colored rims

Keep waking me up at 5:30am?

Second attempt. First time it got eaten.

I lived in a very ghetto apartment complex for a while. While there I was working grave yard shift, and there was a car that would come at 5:30am on week days to pick up SOMEONE and they would lay on the horn for at least 20 minutes. They would never get out of the car, they would just lay on the damned horn.

I did ask them politely, once, to stop, to go knock, I work grave yard and would like to sleep. I basically got told to fuck off. Ok, you’ve asked for it.

He was driving a VERY pimped out Cadillac. Maroon in color, tinted windows, gold rims, large white wall tires, etc. Obv very proud of his ride. I waited a month, so it wouldn’t be obvious it was me, then I borrowed a paint ball gun from a guy at work. I took the screen off my window facing where he always parks, and waited for the next morning.

When he started laying on his horn I sprayed his car with neon orange paint. He stopped laying on his horn after that. I think I made my point.

nuclearmentality  asked:

I know you can't tell us if/when Infinity Train gets greenlit (I, for one, am hoping it does!), but I wanted to know how hard it was, overall, to make the pilot, and whether you think you'd be capable of running a full show.

It’s hard to say how difficult it was. Kinda difficult? It was the exact amount of work I expected it to be. I feel like “hard” or “easy” is sort of a relative term that often shows that something was more or less work than expected rather than objective difficulty. I planned things out as much as I could and tried to be easy to work with. I tried have a looser hand in some areas and stronger in others. Part of running a show is being able to give up certain aspects of the art of making a show to other people. So while I was allowed to do as much as I wanted, I intentionally tried to limit myself so I could practice.

Like for example, I was interested in doing the music, but I also knew that if I got my own show I wouldn’t be able to do that as it’s too much extra work. So I got Chrome Canyon, who I trust a ton, and sort of used this as practice in learning how to talk about music with someone. Talking about music can be difficult and it’s not something I have a lot of experience in, even though I make a lot of music myself.

The shorts crew is also very experienced, so even though I’m told my process went pretty smoothly, whenever I DID hit a bump they all knew what to do and had my back the whole time. They were super supportive. The shorts program is sort of there to help you learn about all the bits and pieces that go into a show and see how you handle them.

So for another example, something new I hadn’t done before is attend a breakdown of my episode. Breakdowns are where the art director and the production team sit and figure out every asset that needs to be made for an episode. This means they end up paging through the entire storyboard, panel by panel, and find every:

- new background

- new prop (anything a character interacts with like if they pick up a spoon or adjust a rear view mirror etc)

- new special effect (like a glint on a sword or an explosion)

- special poses (if a character makes a really weird reaction face someone has to design it)

- special colors (if a character changes to a different scene they might need new colors or rim light designs).

- every reused background/character/prop

- Just in general go over design notes

I’ve had experience doing all aspects of production in my own work, and as a storyboarder on Regular Show JG had occasionally allowed me to take part in different aspects of production, but I had never seen a breakdown before. Now that I have, on my own board no less, I very much feel it should be a requirement for every storyboarder to attend one breakdown meeting in their career. Seeing other people try to decipher your work is very illuminating and instantly made me change the way I boarded and labeled things so I could be more clear in order to make their jobs easier. Like they always told me “add this background” or “label stuff” but you don’t really KNOW know until you see exactly what they’re looking at and swearing about in the room.

I absolutely think I’m capable of running a full show. It would be a learning curve, but so is any new job. Just about everything that I can think of that a show runner does is stuff that I really want to do. It sounds like a lot of fun and I’d love to give it a go.

10

VW T5 Caravelle Highline 2010

- 15 Colors
- Dual-Tone VW Rims (Design by OceanRAZR)
- Toned Rear Glass
- Highline Version
- Bad Roads Suspension (20 mm higher)
- Detailled Interior and Exterior
- Active Info Display for T5 (Design by OceanRAZR)
- Navigation Discover Ultra (Design by OceanRAZR)
- Sliding Door on the right
- Sliding Windows left and right
- 7 Seats


- - - DOWNLOAD - - -

[Sim File Share]


! The pictures only schow a few colors from all !

pretty tired of seeing this hair trope on Asian characters

EDIT: here’s an insightful look into this trope from divallon 

to reiterate, this is not necessarily a bad trope or stereotype 

it is overused in Western media and East-Asian women deserve more variety and better representation than this 

as shoorm put it it’s not the literal hairstyle that’s offensive, that’s not the point

it’s the subtleties that this trope carries, it’s about how race-specific this trope is