colorful straws

Reason // Jeon Jungkook

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the prompt: could I have a jungkook scenario where him and her are best friends and she’s always pointing at girls like “what about her she’s cute” or when a waitress flirts with him she’s like “hey go for it she’s into you” and jungkook is just not interested and shoves it off and he doesn’t really know why he just doesn’t find any of her suggestions attractive until one day when they’re walking in the park or wherever and she trips and lands on her face or eating something and it spills down her shirt and she’s not fazed about it at all and he’s just sweetly laughing at her clumsiness and that’s when he realizes that the reason he never thought those girls fit his standards was because they weren’t her.

words: 1616

category: fluff

author note: every time i write abt kookie i think of him as a boyfriend which is funny bc im not rlly romantically attracted to jungkook?? enjoy!

- destinee

Originally posted by hohbi


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Blink while driving on Highway 34, east of Greeley, Colo., and you might miss the former town of Dearfield.

All that’s left of the once-thriving town on Colorado’s eastern plains are a rundown gas station, a partially collapsed lunch counter and a former lodge. They are the only indication that there was once a community here. The grass around these buildings is crispy and straw-colored, whipped back and forth by relentless winds. The snowcapped Rocky Mountains barely peek through the haze to the west.

Abandoned towns from the early 20th century are far from unique on this stretch of the Great Plains. Withered storefronts and collapsed homes are common. Boom and bust economics and harsh weather made it tough for turn of the century settlers to succeed long-term.

Few ghost towns, however, have all the elements that make Dearfield’s story so compelling: larger than life characters, struggles to live off the land, tales of racial integration at the height of the Jim Crow era.

A Forgotten Piece Of African-American History On The Great Plains

Photos: Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

One Piece: the Straw Hats' eye colours

As you should know, Eiichiro Oda draws his characters with small, black dot eyes, except for most of the women (whose irises are clearly visible, particularly since the post-timeskip art evolution). Although, in certain scenes – especially when the characters are serious, determined, or emotional, and sometimes just because it’s a close up – the men’s irises can be seen and are thus coloured in Eiichiro Oda’s artwork. After some intense study I’ve been able to figure out the eye colours of most (but not all) of the Straw Hats, listed below. This may be of help to fan artists, colourists and fanfic writers who wish to stay as true to canon as possible. I’ll mostly stay out of using the anime or movies for reference, since the manga is a higher source of canon (in my book anyway). I may update this post in the future if I get new information on the subject, and feel free to tell me if you know something I don’t! I’ll be able to provide sources for each picture so that you can see better for yourself if there is demand for it. (Just message me if you’re interested!)

Also: If you think this is totally boring and stupid, just ignore it!

Luffy

As the main character, Luffy is the one most often depicted in artwork, and frequently at the center. For these reasons, finding out his eye colour should be easy, but it was frustratingly difficult.

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Reasons Herbs May Not Work

It breaks my heart when I see people give up on herbs too easily.

More and more people are turning to herbs because there is a growing disappointment with using pharmaceuticals for chronic illness.

Many people are getting fed up with taking a pill that never really cures their illness and gives them awful side effects. Maybe they are concerned about acetaminophen giving their young child asthma (1) or they see the growing evidence about the risks associated with statins (2) and they say enough is enough!

From this moment forward they vow to never resort to drugs again and instead try a more natural and holistic approach thus leading them to the world of herbs and herbalism.

But sometimes their love affair with herbalism is stopped short.

They reach for the closest herb book, try a few remedies and then declare that the herbs don’t work! They tried using horehound for coughing with no relief. They tried meadowsweet for their headache to no avail.

They begin to wonder, “Are herbalists a bunch of delusional wood fairies touting the miracles of something that never works?”

As much as I would love to be considered a wood fairy, I’ll have to say no, this is not the case. I’ve seen herbs work hundreds of times. I’ve seen them work for serious infections as well as serious chronic diseases. I’ve seen them work when modern medicine failed.

Yes, herbs work!

I want to share a handful of reasons why herbs might not work in a given situation.

1. Improper dosing (either too little or too much)

When buying over the counter drugs like NyQuil or Tylenol, they come in a package that is clearly marked with the dosage instructions. Generally these are very simple instructions. “Adults take 2 tablets, three times daily.”

Herbs don’t always come with directions. If you buy bulk herbs the dosing instructions are absent entirely. If you buy a tincture or a bottle of capsules the dosage listed on the bottle has most likely been chosen by the FDA’s labeling mandates and not by an herbalist.  

I am not going to lie to you. Dosage in the herbal world is confusing.

In herbalism dosage varies from person to person, from plant to plant and from preparation to preparation.

A 15 minute infusion of a teaspoon of nettle leaf will not extract the same vitamins and minerals as a four-hour infusion of an ounce of nettle leaf in a quart of water.

A few drops of lobelia tincture can promote relaxation. A strong cup of lobelia tea could make you vomit.

One way I commonly see dosages being flubbed in herbalism is people using small amounts of tonic/adaptogen herbs in tincture, versus the traditional use of large amount of tonic/adaptogen herbs as decoctions or powders. (As always go with what works, but if you aren’t getting the results you’d expect after taking 5 drops of ashwanganda tincture twice a day, consider your dose!)

Frequency of dosing can also be an issue. During acute illnesses we generally use slightly smaller amounts but with more frequency. I may take elderberry elixir 1-2 times each hour at the onset of an illness for example. General recommendations are to take herbs 3 times a day, but that won’t cut it for acute illness.

2. Low quality plant material

Herbs often don’t come with an expiration date. Quality can also vary significantly and will suffer greatly if the herbs have been improperly harvested or improperly processed.

Plants decay. They simply go bad. The rate at which they do this varies significantly from plant to plant. If you’ve just pulled a bag of herbs from your back shelf and had to blow off an inch of dust… well, they are probably not at their prime.

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