columbine: a true crime story

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- ed kemper
- richard ramirez
- adam lanza
- richard speck
- the manson family
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- american horror story
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like/reblog if you are an account based on, post, or have posted any of the following;

- columbine
- dylan klebold
- eric harris
- dylann roof
- natural born killers
- jeff dahmer
- ted bundy
- ed kemper
- richard ramirez
- adam lanza
- richard speck
- the manson family
- jahar tsarnaev
- true crime community

- serial killers

- mass murderers

- anythinggggg true crime related

- criminal minds
- horror movies
- anything horror related

and I’ll follow you back

Grandparents of Eric Harris


Richard Pool was born in 1922 and passed away in 2015 at the age of 93.

Elaine Pool was born in 1924.


On the day of Columbine, at around 6:00 p.m., Pool neighbor Steve Ferguson noticed cars belonging to Pool’s relatives when he got home from work, but he didn’t go over to the Pool’s home that day. He called them two days after. 

He said: ,,Elaine, so what’s going on? I noticed the cars over there the night of Columbine. Did something tragic happen to a grandson or granddaughter?’’

Elaine, Eric’s grandmother, said: ,,Yes, I had a grandson that was killed, that was killed in the Columbine shootings.’’

He expressed his condolences and extended his sympathy. Then he asked: ,,Which one was he?’’

Elaine broke down and said: ,,My gosh, he was the killer.’’

He then asked the name of the grandson.

,,Harris’’, his grandmother said.

,,His name is Harris.’


The weekend after Columbine, Ferguson was doing chores outside his house. Richard Pool, Eric’s grandfather, came over with tears streaming down his cheeks. He was emotionally shot, he tried to explain a little bit what was going on.

Ferguson said: ,,You don’t have to explain.’’ Again, he extented his condolences and his feelings. ,,This has got to be tearing you apart.’’

Mr. Pool acknowledged that, and he just said it’s tough. He said it’s eatin him alive. He said he can’t sleep.

Mr. Pool said: ,,It will never be the same for us, ever.’’ 

Ferguson does not believe the Pools mentioned their grandson ever again.

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Dylan was intimidated by girls. He did the sound board for theater, where he liked being around other “weirdos,” but in general did not know how to interact with other people. He liked learning, but not school. He had girl friends, but never a girlfriend. (Tom Klebold says Dylan would go out with a group of friends; what Tom called “group dating.”) 
  It wasn’t a romantic relationship but in the summer of 1997 Dylan met Devon Adams through friends she had at BlackJack. Devon, two years younger, would be entering Columbine as a freshman. 
  By the time school started Devon was friendly enough with Eric and Dylan to have breakfast and lunch with them. Dylan was not a morning person, and would sleep until noon or 1:00 p.m. on the weekends if he could. For breakfast he would eat donuts and orange juice, or soda pop. Sitting in the middle of the cafeteria, Eric and Dylan would do class work. Or at least pretend to. They could quote every line from the movie Natural Born Killers and Dylan, usually dressed in jeans and a T-shirt, preferred to talk. Devon also says she was marked for speaking with Dylan: A jock would say, “Why are you talking to that faggot? Are you a dyke?" 

Devon never saw the violence when Dylan was alive. When they whacked each other with foam noodles in the pool, it was all fun and games. Other guys tackled her when they played football, but not Dylan. And when she cut her leg on the field, Dylan flipped out. He called a time out and washed her leg off. He didn’t like dogs and was scared of Devon’s Siberian Husky, but dealt with the animal, again, out of respect for her. 
  "He didn’t want to disrupt anything, you know?” Devon says. “He was always very respectful of everything." 
  Devon did see flashes of anger in Dylan. It might be a "dumb” occasion like getting a bad test grade. Or a spat over something inconsequential. At first, Dylan suppressed the anger. “I remember one time when he and I got in a fight cause I said something I shouldn’t have to him; I was just really, really angry at him, I don’t remember why, I was just mad at him, and he just walked away, and I don’t know if he ever got really mad about it. But he just walked away, and he just stayed away from me for about a week. And then it was fine. We talked about it. It was fine. But he was really, really upset for a while.”

- Columbine, A True Crime Story.

