color focusing

Today is International Women’s Day.

Today also marks the show of solidarity for women’s rights by way of a strike: A Day Without A Woman. Women around the world are refusing to take part in both paid and unpaid labor in the name of justice for all gender-oppressed people of all ethnicities, religions, and sexualities. In doing so, they join the ranks of women who have led protests, strikes, and movements throughout history.

Let’s celebrate a few of those women:

Dorothy Height (March 24, 1912—April 20, 2010)

Originally posted by womenthrive

Dorothy Height, former President of the National Council of Negro Women, was one of the organizers of the 1963 March on Washington. She stood near Martin Luther King Jr. during his “I Have a Dream” speech, but did not publicly speak that day. In fact, no woman publicly spoke. “Even on the morning of the march there had been appeals to include a woman speaker,” wrote Height in her memoir. “They were happy to include women in the human family, but there was no question as to who headed the household!“ In 1971, she helped found the National Women’s Political Caucus with other notable feminists like Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm.

Marsha P. Johnson (August 24, 1945—July 6, 1992)

Originally posted by dannisue

Marsha P. Johnson spent her entire adult life fighting for the rights of LGBTQ people. She’s credited for being one of the first to fight back in the Stonewall Riots. She started the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries with her friend Sylvia Rivera. Together they provided food, shelter, and care to young drag queens, trans women, and homeless children in need in the Lower East Side of NYC. She fought for what was right, and knew how to live life with exuberance and humor. When asked by a judge what what the “P” stood for, she replied “Pay It No Mind.”

Alice Paul (January 11, 1885—July 9, 1977)

Originally posted by taryndraws

Alice Paul was one of the leading forces behind the Nineteenth Amendment, which affirmed and enshrined a woman’s right to vote. She rallied 8,000 people to march in the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington—no small task in a world before the internet—with an estimated half million people watching the historic moment from the sidelines.

And some good activist blogs to follow:

  • Emily’s List (@emilys-list) slogan is “ignite change.” They aim to do so by backing pro-choice candidates for US office in key races across the country.
  • Women of Color in Solidarity (@wocinsolidarity) focuses on being a hub for the the WOC experience in the US. Original posts, incredibly informative reblogs…this place is wonderful.

Writing With Color Top Posts + Other Useful Ones

Oh hey– here’s a list ranked by Writing With Color’s most popular posts since opening in 2014 up till now, the start of 2017. Pulled together for the interest and usefulness for readers like you. Thank you.

Top 7 Popular Original Posts 

  1. Words for Skin Tone - This two part guide offers an array of words for describing skin color. Part I focuses on the problems with food descriptors. Part II provides alternatives. (68k+ Notes)
  2. Common Micro-aggressions: African Americans and/or Black People - An extensive list of common micro-aggressions towards Black people with some links for further reading. (46k)
  3. Words to Describe Hair - As with the words for skin tone, an offering of words to describe hair, from curls to different colors. (34k+)
  4. Black and White Symbolism: A Look into the Trope - Discusses concept of black as evil and white as good, from its history & problem implications. Guide offers alternatives & solutions. (10k)
  5. Describing Accents - An example-based post for describing accents and voices. (5k)
  6. How to Research your Racially/Ethnically Diverse Characters -     Self-explanatory. (5k) 
  7. Describing Asian Eyes - A guide to describing Asian eyes with further useful commentary. (4k)

Honorable Mentions

Other recommended WWC Posts.

  • Stereotyping Tropes List - A categorized tropes list reposted from the TV Tropes website with links to their topics on the subject matter.

–WWC 

Helpful tips and (free) apps for mobile devices that will help you in school and homework

Since we keep our phones and other devices on us at basically all times, they’re really accessible and useful. When it comes to school, though, these devices can become rather distracting. Sometimes in order to focus, you need to leave it in a different room! But if used correctly, your phone can actually help you do schoolwork.

Here, my friend, is a post about using your phone to help you study and do schoolwork.

Just remember that everyone works differently and focuses differently, so experiment! Try out these tips. Alter them. Try doing some and not others. See what works for you!

