combined with other factors

climates of coldsun

This whole things starts with my love affair with maps, my admiration and envy for Chris Wayans’ Planetocopia, and the desire for a setting whose most distinctive features are visible by looking at the map. So here’s a rough, very first-draft planetary map of Coldsun - a world where exposure to sunlight cools things down, rather than heats them up. 

(Caveats: don’t worry about the exact shape of the continents above, because it’ll change; don’t worry about the microphysics yet either. This is just about the general biomes and climate - and even there, imagery that appeals to me can get a pass as long as there’s some sort of baseline plausibility.) So!

The move obvious consequence is that things are colder near the equator than at the poles, the reverse of the usual situation.

However, the tropical regions aren’t packed with ice and snow because it’s actually pretty hard for ice and snow to form. This is because ice and snow have a high albedo, meaning they bounce back a lot of sunlight. In our world, with sunlight that heats things up, this means that ice and snow are somewhat self-reinforcing, leading to both snow piles that last longer than they otherwise would and to glacial feedback loops that lead to ice ages/hothouse periods - geological time periods where lots of ice cover, high albedo, and high temperature (or the reverse of those) reinforce one another. The world of Coldsun, by contrast, is homeostatic on this front. 

(Except, of course, if you’re dealing with massive fields and glaciers of sooty black ice! Burning coal can’t just cool things down by damaging the equivalent of the ozone layer (if there’s an equivalent of an ozone layer? idk yet) but by creating ice formations with a much lower and thus can last, maybe even spread under the right conditions. The civilizations here used to operate at a higher level of technology, but these factors (combined with a bunch of others less relevant to this post) led to a crash period.)

Coldsun’s climate bands reverse the wet/dry alteration of Earth. An Intertropical Divergence Zone near the equator starts things off with its falling, cold air and hence low levels of precipitation. A Subtropical Low around our own horse latitudes features rising air and high levels of precipitation, followed by a band of desert. And the hot polar zones feature high precipitation, rather than the cold desert conditions of our own poles.

Around this Subtropical Low, with its abundant water and sunlight, but cold conditions, we get evergreen jungles. Shaggy, warmblooded mammals occupy niches here that tropical frogs and other jungle denizens might in our own world. Snow and ice (with fewer climactic consequences) can form in the canopy, melting to nurse rivers in the winter. 

Fungal forests bloom in the poles, where the heat and precipitation would be ideal for life if not for the long sun-droughts. Photosynthesis-based plants grow crazy-quilt and kuzu-like in the summer before being devoured by mushrooms in the winter.

And the thick cactal forest region? That’s just a personal caprice - with the excuse being some sort of vast but deep aquifer supporting a dense growth of phreatophytes - rather than anything that flows out of the “cold sun” thing.

worldends4me  asked:

Why did Seymour's mother become such a horrific, grotesque looking aeon?

This is all speculation and I could’ve sworn I read something about this somewhere..

I think the major factors that it’s been influenced have been Jung’s personality theory, which you can read more about here and the Roman Catholic ‘Anima Sola’, which pictures as a soul in purgatory, having chains binding her wrist, which when broken has meant that she’s repented for her sins.

Combining this with something to do with her being so desperate to give her son some semblance of a normal life that in doing so, she became chained by it. Plus feelings about her own internal pain and struggle of not being able to do so combined with some many other factors (her illness, her marriage to Jyscal, the banishment, etc.) probably had something to do with it too.

The Jungian personality theory and the other religious meanings that are tied into her aeon design actually fit in quite well to the overall religious tones (plus a few minor ones) of the game itself. 

Mod 1

deadsrobinscircle  asked:

Hello ! I have a character who, because of a curse when they were born, is female during the day and male at night. But they have been forced during their whole life to act as if Day! And Night! were two different person (twins actually). Do you think after 19 years of life this way, they would develope a kind of dissociative personality disorder ? Do you have any tips on how to write this ? Besides, I'm french and there is no "they" neutral pronouns, so it's very hard for me to dissociate them

Thanks for your question, dear!  This is definitely a complex issue, but I have some links + some personal advice for you…

A brief disclaimer: I don’t have any experience with gender dysphoria, but I’ve done some general research on dysphoria and its relationship with dissociative identity disorder. I do, however, have personal experience with a person who has DID.  She’d probably lose her shit if she saw this, but since none of you know me, I think it’s safe to share…

So my mother has dissociative identity disorder.  It’s not something we talk about much anymore – she’s in therapy and keeps a lot of it to herself.  But I’ve experienced the ramifications of it growing up with her, and from the things I’ve heard/read from her therapy.  And it’s important to me that something like this gets realistic representation in fiction.

Anyway, I’ll write this in two sections, if that’s all right.  I’ll include what I’ve learned about it personally, as well as some articles for you to read on your own.


1. What causes dissociative identity disorder (DID)?

As you’ll find along with other information here, DID is commonly caused by some of the following:

  • Recurrent episodes of severe physical, emotional or sexual abuse (often in childhood).
  • Absence of safe and nurturing resources to overwhelming abuse or trauma.
  • Ability to dissociate easily.
  • Development of a coping style that helped during distress and the use of splitting as a survival skill.

