different situations people were, I sat down and gave a lot of thought to how to simplify all this material into ten simple rules.

I also had to deal with an issue in that there are different needs for two different groups. Those going through transition, and particularly those with less than three years going into it, were often wanting fiction and material that spoke to the need for resources being displayed, and that effectively portrayed the challenges in the emotional and social journey.

But those same people often wanted to read and see stuff about what life is like longer term, because much of what they expressed was that there wasn’t enough stuff showing trans people just living their lives.

Those with more than three years generally wanted to see things like how they lived their lives, when being trans wasn’t really all that important or big a deal in their life (because most of the time by then it isn’t that big a deal).

So the rules reflect the broad ideas of the community as a whole, and the need for positive portrayals, even in situations where the villan is a trans person.

That was then shifted by looking at the needs of a writer. To sell a story, you need to have one, and in the overwhelming number of cases, the conflict in the story arises because the character is trans.

This is because it makes sense to most writers that if you are going to introduce a trans characters that you should do so with the conflict centering around their Transness.

The problem with that is they often rely on the same simplistic, usually transphobic, basic ideas that they are already familiar with, because they only really ever get to see the same basic tropes presented.

So the Rules needed to accomplish the goals of thousands of trans people across multiple lines, while encouraging writers to step outside the already written and overused core involvements.

This also needed to escape the trap of such things as creating a token character who might have a limited arc explored briefly for the sake of inclusion, but then slowly fades to the background until they are effectively written out.

The Rules also needed to work cross genre, which can be difficult to do at times when they need to work as well for erotic fiction as they do for comedy, detective, horror, and fantasy.

In the grinding it all down to the root issues, I thought that I wasn’t going to be able to get to just ten. So that went put the window early, and the first iteration was thirty items long.

Some additional critical analysis allowed me to fold them into the current iteration you now see.

So, that is how the D’orsay Rules came to be. They represent the consensus and ideas of the trans community as a whole about what is wrong with the way that trans characters are portrayed, and proffer an effective way to avoid the usual traps of writing not just trans characters, but any marginalized group.

To the anon that asked, I hope this helps!

—  AED

I think about this picture a lot and I’m not quite sure why I like it so much but there’s just something about the juxtaposition between the quality of the art and the blandness of the water cooler small talk that I love

taken from The Authority v4 #1

art by Dustin Nguyen and Richard Friend

lettering by Jared K. Fletcher