color tutorial

5

Hey friends!

Meg here for TUTOR TUESDAY! Just a quick beginning look at colors and some color theory! I’ve had a few recommendation for color palette stuff, so I hope this is a start! Paul has done some on color as well! If you have any recommendations send ‘em in here or my personal! Keep practicing, have fun, and I’ll see you next week!

5

Hello friends!

Meg here for another TUTOR TUESDAY! I’ve seen a lot of confusion surrounding what exactly CMYK, RGB, and RYB are and I thought I’d take a shot at clearing it up! If you have any recommendations for tutorials send ‘em here or my personal! Keep practicing, have fun, and I’ll see you next week!

6

Hey friends, it’s Meg!

Glad to be back at TUTOR TUESDAY, and a big thanks to Paul for taking over for two weeks! Big thanks to @wr3h for todays topic! I’m hoping to branch out more into styles/techniques in photoshop if y’all enjoy how this one went! I’m always open to recommendations, feel free to send them here or to my personal. Keep practicing, have fun, and I’ll see you next Tuesday!

anonymous asked:

im bad at colors, could you give a tutorial?

Sorry for taking so long Anon!!!

1. Choose your colors wisely

When it comes to colors, I try to pick 3 main colors. Then I make sure that my artwork revolves around these colors so that the colors won’t clash or look out of place. By doing this, I end up with one harmonious piece. Here are some examples:

2. Using the 3 main colors, choose a good background.
Backgrounds are super important because they set the mood of the piece. 

Look at the impact of the background. In the first image, the light blue lessens the emphasis on the plants and allows more focus on the girl. The overall feel is nice and more summer oriented. While the second image creates an illusion which makes the leaves look like they fade out in the darkness and gives emphasis on both the leaves and the girl. The overall feel is more of a tropical forest. When choosing a background color think about how the other parts will look above that color like which part will have more emphasis and depth.

3. Match the color of the foreground to the 3 main colors and the background
An example is my drawing of Steven and Connie snorkeling. 

If you notice, the one with the X shows how the original colors don’t mix well while the one with the check shows how the colors are more unified.

Step 1 - Mix the original color with the desired color in order for it to match the background. 
Step 2 - Incorporate that color and you are done.

4. You can also search for color palettes on the internet to make you more inspired. You can learn more color combinations too.

That’s all! I hope it was helpful!

anonymous asked:

Stumbled across your art recently, and I totally admire your work! As a complete noob to the digital art scene, I'd just like to ask whether you have any tips on colour picking (like for skin tones, under varied/dramatic lighting and such!). I have a ton of other things I want to ask, but I'll limit myself to one question and then try to google the rest, haha/ Thanks for sharing your art with us! ^^

ahh thank you so much! ♥ welcome to the digial art scene friend, i hope you enjoy your stay and ctrl + z

now onto your question! (if you don’t know what layer and layer modes are and how they generally work you should probably google that before you continue reading)

we all perceive colour differently (thx science) and i trust my intuition a lot when it comes to colour picking because of that, and also because i feel like you can make pretty much every colour combination work within the right context. context is key! but still, remember that all of this is about how i perceive colour, so you might not agree with everything i say.

here’s a quick rundown of terms you’ll see around a lot in reference to colours and shading: the hue, which is the ‘colour’ itself, the saturation aka the intensity, and the brightness [or value] which describes how dark or bright we perceive a colour to be.

rule of thumb: when you shade don’t just add black (or white) to your base colours, that will make your drawings boring and lifeless. use different hues and saturation!

now first things first: which skin colour does the character have?

you’ll mostly be navigating in the red to yellow spectrum for the skin tone. so when i pick the base colours i usually start with the skin and adjust the rest of the colours accordingly. if you’re not sure where to begin it might help if you first determine the values (brightness) of the base colours in grayscale.

and here are a few colour variations—i stuck to the approximate values but played around with a lot of different hues and levels of saturation.

now compare 3 and 5: you’ll notice that 3 is very bright and leans towards orange hues, whereas 5 has a pinkish tint.

on the left i gave 5 the hair colour of 3 and in my opinion the pink hue of the skin doesn’t go well with the orange undertone of the hair. you’ll have to experiment a lot to find out which combinations work for you.  

ctrl + u is your biggest friend (or image >> adjustments >> hue/saturation in photoshop, the shortcut works in sai and clip studio paint too). play with the sliders and see what happens. i do that a lot myself, because it’s easier to coordinate the colours like that afterwards instead of trying to manually pick perfectly matching ones right away.

for further adjustments i like to use an extra semi-transparent layer on top of everything with just a single colour to add atmospheric light. this unifies the colours and makes them more harmonious, if that’s what you’re looking for. this is about as far as i’d go if i didn’t want to shade the drawing.

if i do want to shade, especially with high contrasts and dramatic light, i darken the base by just adding an additional black layer, here set to 40% opacity. of course you could add a colour layer like the ones i mentioned previously too.

to create an impression of dramatic light you need a high contrast between light and dark areas (1). if i want additional visual intrest i often add secondary light which falls onto the main shadow areas. here i picked a faint greenish blue to balance out the yellow (2). and since light is at least partially reflected when it hits a surface you should add a faint glow that goes across the shadow/light border. i uses a mid-brown with a very soft brush on a layer set to overlay here (3).

for this shading style i like to use the layer mode colour dodge with lowered opacity + fill settings. for some layer modes opacity and fill do the exact same thing (e.g. for multiply or screen). however for colour dodge there’s a big difference:

a lowered opacity merely alters the transparency of the entire layer. that looks pretty awful sometimes, because the bright orange affects the dark of the hair much more intensely than the already brighter skin. but when you lower the fill percentage you primarily lower the amount of light that falls onto darker colours. so the layer’s opacity setting treats every colour equally whereas the fill setting takes their values into consideration. it might be hard to understand if you don’t try it out yourself, so just play around to get a feel for how it works!

and to summarise, here’s a process gif:

colour is an extremely big topic and i’ve only barely scratched the surface but i hope that still helped you out a little! the fastest way to learn is always to try things yourself, so grab a sketch and experiment. 👍

anonymous asked:

Can you talk about colors? (if you already didnt) Because boi the colors you pick for your art are just so STUNING LIKE THEY WAS MEANT FOI IT. Thanks ily

TO BE HONEST my color theory is rubbish but this is generally how i tend to think about colors! Hope this helps!

ALWAYS THINK TEMPERATURE!!  

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