  1. Forest (app): This is an app that helps you focus; a tree is planted, and you set a timer. At the end of that timer, the tree has finished growing. If you use any other apps, the tree will wither and die. You can set a white list of apps that you deem productive; the app will allow these apps to be used during the focus time. At the end of each day, you have a forest of trees; it may be full of green trees, or withered trees.
    1. Use the whitelist! If music helps you focus, whitelist your music app. whitelist any homework/working apps on this list you want to use during your focus time. Whitelist your calculator. Just go through the list of apps and whitelist any that you will need.
    2. Don’t whitelist things you DON’T need. Remember the purpose of the app: to stay focused on SCHOOLWORK. Don’t whitelist things that will distract you.
  2. MyHomework (app): This app is incredibly useful. You put your scheduled classes into the app (there are tons of options for the class times; block schedules, period schedules, weekly or biweekly schedules, etc), then you add assignments, tests, homework, etc. It’s basically a virtual planner. It allows you to include priority level. Then when you go to see what assignments you have, you can sort it by priority, due date, class, or assignment type. It will give you alerts too.
    1. Widgets are miracles. This app has a widget for classes and for homework. It lets you see quickly what classes you have today, and what homework is due today, on your phone’s home screen.
    2. Get it on all your devices. It’s on everything. Kindle, Chrome OS, Android, IPhone, Mac, Windows… I don’t know about linux. 
  3. Cram (app): Basically, this app lets you make sets of flashcards virtually. It’s much easier than making paper flashcards, and it comes with you everywhere, so you can practice at any time. It comes with study programs, giving you easy ways to learn the subject fast. It also has a text-to-speech feature, and you can set one side to one language and one side to another language to help you with the pronunciation of words. It is the best form of flashcards I’ve ever used. 
  4. Duolingo (app): This is an app designed to help you learn a language like you would naturally: through a kind of submersion. It gives you little phrases and makes you translate them. When a new word is introduced, it is underlined and you may click it to see it’s definition, so you aren’t completely blind here. It also makes you do pronunciation, match words with definitions, and it has a few other activities. It doesn’t really give you lessons, it gives you practice. It has tons of languages, and it’s even going to introduce Klingon soon. One cool feature is the feedback: each language has admins, and when you don’t understand a sentence, you can ask about it in the comments. Another student, or an admin, may respond to your question with an answer.
    1. Use the desktop version when possible. The desktop version gives you access to actual basic lessons, and goes a bit more in-depth. The little sessons on the mobile phone are certainly helpful, and you will learn, but the desktop version is a bit more educational and even offers flashcards… Which the mobile version does not.
    2. It isn’t perfect. It isn’t good at grading your pronunciation, and sometimes a sentence can have two meanings, but it only accepts one. Luckily, you can always flag a question with a wrong answer, so it will be corrected by an admin. It’s a nice system.
    3. Practice daily! This app records your streaks, so you can keep track of how much you’re studying. An interesting feature in this app is fluency. If you stop practicing, your fluency number goes down. It keeps track of how well you’re doing in the lessons to track your fluency growth.
    4. Redo lessons. One interesting feature in this app is the way it makes you redo the lessons. Over time, the “strength” of each lesson goes down. You need to redo lessons for the strength to go up. This is to stop you from forgetting what you’ve learned.
  5. RescueTime (app): RescueTime is an app and desktop application. It goes on all your devices and records what you’re doing. Sounds creepy, but all it’s doing is telling you what you’re doing, and giving you a score on how productive you’re being. You mark some applications as being productive, some as neutral, some as distracting, etc, then it keeps you aware of what you’re doing too much of and what you aren’t doing enough of.
    1. Get it on EVERYTHING. For a while I only had it on my desktop, but then I found I was doing productive things on my chromebook and mobile too and I wanted those to be counted. I found that it inspired me to be much more productive with my time. On the bus, instead of playing a game on my phone, why not up my productivity with Cram? Seriously, it really makes you more productive. Get it on your phone, laptop, desktop, browser, whatever. Get it everywhere. And update to Premium if you can, it gives you a more detailed report.

Here are a few more tips for your phone in general:

Organise your apps into folders. For example, here is my homepage:

See the folders? I keep them color coded. The red folders are distracting: Social Media, Entertainment, Games. The Green ones are productive! The white and yellow are neutral.

Get widgets. They’re good at giving you quick information without having to open the app.

Experiment. Remember, everyone learns and focuses differently! Use your phone to your advantage.

Also, these are the apps that I use. There are so many other good apps. I’ve heard really good things about Memrise, a free app for learning languages that focuses on vocabulary. If didn’t include it in the main list because I’ve never used it and I don’t know much about it, but if you’re learning a language you should go check it out! I know I’m going to soon.

If you have tips or apps to add, please do!

8

Originally posted by dork-iplier

Requested by  welppotato <3
So, the request was to do a one-shot series type of deal so… Look forward to an unhealthy amount of Sean related stuff (smut included!)

2;

MASTERLIST.

He was blindly scrolling through twitter, re-tweeting a post here and there before sighing.In a few days he was to leave for a Youtuber convention – and no, it wasn’t because he wasn’t excited to see his friends, he was just tired. Checking a few things online, his eyes roamed back to twitter a confused brow raised at the number one trending topic - #markipliercantdance and #allhailthedancingqueen took the second place.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Hi there. I saw your post on how life is at SCAD majoring wise and was curious about what one might do if a school doesn't offer a sequential program. I wanted to go to scad, but due to finances and travel the option was less afforadable than another art school. Would you have any suggestions on what one could do to study sequential art on their own? Books, online course suggestions? (I apologize if this is a lot of questions, I completely understand if I'm asking too much.)