I’ll address these points, and how they’re relevant to your story.  Firstly, while DID is most common in victims of child abuse, it’s certainly not exclusive to these cases.  The reason that it trends so high in child abuse is because DID results from a feeling of powerlessness and a lack of a safe environment, both of which are more easily achieved when living with one’s abuser.  Adults are less likely to develop this as they have outlets to be themselves and release this stress, instead of it pushing inward and fragmenting them that way.

It’s important to note also that not just any case of abuse will result in this kind of coping mechanism.  DID only arises when it is useful to the individual’s survival – for instance, if a child is physically abused whenever they stand up for themselves or talk back to their abuser, this part of their personality – the indignant part – may break off into its own fragment.  The remaining personality learns to come out when it is needed, in order to avoid abuse.

The other aspect of this disorder is depersonalization, another result of protecting oneself from abuse.  Depersonalization creates a feeling of the mind floating out of the body – even looking down on themselves from somewhere else – in order to isolate oneself from the abusive situation.  Sometimes depersonalization happens at random times post-abuse, creating a surreal or dissociative episode, in which the individual can even look into the mirror and fail to recognize themselves.  Again, this is typically due to strong abusive experiences.

So how does this relate to your character’s situation?
Well, it really depends on the history of the character.  Whether the character suffers abuse or not may be irrelevant – the most important factor is stress, often combining with other mental health issues, which pressurizes your character’s mind into compartmentalizing itself.  The identity confusion of switching between genders day and night could create enough personal dissociation to develop DID, but there are a couple of things to understand here:

1) There’s a difference between moods/states of mind and dissociative identities.  Your character may experience confusion and different “shades of self” without completely branching off into different parts (commonly called “alters” by the DID community).  Fragmented personality comes from a survival state of mind; your character’s situation may cause dysphoria, mood swings, manic/depressive phases, and/or depersonalization without developing into full-blown DID.  Be sure this is exactly what you’re looking for, because it’s a pretty extensive disorder and will take some research.
2) DID is largely related to the environment cultivating it.  Developing DID requires a certain amount of isolation, pressure, and instability.  A character with a strong support system or environmental constants is less likely to develop DID.  Consider the state of your character’s life: do they have friends, family, roommates, neighbors, or pets that can contribute to grounding them to their identity?  Do they live/work/study in an environment that is consistent despite their gender (e.g. working second shift, studying at the same school, or interacting with the same people with both identities)?  These factors make DID without abuse even less likely.
3) DID is the result of stress and confusion.  If your character was cursed from birth, this lifestyle would eventually become normal for them, I’d think.  Of course, it would be difficult to manage, but unless they undergo abuse or high stress because of it, I’m not sure they’d develop two identities from it.  In fact, I’d think bouncing between presented genders from a young age may normalize the experience.  Of course, that’s just an opinion and certainly not fact.


2. How do I realistically write a character with DID?

A note right here first: This isn’t my call to make as someone who’s never had DID, but I don’t know if I’d advise you to go ahead and write this.  These kinds of stories are best written by people who have experienced the disorder themselves (or at least have a level of psychology education).  I mean, as a rule I try not to discourage anyone’s ideas – but this is a disorder that already gets so much sh!t in the media…

Anyway.  If you decide that this is something you want to write, you’re gonna want to get it right – which means you’ll have to do some research.  Here is where I drop a bunch of links:


That’s all I’ve got for now.  If you have any further questions, my inbox is open, of course :)  I wish you luck in whatever you wind up doing with this character!  Thanks again, and good luck!


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask me!

My colleague : “i have to do visa applications and look for housing for when I go to the US to do my Masters at Columbia University, so if I want to be able to spend time with my boyfriend in the evenings, go with him to the gym, and cook a light and nutritious dinner for both of us, I have to leave work a bit earlier, which means I’ve been voluntarily getting up at 6 AM so I can eat a nice healthy breakfast, beat the rush hour crowd, and be at work by 8. Also I spent my day off yesterday cleaning underneath the fridge and going grocery shopping”

Me, a fucking queer nerd with legitimately crippling depression who’s been eating cheese crackers and watermelon for dinner since Friday and didn’t even get out of my PJs yesterday except to take an irresponsibly long shower : ….i am an alien please speak more slowly

EXO M’s s/o getting weaker because of her diet

MAJOR Trigger warning folks:

This will be dealing specifically with someone is not taking care of themselves because of their diet which ties in with their weight. Please read another one of our posts that do not involve this if this will trigger you in any way. 

Your mental health is important and we want all of our readers to be happy and healthy mentally, emotionally, and physically. 

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Something that really annoys me with fat shaming is a lot of overweight people (especially in America) can't exactly help it. Having to work long hours + healthy foods being more expensive than unhealthy foods just creates something they can't escape. Sure, they can try to exercise more, but that's not going to help them lose weight if they can't afford to eat healthy or have the luxury of time to cook those meals. Combine that with many other factors and well, people are going to be overweight.

It is true that there are a lot of factors to consider and like everything else, it isn’t always so black and white. That being said, we can’t perpetuate the harmful notion that obesity doesn’t cause health issues. Beautiful at every size? Yes! Healthy at every size? Sadly, no.

auberfeee  asked:

How do you think Atsushi just obeys and listens to his senpai Himuro? What may Himuro has done to get him listen to himself? Only through feeding him snacks and not annoying him?

Hi dear! Mmmmhh…I think it’s a combination of different factors.

1)Himuro is the sly type, who reads others very well. No doubt he quickly understood how to treat Murasakibara and how to gain his respect.