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OK SO A COUPLE MONTHS AGO I DREW THESE PORTRAITS OF ERIC HARRIS AND DYLAN KLEBOLD, AND TODAY WE HAD THIS FAMILY PARTY AND EVERYONE WANTED TO SEE MY DRAWINGS SO I WAS LIKE OK CANT BE THAT BAD, AND MY GRANDMOTHER SAW THESE TWO AND WAS LIKE “wow these would look so nice on my wALL” AND SHE ASKED ME “cAN I HAVE THESE AND PUT THEM ON MY WALL?” AND WTF WAS I SUPPOSED TO SAY SO STUPID ME SAID “YEA OFC” AND NOW MY GRANDMOTHER HAS TWO DRAWINGS OF DYLAN AND ERIC ON HER WALL

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Dylan was intimidated by girls. He did the sound board for theater, where he liked being around other “weirdos,” but in general did not know how to interact with other people. He liked learning, but not school. He had girl friends, but never a girlfriend. (Tom Klebold says Dylan would go out with a group of friends; what Tom called “group dating.”)

It wasn’t a romantic relationship but in the summer of 1997 Dylan met Devon Adams through friends she had at BlackJack. Devon, two years younger, would be entering Columbine as a freshman. By the time school started Devon was friendly enough with Eric and Dylan to have breakfast and lunch with them. Dylan was not a morning person, and would sleep until noon or 1:00 p.m. on the weekends if he could. For breakfast he would eat donuts and orange juice, or soda pop. Sitting in the middle of the cafeteria, Eric and Dylan would do class work. Or at least pretend to. They could quote every line from the movie Natural Born Killers and Dylan, usually dressed in jeans and a T-shirt, preferred to talk. Devon also says she was marked for speaking with Dylan: A jock would say, “Why are you talking to that faggot? Are you a dyke?“ 


Devon never saw the violence when Dylan was alive. When they whacked each other with foam noodles in the pool, it was all fun and games. Other guys tackled her when they played football, but not Dylan. And when she cut her leg on the field, Dylan flipped out. He called a time out and washed her leg off. He didn’t like dogs and was scared of Devon’s Siberian Husky, but dealt with the animal, again, out of respect for her. "He didn’t want to disrupt anything, you know?” Devon says. “He was always very respectful of everything.”
  

Devon did see flashes of anger in Dylan. It might be a “dumb” occasion like getting a bad test grade. Or a spat over something inconsequential. At first, Dylan suppressed the anger. “I remember one time when he and I got in a fight cause I said something I shouldn’t have to him; I was just really, really angry at him, I don’t remember why, I was just mad at him, and he just walked away, and I don’t know if he ever got really mad about it. But he just walked away, and he just stayed away from me for about a week. And then it was fine. We talked about it. It was fine. But he was really, really upset for a while.”


A passage from

Columbine: A True Crime Story, Jeff Kass. (2009).

3

Harris sticks his head under a table and points a gun, maybe the carbine rifle, at John Savage. Savage scoots away. Harris points the gun again. Savage scoots. Harris stands up. 
“Who is under the table?” Harris asks. “Identify yourself." 
"It’s me, John,” says Savage, who knows Harris and Klebold from classes, but considers them more acquaintances than friends. 
“John Savage?” Klebold says. 
“Yes,” Savage replies. 
“Hi,” Klebold says. 
“Hi Dylan,” says Savage. “What are you doing?" 
"Oh, just killing people,” Klebold says, shrugging. 
“Are you going to kill me?” Savage asks. 
Klebold looks at him a second. “No dude, just run,” he says. “Just get out of here." 
He runs outside, sprinting at top speed. 

- About the conversation between Dylan and John during the massacre in Columbine, A True Crime Story by Jeff Kass. 

Caius Veiovis

Caius Veiovis (pictured above) is a 37-year-old, man from Augusta, Maine who in 2011 was charged with the killings of three men: David Glasser. Edward Frampton and Robert Chadwell. Their dismembered corpses were found in Becket. He was convicted alongside Adam Lee Hall from Peru and David Chalue of North Adams. They kidnapped Glasser and his two friends, stabbed and decapitated them. Veiovis, Hall and Chalue are all being charged with three accounts of murder, kidnapping and witness intimidation. All three pleaded ‘not guilty.’

