colour shifted

promptis; a quiet corner, a little escape.

Prompto’s the one that finds him, sitting on the roof of some apartment complex, several blocks away from his own building. Noctis doesn’t bother looking up as his friend settles on the edge next to him.

“Hey, buddy,” Prompto says. His tone is no different from usual, only a little quieter. His boots swing back and forth off the side of the building. “Enjoying the view?”

Noctis shrugs. He keeps his gaze ahead of him on the sun slowly sinking behind the Wall. It’s a beautiful sight, the colours shifting from orange to pink like a dream. He’s half-surprised Prompto doesn’t have his camera out, blabbing about the wonderful opportunity this sunset is for his photographer’s eye. Mostly Noctis just wants the day to end so maybe this tightness in his chest will go away.

“Noct,” Prompto says. His boots have stopped swinging, and his fingers are playing with the bracelets around his wrist. “Are you… okay? I mean, you don’t have to tell me anything if you don’t want to, but you kind of just… upped and left class today, and Iggy and the rest of the ‘guard are still looking for you, and like, I get you need your space but I don’t know, I just… You know I’m always here for you, right? If you want to talk? Ah, I’m talking too much right now, aren’t I, uh, I’ll—I’ll shut up now.”

Noctis finally glances over. His friend has his hands in his lap, head bowed slightly, embarrassment colouring his cheeks. In the fading sunlight, Prompto looks even softer than he does usually. Noctis sighs. “It’s okay, Prompt,” he says, “I just… needed to get away, is all.”

“Oh. From school? Yeah, I get that a lot. Especially with exam season coming up and all.”

“Yeah. And also, I guess, the whole Prince thing. Even Gladio’s been on my back about it, but it’s not like. There’s nothing I can do about it. My dad’s no help either. I’m just.” Noctis blows his bangs from his face. “Tired.”

Prompto offers a smile. “Being royalty isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, huh.”

“No,” Noctis agrees, allowing his own lips to pull up, too. “Zero out of ten recommended.”

His friend laughs, and the familiar sound eases some of the tension from Noctis’ chest. They fall into silence again, comfortable this time, only the distant sound of traffic below between them. The sun’s almost gone now, and Noctis can’t help but feel like it’s much too soon. Everything’s too soon, and yet not fast enough.

“Hey, Noct,” Prompto says eventually. “You mind if I text Iggy back that you’re not dead in a ditch somewhere? I’m afraid my phone might explode from his voicemails.”

“Sure.”

“Cool. You want to go home? Or we can go to that fast food restaurant you like.”

Noctis hesitates. “Can you… Can we—stay? For a bit longer.”

“Okay,” Prompto says without missing a beat. “All the time you need, Noct.”

As the sun fades from behind Insomnia’s Wall, Noct leans his head against his best friend’s shoulder, and breathes.

I did not want to think about people. I wanted the trees, the scents and colours, the shifting shadows of the wood, which spoke a language I understood. I wished I could simply disappear in it, live like a bird or a fox through the winter, and leave the things I had glimpsed to resolve themselves without me.
I did not want to think about people. I wanted the trees, the scents and colours, the shifting shadows of the wood, which spoke a language I understood. I wished I could simply disappear in it, live like a bird or a fox through the winter, and leave the things I had glimpsed to resolve themselves without me.
—  Patricia A. McKillip
Sick Day

Request: “Can I please request some fluff where reader takes care of Credence when he is sick? He deserves so much love xx”

Pairing: Credence Barebone x Reader

Word Count: 744 (a short lil thing sorry)

Warnings: mentions of self-harm

A/n: i know this is short n shitty but I just needed to get back into the swing of writing bc I’ve been so overcome by uni work :’(


There was a lake. It was brilliant, and seemed to reflect the shifting colours of the rainbow as the sun hit the still water. You were reaching for it, and your fingers had almost skimmed across the water until you were ripped into a fleeting world of darkness to the sound of something loud. Your eyes fluttered open with a groan, and you rubbed the sleep out of them as you rose in your bed. You squinted against the drawn curtains, your arms naturally sliding across to your right. You sat up when you realized the sheets were bare.