2)He plays basketball well. That’s the first requisite to be considered worthy by Murasakibara. I wouldn’t be surprised if they had a one on one already during the first practice, something similar to what Akashi did.

3)Sweets are necessary to keep Murasakibara quiet. He’s not going to stop using them.

4)Their personalities match well, they manage to not annoy each other. (usually.)

anonymous asked:

err, could u help me understand ikarishipping a bit more? because from ive seen, paul has little to no interest in dawn, and other than the good-girl/bad-guy couple trope, i cant see why people would like it?

Sure!

However, because ikari is such a strange ship, I think there are a few things that are important to understand about it. The first being where ikarishipping came from, the second being why ikarishipping is as popular as it is, and the third being why people ship ikarishipping at all.

To get the first point out of the way, let me take you back to circa 2006–the era just before the Diamond and Pearl’s anime release. Back then, Corocoro (the magazine from Japan that we all know of from its Pokemon game leaks) came out with a DP anime promotional image which featured Dawn, Paul, and Ash. With no context to go off of, people jumped onto the characters immediately. Of course, AshxPoke Girl shippers sprung up as they always do at the start of the new anime series, however, at this time war was raging between the currently popular Pokeshipping and Advanceshipping. So while there were people who immediately jummped onto the AshxNew Girl ship, most people stuck to their Poke/Advance guns. That left New Guy (Paul–who at the time was actually dubbed Nugai by the fans) and New Girl (who was only known as Hikari). And, as they will, shippers will be shippers and pounced on New GuyxNew Girl almost immediately without any kind of context (especially since, at the time, Paul was rumored to be the new third companion, replacing Brock). As such, ikarishipping was basically born with zero context of what their interactions would be like, based solely on the fact that they were new main male and female characters. That being said, ikarishipping was not born out of their interactions in canon, but rather, people’s desire to ship the new male and female characters.

Next, it’s important to understand why ikarishipping is as popular as it is today. I feel like one thing that’s important to consider is, at the time, most of these shippers were 12-16 year old girls in 2006. For those of you who were maybe too young to remember 2006 or just weren’t around the fandom, besides palletshipping, nearly all of the most popular ship were “attractive” m/f pairings. It’s just the way things were. As such, that automatically knocked out f/f or m/m pairings that may have become popular had the characters been opposite gender (i.e. appealshipping, comashipping, coldcoffeeshipping, ostentatiousshipping, etc.). That’s not to say that these ships aren’t popular in their own right (coma being especially popular), but ikari undoubtedly is the most popular of the Dawn and Paul ships. That might bring up the question as to why penguinshipping isn’t as popular. Well, like I said, shippers stick to their guns. Many people had already established themselves as ikarishippers by the time Kenny was introduced in the anime. Plus, Kenny, to many fans, was a far blander character than Paul (in both personality and appearance)–and many weren’t crazy about the way he pined for Dawn (honestly, a lot of people just looked for excuses to hate Kenny for the sake of ikarishipping).

Of course, it’s also important to note that Dawn and Paul were both A. attractive characters of the opposite sex who look good together and B. they did have that bad-boy/good-girl feel to them that was so popular back then. As such, with all of these factors combined, ikarishipping ultimately triumphed over all of the other Dawn and Paul shippings–even if it did lack the canon evidence. And all of that hype from back in 2006 still rubs off on the Pokemon anime community today. That’s largely because when something is that popular in a fandom at one point in time (even with lack of evidence), it’s going to remain popular in years to come (look at poke, contest, and pallet, for example). Fanfiction, AMVs, and fan art are already all over the internet of this pairing. People both old and new to the fandom will see this, and it will most likely rub off on them–especially since Paul and Dawn do have that m/f aesthetically pleasing look to them. People jump on the hype train because they’re naturally drawn to what is considered to be most popular. Not to mention, people who were ikarishippers way back in 2006 are likely still ikarishippers today as well.

With all of that behind us, that brings us to why, today in 2016, people ship ikarishipping at all. And well, there are a few reasons why and it honestly all depends on the shipper. The most popular reason is the reason I stated above. People ship it by default out of the desire to ship. They see what’s popular and they take it (thus why ikari is usually grouped in with the “straight four”, poke/contest/ikari/leafgreen). I won’t get into the nitty gritties of that one too much since I basically talked about it above. But since it’s popular, people don’t need the evidence. They just want to ship. The second reason is solely based on aesthetic. It’s undeniable that Dawn and Paul look aesthetically pleasing side-by-side. Their pallets complement each other well with the blues, purples, and pinks. Paul is the hard-looking boy while Dawn is the bubbly looking girl. There’s also the aesthetic of their personalities–the good, bubbly girl and bad, stoic boy. People eat that stuff up like crazy. They don’t need the canon evidence to support it as long as they have their desire aesthetically. Another reason, and the reason why we ship ikarishipping, is because of the relationship potential.