Above: Adam Lee Hall

Below: David Chalue

Apparently, the motive for the murders was to prevent David Glasser from testifying against Hall, a ranking member of the Hells Angels, in an upcoming trial for kidnapping, assault, battery and witness intimidation among other charges. Frampton and Chadwell were reportedly killed because they witnessed Glasser’s kidnapping.

This wasn’t the first time Veiovis has had a run-in with the police. When he was 19, he and his then girlfriend attacked another teen. They sliced at his back with a razor blade and drank the blood from his wounds. The teenager ended up with a 7-inch gash that needed more than 30 stitches. During the trial, Veiovis claimed he was a Satan worshiper and a “vampire with a thirst for blood.” Both he and his girlfriend were convicted of elevated aggravated assault and reckless conduct.

Veiovis served seven and a half years of his original ten-year sentence for the attack and while imprisoned he changed his name legally from Roy to Caius Veiovis. Veiovis, taken from the name of the Roman god of the same name who sacrificed goats and protected criminals and the violently insane.

In 2006, Veiovis was charged for drug possession and kidnapping after he and another man allegedly held two strippers in a hotel room. The kidnapping charges were dropped but he was sent back to prison. The exact date he was released from prison again is unknown.

Above: Veiovis in court

All three received three life sentences in 2014 for their crimes with no possibility of parole. Upon receiving this sentence Veiovis stood up in court exclaimed “I’ll see you all in hell, remember that, every fucking one of you. I’ll see you all in hell.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtfSfWF3gk8  (Video of Veiovis’ outburst in court)

In 2017, a supreme judicial court has denied an appeal for a new trial as the defended (Veiovis) is not entitled to relief under the law.

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Dylan Klebold, one month after the van break-in, scratched something into another student’s locker. For this, he was detained and then suspended. The dean - Peter Hovarth - later talked to investigators about Dylan and stated:
  "Talking to Dylan was like talking to a very intellectual person. He wasn’t a stupid kid. He’s not a thug kid that’s getting suspended. He’s a smart, intelligent kid. I just remember the conversation being at a level; that would you know, you’d sit there and you’d think, ‘Wow, this is a pretty high level conversation for a kid like this.’ You could just tell his feelings around, I’m not going to use the word politics again but again, he was too intelligent sometimes I felt for his age. You know, he knew too much about certain things and he spoke too eloquently about knowing the law and why he was being suspended and knowing, just you know, speaking about how society is this way towards people.”“

- Columbine: A True Crime Story by Jeff Kass.

“Dylan wasn’t so much into lyrics. When it came to techno, says Devon, "Like, the more bass he could get in that music, like subwoofers and stuff, the better. He really liked that. A lot of it is mostly instrumental, which he liked a lot. He didn’t have to deal with all the lyrics and stuff. He wanted to make up his own mind what the music was about. He did not like to be told what to be feeling. He was an individual. He always strove to be an individual. He didn’t always succeed. You can just lose yourself in techno music. I remember nights staying up with him and he just drifted off. Music shuts off the outside world." 

- Columbine: A True Crime Story by Jeff Kass.

anonymous asked:

Is it true that eric punched a hole into his bedroom wall ?

Diversion File Intake Questions:

[EH Diversion p. 3] he reported letting his anger build up and punching walls

[EH Diversion p. 24] EH reported he had a “short temper; often get angry at almost anything I don’t like”

[EH Diversion p. 39] punched walls four times a month 

Eric began taking Zoloft for depression about 6 weeks ago [Feb. 21 1998]. He said that he is feeling better now that he is on medication. Eric said that he has problems with anxiety and allows his anger to build up until he explodes. Eric says when he gets really mad he punches walls. He is seeing a therapist once or twice a month. The family also meets with him on occasion. Eric said that he has thought about suicide a couple of times, but never seriously, mostly out of anger.

Parents version:
[EH Diversion p. 17] parents noted outbursts including punching things (at work and school, but not at home) 

Problems Your Child Had or Is Currently Having: Anger, Depression, Suicidal Thoughts • After this incident occurred, Eric expressed his feelings concerning the above items to a psychologist. The doctor recommended antidepressant medication which seems to have helped. His mood is more upbeat. Eric seems to suppress his anger, then “blow up” and hit something or verbally lash out. He hasn’t done this at home but has done it at school and work.


