colour shifting

I did not want to think about people. I wanted the trees, the scents and colours, the shifting shadows of the wood, which spoke a language I understood. I wished I could simply disappear in it, live like a bird or a fox through the winter, and leave the things I had glimpsed to resolve themselves without me.
I did not want to think about people. I wanted the trees, the scents and colours, the shifting shadows of the wood, which spoke a language I understood. I wished I could simply disappear in it, live like a bird or a fox through the winter, and leave the things I had glimpsed to resolve themselves without me.
—  Patricia A. McKillip
10

John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836–1893, England)

Marine scenes

Grimshaw was an English Victorian-era artist, popular both during his time and in the present for his night-time depictions of British cities.

Grimshaw’s earliest influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he created landscapes of accurate colour and lighting, vivid detail and realism, often typifying seasons or a type of weather. Moonlit views of city and suburban streets and of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. The focus on atmosphere, and lack of moral message or historical reference allies his work to some extent with the Aesthetic Movement.

His careful painting and his skill in lighting effects meant that he captured both the appearance and the mood of a scene in minute detail. His “paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene.” Later in life his colour palette shifted from dark blues to golden yellows, and towards the end of his life were hints of a change in artistic direction, with looser brushwork influenced by his friend James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who was quoted saying “I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.”

10

John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836–1893, England)

Golden scenes

Grimshaw was an English Victorian-era artist, popular both during his time and in the present for his night-time depictions of British cities.

Grimshaw’s earliest influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he created landscapes of accurate colour and lighting, vivid detail and realism, often typifying seasons or a type of weather. Moonlit views of city and suburban streets and of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. The focus on atmosphere, and lack of moral message or historical reference allies his work to some extent with the Aesthetic Movement.

His careful painting and his skill in lighting effects meant that he captured both the appearance and the mood of a scene in minute detail. His “paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene.” Later in life his colour palette shifted from dark blues to golden yellows, and towards the end of his life were hints of a change in artistic direction, with looser brushwork influenced by his friend James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who was quoted saying “I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.”

Yoongi ‘One-shot’

Summary: Life with Yoongi

Inspired by: Daughter - Medicine

Originally posted by btsfunboyz

‘I love you.’

He’d been your best friend since you were both 4 years old at the nursery school. With all the other children playing with toys and climbing in the sandpit, the two of you had been sat on either side of a rickety wooden children’s bench, each with a book that neither of you could read yet, but simply enjoying the vibrant pictures of animals and smiles.

One of the other children had snatched your book away from you and ran off with it, leaving you to frown and try not to cry despite how much your lip wobbled, but you’d been saved from the tantrum by a little black haired boy, whose hair had shone like fire in the sunlight despite its dark colour, and who had shifted over to sit beside you, his little chubby hand spreading his own book across your lap and his own, before it had hooked around your shoulder to get you to read it with him, his goofy grin making you smile at him before you’d looked at the pictures he was so excited to show you.

And it had been the same ever since.

When you’d both gotten to the age of 14 and had spent the past 10 years showing each other everything that excited you both, sharing your entire childhood together in a blur of excitement and smiles and fun, you’d been separated by schools, with the only way to see one another being the local music club where you’d learnt the violin and he’d learnt the piano. You’d played in concerts together, the musical flow the two of you had stemming from how closely your minds were linked- how similar you were. But it was always obvious that Yoongi had been better than you, he was just so invested in the music that you could see the obsession and adoration for each note in his eyes when he played or simply spoke about composing and creating music.

He’d always been that passionate about everything.

And even though you grew out of it, he continued on…even getting to the stage where he was recruited into a music company in the city, where he ended up joining an idol group and travelling the world with them.

You’d thought he would leave you behind, but he never did. Offering for you to join him in the city; suggesting that the two of you get an apartment together because you were such good friends, and despite your worries about it being awkward you’d agreed, because the excitement that was in his eyes almost matched the way he looked at music- although there was the slightest hint of something else that you could never work out.

For the first few months you’d hardly see him since his schedule was so hectic and crowded that he often didn’t come home till early in the morning, before leaving again before 9am. However, he’d always make sure to spend at least one night a week with you, the two of you chatting all night long, or watching a movie, or going out to explore the city; it didn’t matter what you did, because you were together.

Keep reading

I thought I would draw my own version of Darkiplier! So here he is! *with Mark so you can see some of the differences!
 
- Dark’s hair is free flowing! Its like slime or dense mist! Its colour’s shift and change from all shades of red sometimes shifting to black in some parts! (kinda like MLP’s Luna and Celestia and how their manes work?)

ENJOY 💖

9

The Social Network

DOP - Jeff Cronenweth
Format - RED One 4.5K R3DRAW 
Lenses - Zeiss Master Prime and Angenieux Optimo Lenses 
Aspect Ratio - 2.35 : 1 
Delivery - 35mm, Digital Intermediate 2K

Notable Strengths - Symmetry, Balanced Compositions, Strong Lines, Level Frames, Colour, Tilt Shift Sequences, Effortless Camera Placement Dolly and Tracking Camera Movement

4

Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons. “Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores.”

6

Revenge of the Sith | Behind the Seams | The Peacock Gown

As the ensuing Clone Wars threaten the Republic in the opening of Episode III, Padmé is seen wearing the somber colors of mourning. Constrained by her hidden marriage, her costumes now adopt a Victorian silhouette. She is shrouded in petticoats and crinolines - fashions adopted to conceal her pregnancy - but the design also heralds the oppresion of the dark times on Coruscant, the coming of the Empire. All the costumes in which she is seen in public hang from the shoulders and are supported on what is essentially a simplified crinoline shape unerneath. Using steel rings in the petticoats and quilted petticoats to keep stiffness underneath allowed Trisha Biggar to use soft fabrics on the top, so there would still be a very soft, feminine feel to Padmé’s costumes.

The Peacock Gown consists of a glossy, high-collared underdress woven from a tightly pleated material which Biggar called “peacock fabric” because of the way it shifted colours according to different lighting conditions and Natalie Portman’s movement. In different lights, it looks both blue and rusty brown. The puff sleeves are drawn at the lower arm and have beads dangling from the cuff. Over this dress Padmé wears a long, brown, layered coat that is somewhat triangular from the front and has a cape that goes over her arms. Small tassels hung off each ending of the coat, which is decorated in its entirety in scrollwork done in ribbon.

Padmé’s headdress is an unique design, shaped like a rectangle with an in-facing scalloped front. The sides are done in a decorative yet simple style in a grayish metal with Padmé’s hair done in myriad tight ringlets resembling strings of beads. In order to create the thin, tight ringlets of the hairstyle which was heavily influenced by Ancient Egyptian female fashion, the hairdressing department had to carefully match swatches of real Russian hair to the actress’s hair color. The matches needed to be made under sunlight, as fluorescent lights don’t accurately reflect true color. What’s more, different colors of hair were mixed together to create realistic ringlets that looked natural. For the headpiece itself, Trisha Biggar had a pin she liked reproduced a dozen times. The reproductions were placed on hand-bent piano wire, then plated, and finally lined with leather.