I’ll be honest with you, Kelly and I hated ikarishipping back when it first became popular in 2006. We were two angry 13-year-olds who couldn’t possibly understand what anyone saw in it. We were bent on only supporting ships if they had canon evidence (thus why pokeshipping and contestshipping were our only ships at the time). It wasn’t until we were in our 20s that we actually started to consider ikarishipping–and it was largely because of @pkmncoordinators’s wonderful fanfiction, “The Ash Connection”. We really enjoyed the way that ikarishipping was portrayed in her story, and thought that maybe it could have potential after all. Thus, getting into why we ship ikarishipping: Different fans might interpret their relationship differently, but Kelly and I truly enjoy ikarishipping because, as people and as trainers, Dawn and Paul are so drastically different from each other. Paul is reserved and rather stern, whereas Dawn is open and bright. We fully acknowledge that there is no canon evidence to support ikarishipping, but we feel as though there is a lot that the two could take away from each other, both to grow stronger as individuals and as trainers. I don’t really want to get into it all too much, but if you’d like to know more about our ikarishipping headcanon, which focuses on how they go from strangers, to friends, to falling in love, I’d suggest checking out our ikarishipping fanfiction, Lock and Key! That being said, Kelly and I base a lot of our ships around interaction and chemistry potential, even if the two characters have never interacted in canon (our most obscure ship being Brendan and Hilda).

I realize I probably haven’t painted ikarishipping in the most positive light within this response. I mean, its popularity is based heavily around the heteronormative idea of pairing an attractive man and an attractive woman together. But honestly, there are a lot of wonderful people in the ikarishipping fandom who have managed to turn it into a lot more than that. We know a lot of incredible ikarishippers with wonderful headcanons surrounding the two–shippers who have done a great job interpreting their relationship and making it a lot more than “the aesthetically pleasing bad-boy and good-girl”. I feel that what’s most fun about the ikarishipping fandom actually is the fact that it lacks canon evidence. It gives people so much room to explore their potential relationship if they did interact and create something of their own through fanfiction or headcanon or art! It’s a very open place for people who enjoy being creative. Granted, each fandom has its bad eggs, and there are a bunch of really bad/borderline abusive fan-concepts that float around (as there are with any ship), but the amazing people outweigh that for us. As such, I think the community itself is a big reason as to why people choose to ship ikari–because it’s full of awesome people with great ideas!

I know I’ve probably rambled a lot, and maybe this didn’t make any sense to you at all. But that’s just my opinion! Again, ikari is a very strange ship considering its lack of evidence and popularity. But I feel like, regardless of the reason as to why people may choose to ship it, shipping is ultimately for fun. So as long as ikarishippers are having fun doing what they’re doing, then the reason why doesn’t really matter too much! And if ikarishipping just isn’t your cup of tea, then that’s okay as well–it’s definitely an acquired taste!

I’ve been too busy with commissions to do a F:NM entry so instead have some character designs in progress (which is why they’re unclothed- though Boomer is fairly unfinished at the base level here too).

Since not everyone can have an evil twin, the idea instead is to make parallel characters by combining factors from various other incarnations of the characters. They’re their own, unrelated individuals.

Emotions Are Not Facts

Emotions are real. 

When you feel emotions what you’re feeling is true insofar as you really are feeling scared, sad, angry, happy etc. Whether or not you ‘should’ feel a certain way, you feel what you feel. Emotions don’t have to be rational. Sometimes even when there is a reason (or reasons) for how you feel it might not be an obvious one (i.e. are you upset over what’s currently upsetting you, or is it a combination of factors: tired, hungry, being reminded of other things).

However, just because emotions are real doesn’t mean the emotion is based on fact. 

“Sometimes we treat emotions as if they are facts about the world: The stronger the emotion, the stronger our belief that the emotion is based on fact. (Ex: If I feel unsure, I am incompetent” “If I get lonely when left alone, I shouldn’t be left alone” “If I feel confident about something, it is right” “if I’m afraid, there must be danger” “I love him, so he must be OK” - Marsha Linehan 

We must realize that emotions are not facts and how we feel about something doesn’t dictate the truth. Feeling hurt doesn’t mean you’re the victim. Feeling angry doesn’t mean someone else deserves to pay for it. Feeling guilty doesn’t mean you’re responsible or deserve to be punished.

That doesn’t mean we should ignore our emotions. It’s important to understand how we feel and our own needs. A ‘gut feeling’ can be important warning. The answer instead is to ask ourselves if our emotions check out with the facts. To step back, look at a situation rationally, and allow our emotions and our reasoning guide us.

If we rely purely on emotions, we tend to ignore the facts. We must make choices based on the facts available to us and if we rely too much on emotions, as though they were facts, we might ignore reality and behave in ways that are harmful to ourselves or others. 

prophetofslaughter  asked:

Hello. Does Sue Klebold realise how abnormal the Columbine school is/was? The whole jock and prepp stuff, the bullying, students doing religious harassment, etc. it sounds like a breeding ground for mental injuries and violent resentment. Does she ever make a connection between what happened and the school itself?

I’ll let Sue address this via excerpt quotes from her book “A Mother’s Reckoning”

“In early January of 1998, Dylan told Tom about his frustration with a couple of kids at school who were “really asking for it.” The kids were freshmen, and Tom resisted the temptation to laugh: Dylan was six feet four inches tall, and a junior. Dylan told us he wanted to get some guys together to confront the boys. Tom and I told him not to give them the satisfaction of a response. I was worried someone would be hurt, and Tom was worried Dylan would embarrass
himself by engaging with freshmen.