“Credence?” You called groggily. The only reply you got was the flushing of the toilet. You hopped up, entering the scene with caution as the door was left wide open. You found your boyfriend kneeling over the toilet, his head hung weakly over the bowl.

“I’m in here.” He spoke quietly, his words muffled by the white porcelain. Your heart ached at the sight of his pale, shivering face as he lifted it to greet you.

“Oh you poor thing.” You cooed, sitting down beside him. “Are you sick?”

Credence nodded, wiping his mouth on his sleeve.

Keep reading

10

John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836–1893, England)

Marine scenes

Grimshaw was an English Victorian-era artist, popular both during his time and in the present for his night-time depictions of British cities.

Grimshaw’s earliest influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he created landscapes of accurate colour and lighting, vivid detail and realism, often typifying seasons or a type of weather. Moonlit views of city and suburban streets and of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. The focus on atmosphere, and lack of moral message or historical reference allies his work to some extent with the Aesthetic Movement.

His careful painting and his skill in lighting effects meant that he captured both the appearance and the mood of a scene in minute detail. His “paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene.” Later in life his colour palette shifted from dark blues to golden yellows, and towards the end of his life were hints of a change in artistic direction, with looser brushwork influenced by his friend James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who was quoted saying “I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.”

In Response to the Scepticism Regarding Thor Ragnarok’s Use of Comedy-

I hate using the word “comedy” for a start. So basically, it’s been revealed slowly as time goes by that Thor Ragnarok will be the ‘funniest Thor film yet’. Of course, just like every other time something is changed slightly, people become sceptical. Don’t get me wrong, I can see why, seeing as though people’s initial assumptions of Ragnarok were focused on it having dark tones. Since the film was announced we’ve seen a shift in colour and logo, but what’s the problem exactly? Is Ragnarok too serious to be funny? No, and here’s why y'all should chill.

Firstly, the Director, Taika Watiti is the master of heartful charm and humour. His films always have perfect beats of humour with important underline messages weaved throughout. There’s plenty of apocalyptic type films that go for a lighthearted feel rather than dark and gritty. For example, Zombieland - it’s full of comedy but you’re on an engaging and heartfelt journey with the characters. There’s a difference between goofy slapstick comedy and the kind of comedy we’re going to get in Thor Ragnarok so everyone remain seated and clam down.

You can say that “Ragnarok” should be serious and dark, but no one has a problem with Guardians of the Galaxy being a Space Opera. You think the comics were full of silly humour every 5 mins? Gotg could have been super serious, but James Gunn opted for a fun, lighthearted journey, just like Taika Watiti is with Thor Ragnarok, and believe me, he’s the man for the job. Watch his films: Hunt for the Wilderpeople, and What We Do in the Shadows - two great examples. I’m totally on board, and if Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2 wasn’t coming out this year then Ragnarok would be the film I’m most exited for. Plus, if the Goddess of Death is part of this film then you can still expect some dark and potentially horrific themes.

etsy.com
Autumn Leaves Lizard Wing Asymmetric Shawl Handmade in Iceland
When I saw the pattern for these I fell in love and Ill be making a few of them, and if you all like them, a lot of them. They remind me of a dragons wing gently folded around the shoulders of the wearer.

This particular one is worked with a mixed fibre yarn consisting of 75% wool with 25% polyamid for added strength.
The softly shifting colours, from a bright orange through a range of reds and browns, even purple hues, is reminiscent of the shifting colours of the autumn leaves.

The long/top edge is 214 cm or 84 inches long, which would be more than enough to comfortably wrap around most shoulders.