Hey! So having only gone to SCAD I’m no expert, but here’s what I’d do, as someone who is currently trying to get into comics. I’m starting from only an illustration background, so it’s challenging, but I think it’s very doable!

First of all, any traditional drawing skills classes you can take in or out of school would be great. Figure drawing, perspective drawing, construction drawing, and so on. Basically building up the skills to be able to draw most things out of your head and have them look reasonably convincing.

Secondly, read comics! You’ll have a much easier time learning to make comics if you’ve read lots of them and generally understand how they work. Make sure to read both webcomics and “classic” print comics, and try ones from different places! American comics are very different from Japanese comics, which themselves are very different from Belgian or French comics.

Lastly, here’s a list of books I’ve bought for classes and for myself, that I’ve found helpful

  • Understanding Comics - Scott McCloud - What it says on the tin. This goes over a lot of the structure of comics as it’s understood, and covers a lot of central concepts we’ve all experienced in reading comics but probably never thought about. If nothing else it’s a fun read!
  • Making Comics - Scott McCloud - Similar to the first one, but covers more angles of the art of actually MAKING comics. Reading this always gets me pumped to draw
  • The Five C’s of Cinematography - Joseph V. Mascelli (can probably get this one for free as a PDF. I got it for like $6 on Amazon) - Admittedly haven’t read this yet but it’s required reading for a class I have next quarter and comes strongly recommended. I assume it covers a lot of the fundamentals of framing a shot, timing action, and so on that apply to comics as well as film.
  • Rapid Viz - Kurt Hanks (same as above. Can probably get it for free. I got it used for real cheap) - Great intro to perspective and construction drawing! Also has a lot of exercises in it that are worth doing if you’re a beginner to constructing forms on the page. If you have no idea how to draw a gun or a car or a building, this has stuff in it that you’re gonna want.
  • Color and Light - James Gurney - Got this for myself because my color needs work. This focuses more on traditional painting, but has a ton of great info about how light works and how it translates to painting. This is a great supplement to a color theory class, and has beautiful artwork in it as well! James Gurney also has a website and youtube channel with videos that I’ve found useful or inspiring in the past.
  • Creative Illustration - Andrew Loomis - Loomis is often pretty dated, but this book covers some veeerrrryyyy important fundamentals on composition. Stuff I still struggle with a lot. Also, once again, this whole thing is available for free as a PDF!
  • Just a whole bunch of art books. Never enough art books. Here’s my shelf. Note: not enough art books.

    (Edit: The best art book I own is The Art of Wolfenstein: The New Order. Highly recommend this one even if you’re not into the game. It has some gorgeous art, but more importantly some nice iterations in the design process and a lot of good commentary about design decisions. This is everything I want from an art book. The game rocks too. Can’t wait for the new one!)
DIET TIPS

Despite being a thinspo/anorexia blog, I would never encourage people to choose my path. All of my followers probably want to lose weight - so here are a few healthy diet tips!

1. NEVER GET TOO HUNGRY - Hunger is a primal urge that’s difficult to deny. When you’re famished, it’s hard to hold off until you can find healthy food. As a result, you end up eating anything that’s not nailed down, and typically, regretting it. Planning meals and snacks works wonders to head off the intense hunger that can do a number on your best intentions to eat right.

2. USE THE RED, ORANGE AND GREEN RULE - At each meal include one food that is any of these colors. By focusing on these foods, you’ll be sure to get some produce on your plate and won’t have space on your plate for higher-calorie fare. 

3. DRINK ENOUGH WATER - Water is essential for keeping the body hydrated and we’re actually more likely to retain “water weight” by not drinking enough of it rather than by having too much. 

4. KICK THE SALT HABIT - Salt is a big contributor to weight gain and often a reason why the numbers on the scale aren’t going down. The average American consumes twice the amount of salt they should have each day, leading to weight gain, bloating, and the inability to lose stubborn pounds. Salt can also make you feel hungrier and thirstier, so check the nutrition labels for high sodium levels and choose fresh over packaged or restaurant foods. You’ll see a puffy face and belly go down quicker just by cutting back on your sodium intake and choosing more natural foods.

5. DON’T THINK DIET SODA WILL MAKE YOU LOSE WEIGHT - Just…just don’t, okay?

6. FOCUS ON NUTRIENT BALANCE INSTEAD OF COUNTING ALL THE CALORIES - Making sure an eating occasion has carbs, protein, and fat instead of just counting calories (like a 100 calorie pack) delivers better energy and fat loss results by giving the body what it needs, like quick- and longer-digesting nutrients so you stay full longer.

7. KEEP A FOOD JOURNAL - Keeping a food record is vital to losing weight and keeping it off long term.