Dylan could not let it go. Without our knowledge, he and Eric rounded up some friends. They confronted the kids and told them to meet them at a spot away from school, but the younger boys never appeared. Tom and I found out about the planned rumble after the fact. Dylan believed he had handled the situation effectively, but we were upset and told him so. At least, I thought, no one had been hurt.”

“Tom believes, as (Author Ralph) Larkin does, that the culture at Columbine was toxic, and a desire for revenge motivated the attack the boys launched on the school. Many  experts disagree: despite Larkin’s claim that the propane bombs Dylan and Eric placed in the cafeteria were put under
the tables where the jocks typically sat, they did not target popular kids or athletes during the attack, or anyone at all. (Of the forty-eight shooters profiled in Dr. Langman’s book School Shooters: Understanding High School, College, and Adult Perpetrators, only one of them specifically targeted a bully.) Furthermore, there is almost no mention of bullying in Dylan’s journal. If anything, he appears to have envied the jocks for their social comfort and ease with girls.

I personally fall somewhere in the middle. Bullying, however severe, is not an excuse for physical retaliation or violence, much less mass murder. But I do believe Dylan was bullied, and that along with many other factors, and perhaps in combination with them, bullying probably did play some role in what he did. Given Dylan’s temperament and core personality traits, it’s easy to understand why being bullied would have been especially hurtful to him. He hated to be wrong, and didn’t like to lose. He was extremely self-conscious and critical of
himself. (Relentless self-criticism is, incidentally, another sign of depression.) He liked to feel self-reliant, and wanted to be perceived as someone who was in control. This sense of himself would have been badly eroded with each incident. Apparently, they were common.

One day, Dylan came home, his shirt spotted with ketchup. He refused to tell me what had happened, only that he’d had “the worst day of his life.” I pressed, but Dylan downplayed it, and I let him. Kids have disagreements, I thought. Whatever it is, it’ll blow over—and if it doesn’t, I’ll know. There has been reporting that the incident was more serious than I could ever have
imagined: a circle of boys taunting Dylan and Eric, shoving them, spraying them with ketchup, and suggesting they were gay. That incident alone may not explain the deadly kinship forged between the boys, but it is the kind of shared humiliation in which a bond is formed.  Tom and I were aware of another incident.

Junior year, Dylan had a parking space in a remote lot next to the school grounds. A few weeks after he confronted the freshmen, he told his father his car wasn’t running well. Tom found the hood flattened as if someone had stood on it, leaving an indentation deep enough to damage the fuse box. Dylan said
he hadn’t noticed the dent. Tom asked him outright if the freshmen had intentionally damaged his car. Dylan said he didn’t know when or how it had happened, although he was certain it had happened in the school parking lot. The car was old, and we’d never expected it to survive high school without a
few dings. But our failure to find out what happened to it is one thing I regret.”

“Tom and I did not perceive Dylan as being unpopular; he simply had too many friends for us to see him that way. Unfortunately, we did not have the slightest idea what his daily life was really like at school….”

“It mirrors our own conversations, too. One of Dylan’s friends told me he’d never seen any examples of students mistreating other students—and then, in the very next breath, told me about kids hurling a soda can full of tobacco spit in his direction at a school sporting event. Another of Dylan’s friends (Brooks Brown as recounted in his book No Easy Answers) told us a car full of kids threw glass bottles and other trash at their group as they drove by. (Larkin reports that throwing trash from moving cars at lower-caste students was common.) A resigned Dylan tried to comfort a horrified newcomer to the group: “You get used to it. It happens all the time.

It hurts that it was so easy for Dylan to hide what his life was like at school. I still have dreams in which I discover his hidden pain. In one, I am undressing him, still a toddler, for a bath. I pull his shirt off and see a bloody network of concealed cuts across his torso. Even writing about it now makes me cry.

Dylan’s struggles may have been hidden from us, but they were not uncommon ones. A 2011 study by the Centers for Disease Control found that 20 percent of high school students nationwide reported they had been bullied on school property in the thirty days before the survey; an even higher percentage reported they’d been bullied on social media. Anti-bullying
advocates suggest the number may be closer to 30 percent.

A tremendous amount of research has been done on the effects of peer harassment, and there is unquestionably a correlation between bullying and brain health disorders that stretches all the way into adulthood. A Duke University study found that, compared with kids who weren’t
bullied, those who were had four times the prevalence of agoraphobia, generalized anxiety, and panic disorder as adults. The bullies themselves had four times the risk of developing antisocial personality disorder.

There is also a strong association between bullying and depression and suicide. Both being a victim and bullying others is related to high risks of depression, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. Researchers at Yale found that victims of bullying were two to nine times more likely to report suicidal thoughts than other children.

The connection between bullying and violence toward others is more complicated, although again there’s a correlation. Bullied kids often become bullies themselves, which appears to be what happened with Dylan and Eric. Larkin cites a student who claims they terrorized her brother, a student with special needs, so badly he was afraid to come to school. Researchers
call students who both bully and suffer bullying “bully-victims,” and find that these bully-victims are at the greatest psychological risk. “Their numbers, compared to those never involved in bullying, tell the story: 14 times the risk of panic disorder, 5 times the risk of depressive disorders, and 10 times the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior.”