Care Instructions:
Wash gently by hand Only.
Use a mild soap.
Because of the mixed fiber, do not use any form of fabric softener.
Dry flat.

dandelion eyes

i’m only human
and i’m afraid
that i may fall
for dandelion grey

i’m only human
and they’ve seen
that i’m falling
for dandelion green

i’m only human
and it’s true
that i’m falling
for dandelion blue

i’m only human
and tell myself lies
because i’ve fallen
for dandelion eyes

10

John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836–1893, England)

Golden scenes

Grimshaw was an English Victorian-era artist, popular both during his time and in the present for his night-time depictions of British cities.

Grimshaw’s earliest influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he created landscapes of accurate colour and lighting, vivid detail and realism, often typifying seasons or a type of weather. Moonlit views of city and suburban streets and of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. The focus on atmosphere, and lack of moral message or historical reference allies his work to some extent with the Aesthetic Movement.

His careful painting and his skill in lighting effects meant that he captured both the appearance and the mood of a scene in minute detail. His “paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene.” Later in life his colour palette shifted from dark blues to golden yellows, and towards the end of his life were hints of a change in artistic direction, with looser brushwork influenced by his friend James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who was quoted saying “I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.”

6

Revenge of the Sith | Behind the Seams | The Peacock Gown

As the ensuing Clone Wars threaten the Republic in the opening of Episode III, Padmé is seen wearing the somber colors of mourning. Constrained by her hidden marriage, her costumes now adopt a Victorian silhouette. She is shrouded in petticoats and crinolines - fashions adopted to conceal her pregnancy - but the design also heralds the oppresion of the dark times on Coruscant, the coming of the Empire. All the costumes in which she is seen in public hang from the shoulders and are supported on what is essentially a simplified crinoline shape unerneath. Using steel rings in the petticoats and quilted petticoats to keep stiffness underneath allowed Trisha Biggar to use soft fabrics on the top, so there would still be a very soft, feminine feel to Padmé’s costumes.

The Peacock Gown consists of a glossy, high-collared underdress woven from a tightly pleated material which Biggar called “peacock fabric” because of the way it shifted colours according to different lighting conditions and Natalie Portman’s movement. In different lights, it looks both blue and rusty brown. The puff sleeves are drawn at the lower arm and have beads dangling from the cuff. Over this dress Padmé wears a long, brown, layered coat that is somewhat triangular from the front and has a cape that goes over her arms. Small tassels hung off each ending of the coat, which is decorated in its entirety in scrollwork done in ribbon.

Padmé’s headdress is an unique design, shaped like a rectangle with an in-facing scalloped front. The sides are done in a decorative yet simple style in a grayish metal with Padmé’s hair done in myriad tight ringlets resembling strings of beads. In order to create the thin, tight ringlets of the hairstyle which was heavily influenced by Ancient Egyptian female fashion, the hairdressing department had to carefully match swatches of real Russian hair to the actress’s hair color. The matches needed to be made under sunlight, as fluorescent lights don’t accurately reflect true color. What’s more, different colors of hair were mixed together to create realistic ringlets that looked natural. For the headpiece itself, Trisha Biggar had a pin she liked reproduced a dozen times. The reproductions were placed on hand-bent piano wire, then plated, and finally lined with leather.

White floor black bookshelves wind outside like a wash load running wind visiting like an known unknown cousin wind speaking like a sheet thrown open.

Quiet in my body I glance in I glance out out glances at me touches my chin. Seconds sprinkled onto minutes spread over Wednesday scattering into evening.

A thread of celebration pulled quietly festive bright through the across from you across from me shelf table book breakfast wind flowers hands shoulders afternoon.

In the wavering pliant varying unfixed several anchors stand up, poke up solid as through fields of grass waving in the wind. Are they blue are they grey are they violet colour shifts. Come closer and they are like runes with quiet joy eyes. And this texture and this texture. And this bendable concrete.

Fixed point no, relative yes, syntax yes no, quantum yes no, electrons in motion no, electrons at rest no.