Eric punched walls very often when he was angry. He was taken to the hospital freshman year for punching a brick wall and thought he broke his hand. So, it is unknown of how long he had been punching walls in a way to express his anger, but it had been at least four years.

As a military recruiter, he had access to a list of local high school students. That’s how he called Eric Harris on Friday, April 2, 1999, eighteen days before
Columbine. They had a twenty-minute phone interview as Gonzales did a
pre-screening. He asked about medical background, divorce, mental
health, counseling, prescription drug use, along with height, weight, and
any use of glasses. Eric said he had had a broken nose and broken wrist
when he was younger;
Gonzales didn’t recall how they happened.

Source: Columbine: A True Crimes Story - by Jeff Kass


 “Talking to Dylan was like talking to a very intellectual person. He wasn’t a stupid kid. He’s not a thug kid that’s getting suspended. He’s a smart, intelligent kid. I just remember the conversation being at a level; that would you know, you’d sit there and you’d think, ‘Wow, this is a pretty high level conversation for a kid like this.’ You could just tell his feelings around, I’m going to use the politics again but again, he was too intelligent sometimes I felt for his age. You know, he knew too much about certain things and he spoke too eloquently about knowing the law and why he was being suspended and knowing, just you know, speaking about how society is this way towards people.”  

-Peter Horvath, Dean, Columbine HS

“How he knew the law” - Diversion Program, yes/yes? ;)

[Eric’s] parents went upstairs, and Eric asked if Susan [DeWitt] wanted to listen to music. They went into his bedroom, downstairs in the basement.

It was just about Eric’s last chance to get some before Columbine.

Susan recalled a poster of the blond, one-time MTV host Jenny McCarthy, and other band posters. Ticket stubs from concerts and movies were stapled around the window. Eric had CDs he had made on his computer, and soccer jerseys hanging up.

They listened to soft tunes, although Eric favored more head-banging stuff. Susan didn’t notice anything suspicious. […] She stuck around for about thirty more minutes and at one point, Eric put his arm around her. When she left, he kissed her on the cheek as a way of saying goodbye.

—  Columbine: A True Crime Story by Jeff Kass
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After the gun show they (Robyn & Dylan) dropped off Eric at his house. Eric put his two guns and other merchandise in the trunk of his car. 
  “Well folks, today was a very important day,” he wrote in his diary. 
  “We have GUNS! We fucking got em you sons of bitches! HA!! HA HA HA! Neener! Booga Booga. heh it’s all over now." 
  Eric inserted a small drawing of a man sticking out his tongue, putting his trumbs in his ears, and waving his fingers to tease. 
  "This capped it off, the point of no return." 
  Despite his joy, Eric still had an empty heart. "it’s really a shame,” he wrote. “I had a lot of fun at that gun show, I would have loved it if you were there dad. we would have done some major bonding. would have been great.”
  But he quickly snapped: “If (I) have to cheat and lie to everyone then that’s fine. THIS is what I am motivated for. THIS is my goal, THIS is what I want ’to do with my life.’" 
  Dylan went with Robyn to her house. She got in her car, and followed Dylan to his house. They were going to study calculus. Dylan drove his car into the garage, put the shotgun under his jacket, and with his other purchases in a bag, went up to his room.

- Columbine: A True Crime Story by Jeff Kass.

Something to remember us by..

Attorney, DeCamp asked about Eric and Dylan’s love of video games, namely Doom. Kriegshauser said the game came up when he mentioned he was looking for “fun things to do” on his computer, and Eric and Dylan gave him a “Doom Bible.” Kriegshauser said he kept it for a bit, then gave it back because it was inappropriate for him to accept gifts.

Kriegshauser “terminated” Eric and Dylan from diversion early on February 3, 1999. On the last day he met with them, he might have learned their nicknames, Vodka and Rebel. “I have a bulletin board in my office,” he said in his deposition. “And when I was out getting their paperwork, they individually took my—one of those plastic pin things you stick up on a thing, and they put out a V and an R.  And I said, ‘W hat’s that? Well, it’s just something to remember us by. Really? What does it mean?’ And I recall them saying, ‘Virtual Reality.’ But they might have said Vodka and Rebel. Now, I don’t know. But that’s the only time I ever knew about it.”

Source: Columbine: A True Crime Story - By Jeff Kass