The humiliation and degradation Dylan experienced at the hands of his schoolmates likely did contribute to his psychological state. At some point his anger, which had for years been directed toward himself, began to turn outward, and the idea of personal destruction he found so comforting began to include others. Repeated incidents of disrespect at school, an environment that should have been safe, may very well have constituted the pivot point.
Of course, even if Dylan did endure humiliation at the hands of his classmates, it cannot absolve him in any way of responsibility for what he did. At the same time, I have deep regrets I wasn’t more in tune with Dylan’s feelings about the place he spent his days. I wish I had spent much more time and energy on determining the climate and culture of the school (and how appropriate it was for Dylan) than on assessing it academically.

Once in a while, I allow myself to fantasize about the thousand ways the story could have ended differently, and all of those fantasies begin with a different school. My biggest regret, though, is that I did not do whatever it would have taken to know what Dylan’s internal life was really like.”

meme analysis: snoun (snake noun)/snoun (snail noun)

origin: likely stemmed from several sources. the term “sneeple,” a portmanteau of “snake” and “people” was coined by the steven universe episode Keep Beach City Weird which aired October 30th, 2014. snail form was first established in tumblr user rhubabe’s “take me to snurch” post, which was posted on March 14th, 2015. the confusion and overlap of snake church and snail church probably occurred due to the popularization of these snake church ads, originally posted by tumblr user parasitequeen.

usual form of the meme: short text post

is the meme self-aware (are people generally aware of its meme status): yes

is the meme an “event meme” that is only applicable to a certain day or event: no

meme accessibility (how easy is this meme to create): high (easily applied to song lyrics, etc)

potential for combination with other existing memes: high

fandom factor: spread of meme has been assisted by association with steven universe but also exists outside the realm of fandom

fanart potential: low

repetitiveness: semi-high

potential to become a “mainstream meme": mid to low

hypothesis: meme has grown too much within a short period of time. popularity bubble will eventually burst. will probably not last until the end of the month, so get ‘em while they’re hot

anonymous asked:

Do you ever do the thing where you're really upset and you just try to sow discord among others? The wording is a bit dramatic but I've noticed that sometimes when I get annoyed enough (combined with other factors) that I'll do my best to start arguments and make other people upset. It's strange because it's kind of unconscious but also very purposeful and focused. There's another boy in my grade who does something similar but I don't think he's as conscious of it as I am.

Okay, I laughed at this one for a solid five minutes. Yes, I do this, and I really think it’s only because I can. I do it when I’m annoyed, but sometimes I just do it because I’m bored. (I’m a horrible person. probably.)

INTPs are able to do this pretty easily because we’re gifted at getting to the heart of a situation. We can easily see the flaws in other’s arguments, so we are able to throw an argument or conversation into chaos pretty quickly. Others are emotionally invested in the conversation, but we’re not, so we don’t mind saying something we don’t necessarily believe in order to stir up an argument. Other times, we can figure out exactly what to say in order to get others to start fighting and then back out before anyone realizes that we actually caused the fight. I think INTPs get away with a lot shit doing this kind of thing.

When I’m personally angry (rare), I can get really nasty. There have been a few instances where I just kept pushing and pushing at someone’s weakness until they snapped. It’s not something I’m particularly proud of, but to be fair, if you’ve made me genuinely angry, you probably did something pretty bad.

anonymous asked:

Hi I'm interested in studing interior design next year but I don't know a lot of the career. Can you explain me some general things of it? Also do I need to be good at drawing?

Interior designers need to be creative, imaginative and artistic. They also need to be disciplined, organized and skilled business people. Combining aesthetic vision with practical skills and knowledge, interior designers work with clients to develop design solutions that are “aesthetically appealing, technically sophisticated and pragmatically satisfying.”

Originally posted by luxuryon

Keep reading

Attention, all!

Hussie has put up a brand new news post in which (after one of his trademark Funny Monologues) he goes into detail about the rules of god tier death and resurrection, in light of controversy over recent events.

So here’s the gist of it:

  • Jade and Jane weren’t so much being “normally" mind controlled - they more accurately had their ethical filters removed, allowing them to act on impulses they normally wouldn’t. This would explain why they still appear to be having normal conversation while under the Condesce’s control. Their behavior is still compromised, however, so it’s a close call. A very important factor in those close calls is how luck allows close calls to break in Aranea’s favor, which is why (in combination with the other factors) they earned Just deaths.
  • Jake’s first god tier death was clearly not Heroic, and even more clearly nowhere near Just. He was kinda just floating there, "blustering Ronald Reagan quotes at the top of his lungs when Jane forked him,” as Hussie put it, so he was able to revive.
  • The second time Jake died as a god tier was very similar to Dave’s god tier death: Jake jumped in front of a friend in an attempt to save her life, and Dave was trying to rescue a dead friend to have her revived. Both very typically, even archetypally Heroic actions.
  • As for Rose. Many people compare her case to John’s, when he revived after fighting Jack. Both were fighting villainous adversaries, so why did he live and Rose died? According to Hussie, by the rules of the system, it’s simple. Heroic intent alone means nothing, it’s action that counts. Rose leapt into action, where John didn’t even have the chance to move.
  • The other question people ask is how a vengeful act counts as Heroic. Hussie himself says he personally doesn’t believe vengeance to be Heroic, but puts forward the following point: if being angry or vengeful exempt your actions from being counted as Heroic, then that would be far too easy of a loophole for god tier players to manipulate to stay alive.

Unfortunately, Hussie didn’t address the case of Aranea here, or Just deaths in much detail at all, but I believe the narrative intent was clear enough that destroying a session like she did, with deliberate intent to doom a timeline, could be counted as a highly villainous course of action.

I was looking through aro labels to try to find one that fit my exact feelings, but I came up with nothing. So I decided to coin a new term! (mostly for myself, but I would be glad if others found it useful to them!)

Klaperomantic (KLAP-pee romantic), from the Greek for “stolen.”:

When you feel as though your ability (or potential) to experience traditional romantic attraction has been taken away from you due to abuse, trauma, neurodivergency, illness, or any other similar factor, including any combination of them.

anonymous asked:

can you list and explain every single sexual orientation, please?

Advocate: a person who actively works to end intolerance, educate others, and support social equity for a group

Ally: a straight person who supports queer people

Androgyny: (1) a gender expression that has elements of both masculinity and femininity; (2) occasionally used in place of “intersex” to describe a person with both female and male anatomy

Androsexual/Androphilic: attracted to males, men, and/or masculinity

Asexual: a person who generally does not experience sexual attraction (or very little) to any group of people

Bigender: a person who fluctuates between traditionally “woman” and “man” gender-based behavior and identities, identifying with both genders (and sometimes a third gender)

Binary Gender: a traditional and outdated view of gender, limiting possibilities to “man” and “woman”

Binary Sex: a traditional and outdated view of sex, limiting possibilities to “female” or “male”

Biological sex: the physical anatomy and gendered hormones one is born with, generally described as male, female, or intersex, and often confused with gender

Bisexual: a person who experiences sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction to people of their own gender as well as another gender; often confused for and used in place of “pansexual”

Cisgender: a description for a person whose gender identity, gender expression, and biological sex all align (e.g., man, masculine, and male)

Cis-man: a person who identifies as a man, presents himself masculinely, and has male biological sex, often referred to as simply “man”

Cis-woman: a person who identifies as a woman, presents herself femininely, and has female biological sex, often referred to as simply “woman”

Closeted: a person who is keeping their sexuality or gender identity a secret from many (or any) people, and has yet to “come out of the closet”

Coming Out: the process of revealing your sexuality or gender identity to individuals in your life; often incorrectly thought to be a one-time event, this is a lifelong and sometimes daily process; not to be confused with “outing”

Cross-dressing: wearing clothing that conflicts with the traditional gender expression of your sex and gender identity (e.g., a man wearing a dress) for any one of many reasons, including relaxation, fun, and sexual gratification; often conflated with transsexuality

Drag King: a person who consciously performs “masculinity,” usually in a show or theatre setting, presenting an exaggerated form of masculine expression, often times done by a woman; often confused with “transsexual” or “transvestite”

Drag Queen: a person who consciously performs “femininity,” usually in a show or theatre setting, presenting an exaggerated form of feminine expression, often times done by a man; often confused with “transsexual” or “transvestite”

Dyke: a derogatory slang term used for lesbian women; reclaimed by many lesbian women as a symbol of pride and used as an in-group term

Faggot: a derogatory slang term used for gay men; reclaimed by many gay men as a symbol of pride and used as an in-group term

Female: a person with a specific set of sexual anatomy (e.g.,  46,XX phenotype, vagina, ovaries, uterus, breasts, higher levels of estrogen, fine body hair) pursuant to this label

Fluid(ity): generally with another term attached, like gender-fluid or fluid-sexuality, fluid(ity) describes an identity that is a fluctuating mix of the options available (e.g., man and woman, gay and straight); not to be confused with “transitioning”

FTM/MTF: a person who has undergone medical treatments to change their biological sex (Female To Male, or Male To Female), often times to align it with their gender identity; often confused with “trans-man”/”trans-woman”

Gay: a term used to describe a man who is attracted to men, but often used and embraced by women to describe their same-sex relationships as well

Gender Expression: the external display of gender, through a combination of dress, demeanor, social behavior, and other factors, generally measured on a scale of masculinity and femininity

Gender Identity: the internal perception of an individual’s gender, and how they label themselves

Genderless: a person who does not identify with any gender

Genderqueer: (1) a blanket term used to describe people whose gender falls outside of the gender binary; (2) a person who identifies as both a man and a woman, or as neither a man nor a woman; often used in exchange with “transgender”

Gynesexual/Gynephilic: attracted to females, women, and/or femininity

Hermaphrodite: an outdated medical term used to describe someone who is intersex; not used today as it is considered to be medically stigmatizing, and also misleading as it means a person who is 100% male and female, a biological impossibility for humans

Heterosexism: behavior that grants preferential treatment to heterosexual people, reinforces the idea that heterosexuality is somehow better or more “right” than queerness, or ignores/doesn’t address queerness as existing

Heterosexual: a medical definition for a person who is attracted to someone with the other gender (or, literally, biological sex) than they have; often referred to as “straight”

Homophobia: fear, anger, intolerance, resentment, or discomfort with queer people, often focused inwardly as one begins to question their own sexuality

Homosexual: a medical definition for a person who is attracted to someone with the same gender (or, literally, biological sex) they have, this is considered an offensive/stigmatizing term by many members of the queer community; often used incorrectly in place of “lesbian” or “gay”

Hypersex(ual/-ity): a sexual attraction with intensity bordering on insatiability or addiction; recently dismissed as a non-medical condition by the American Psychiatric Association when it was proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders version 5.

Intersex: a person with a set of sexual anatomy that doesn’t fit within the labels of female or male (e.g., 47,XXY phenotype, uterus, and penis)

Male: a person with a specific set of sexual anatomy (e.g.,  46,XY phenotype, penis, testis, higher levels of testosterone, coarse body hair, facial hair) pursuant to this label

Outing [someone]: when someone reveals another person’s sexuality or gender identity to an individual or group, often without the person’s consent or approval; not to be confused with “coming out”

Pansexual: a person who experiences sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction for members of all gender identities/expressions

Queer: (1) historically, this was a derogatory slang term used to identify LGBTQ+ people; (2) a term that has been embraced and reclaimed by the LGBTQ+ community as a symbol of pride, representing all individuals who fall out of the gender and sexuality “norms”

Questioning: the process of exploring one’s own sexual orientation, investigating influences that may come from their family, religious upbringing, and internal motivations

Same Gender Loving (SGL): a phrase coined by the African American/Black queer communities used as an alternative for “gay” and “lesbian” by people who may see those as terms of the White queer community

Sexual Orientation: the type of sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction one feels for others, often labeled based on the gender relationship between the person and the people they are attracted to; often mistakenly referred to as “sexual preference”

Sexual Preference: (1) generally when this term is used, it is being mistakenly interchanged with “sexual orientation,” creating an illusion that one has a choice (or “preference”) in who they are attracted to; (2) the types of sexual intercourse, stimulation, and gratification one likes to receive and participate in

Skoliosexual: attracted to genderqueer and transsexual people and expressions (people who aren’t identified as cisgender)

Straight: a man or woman who is attracted to people of the other binary gender than themselves; often referred to as “heterosexual”

Third Gender: (1) a person who does not identify with the traditional genders of “man” or “woman,” but identifies with another gender; (2) the gender category available in societies that recognize three or more genders

Transgender: a blanket term used to describe all people who are not cisgender; occasionally used as “transgendered” but the “ed” is misleading, as it implies something happened to the person to make them transgender, which is not the case

Transitioning: a term used to describe the process of moving from one sex/gender to another, sometimes this is done by hormone or surgical treatments

Transsexual: a person whose gender identity is the binary opposite of their biological sex, who may undergo medical treatments to change their biological sex, often times to align it with their gender identity, or they may live their lives as the opposite sex; often confused with “trans-man”/”trans-woman”

Transvestite: a person who dresses as the binary opposite gender expression (“cross-dresses”) for any one of many reasons, including relaxation, fun, and sexual gratification; often called a “cross-dresser,” and often confused with “transsexual”

Trans-man: a person who was assigned a female sex at birth, but identifies as a man; often confused with “transsexual man” or “FTM”

Trans-woman: a person who was assigned a male sex at birth, but identifies as a woman; often confused with “transsexual woman” or “MTF”

Two-Spirit: a term traditionally used by Native American people to recognize individuals who possess qualities or fulfill roles of both genders

List of LGBTQ+ Term Definitions G till P

Note: some definitions here may include words you aren’t familiar with, or have been taught a flawed or incomplete definition for (founded on internet)

Gay: a term used to describe a man who is attracted to men, but often used and embraced by women to describe their same-sex relationships as well

Gender Expression: the external display of gender, through a combination of dress, demeanor, social behavior, and other factors, generally measured on a scale of masculinity and femininity

Gender Identity: the internal perception of an individual’s gender, and how they label themselves

Genderless: a person who does not identify with any gender

Genderqueer: (1) a blanket term used to describe people whose gender falls outside of the gender binary; (2) a person who identifies as both a man and a woman, or as neither a man nor a woman; often used in exchange with “transgender”

Gynesexual/Gynephilic: attracted to females, women, and/or femininity

Hermaphrodite: an outdated medical term used to describe someone who is intersex; not used today as it is considered to be medically stigmatizing, and also misleading as it means a person who is 100% male and female, a biological impossibility for humans

Heterosexism: behavior that grants preferential treatment to heterosexual people, reinforces the idea that heterosexuality is somehow better or more “right” than queerness, or ignores/doesn’t address queerness as existing

Heterosexual: a medical definition for a person who is attracted to someone with the other gender (or, literally, biological sex) than they have; often referred to as “straight”

Homophobia: fear, anger, intolerance, resentment, or discomfort with queer people, often focused inwardly as one begins to question their own sexuality

Homosexual: a medical definition for a person who is attracted to someone with the same gender (or, literally, biological sex) they have, this is considered an offensive/stigmatizing term by many members of the queer community; often used incorrectly in place of “lesbian” or “gay”

Hypersex(ual/-ity): a sexual attraction with intensity bordering on insatiability or addiction; recently dismissed as a non-medical condition by the American Psychiatric Association when it was proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders version 5.

Intersex: a person with a set of sexual anatomy that doesn’t fit within the labels of female or male (e.g., 47,XXY phenotype, uterus, and penis)

Male: a person with a specific set of sexual anatomy (e.g.,  46,XY phenotype, penis, testis, higher levels of testosterone, coarse body hair, facial hair) pursuant to this label

Outing [someone]: when someone reveals another person’s sexuality or gender identity to an individual or group, often without the person’s consent or approval; not to be confused with “coming out”

Pansexual: a person who experiences sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction for members of all gender identities/expressions