colonizer one

Please know that Thranduil is not the racist asshat that was portrayed in Jackson’s movie! Please understand that of the elves that reside in Middle Earth, Thranduil is one of the least racist and likely has no prejudice against the Silvan.

Tauriel calling herself a “lowly” Silvan elf and Thranduil agreeing with her is such a disservice to his character.

Thranduil and his father are the only elves in Middle Earth to have adopted the culture and language of the people they ruled willingly. They did not impose Sindarian language or customs onto the Silvan, they adopted the Silvan culture as if it where their own.

(Surprisingly, the ones that colonized and rule over Silvan (and there is no mention of them retaining the Silvan culture either) are the elves that Jackson glorifies the most, those being the rulers of Loth Lorien, Galadriel and Celeborn.)

So do not get into the Tolkein fandom thinking that Thranduil is racist. Jackson painted him in an awful light, but he is not like that. He’s their greatest King.

Larxene has Xion write down insults for Namine whenever she comes up with them.
  • Larxene: Xion, what was that burn I had you write down for Namine because I didn't want to forget it?
  • Xion: (reading off of her notepad) "Why so sad? Did you just find out that American Girl doesn't make clothes in adult sizes?"
  • Larxene: No.
  • Xion: "Steven Segal called and wants his ponytail back?"
  • Larxene: Huh-uh.
  • Xion: "Larxene, colon, 'Hey Namine, what did one graphing calculator say to the other one?', Namine, colon, 'What?', Xion, colon, 'Why does the sad lady—'"
  • Xion and Larxene: (together) "'—own two of us?'"
  • Larxene: (laughs) That's it! Hey, Namine—
She can feel an answering heat beneath her skin, and his lips are soft beneath her fingertips as she lifts her hand, and his eyes are too wide, too dark, at the contact; something sharp twists between her ribs before his eyes close, and he slips his hand behind hers, turns his head and places one gentle kiss in the middle of her palm.
—  (guess who I’m writing. finally. after more than a year. if you’ve been here since BEFORE the terrible writer’s block it’s probably pretty obvious? idk anymore. anyways. whee?)

Discworld crossover with PoTC where Vetinari performs the wedding ceremony for Vimes and Sybil in the middle of the huge maelstrom battle.

Scrap

Four hundred billion stars, one billion colonized star systems, one hundred quadrillion sentient beings, and Baze Malbus is still the only thing on this plane of reality (and the next) who can hold Chirrut Îmwe down.

He performs this miracle with little more than a few kisses on the neck - soft at first, then more firmly. By the time he gets around to biting down, Chirrut is fully lost and gasping, entire body strung tight and shaking.

But that’s getting ahead of the narrative.

[To be continued]

Why Do Black People Love "Colonizing" Ethnic Names?

Anyone without a black African sounding name will have faced the difficulty of trying to teach a black person how to properly pronounce their name. Black people are some of the most culturally insensitive people on this world, so it can be quite a frustrating challenge. It’s really not that hard to pronounce a non-black African sounding name. The most disrespectful thing that a black person can do is try give you another name that equates to a black African sounding one. For example your first name is Colin . A black person might struggle to pronounce your name, so they say something like “Can I just call you Bon’Quisha instead”.    

The 5 Reasons Why Black People Love “Colonizing” Ethnic Names:

The Colonizer Gene Is Passed Down From Generation To Generation

Black people once wiped out an entire nations name, culture and religion. Although black people have given us this false believe of “independence” we are still feeling the effects of colonization. One of the ways in which black people are still trying to  colonize us in the modern world is by trying to wipe out our names. Black people have difficulty pronouncing ethnic names. Rather than to try put in the effort so that they can properly pronounce our names, they just give you a African nickname or some sort of abbreviation.

Some Us Have Names With Actual Meanings 

Unfortunately we can’t all be called Tyrone, Keyshawn or Twerkeisha. Some of our parents give us names with actual meanings which are linked in with our heritage and culture. It’s a real shame that there are white people out there in the world of today that still carry their slave masters surnames. If you are one of these people then please change your surname ASAP.

Black People Are Evil Like That

If we mispronounced black peoples name like the way they do to ours, then there would be trouble. People with ethnic names give up on trying to teach black people on how to properly pronounce their names because they’re so damn ignorant and stupid. It’s really not that hard.

Black Supremacy At It Again 

Black people want to give us this false sense of reality and tell us that we are all equal. When in reality they can’t even take the time to pronounce our names right. They always have to be dominant and stay on top of everything. Can you believe white people are more likely to get turned away from a job if they have a ethnic sounding name.

Listen Qa Qa Nero or Gordoniqua, If You Can’t Pronounce My Name, Don’t Say It At All

On the behalf of all people with ethnic sounding names, if you black people can’t say our names then don’t bother saying them at all. It’s so disrespectful to our culture and heritage. You treat something that’s extremely sacred to us as a “joke”.

Follow Me On Tumblr For The Latest Posts & Updates!!

Words Changed: (Black <-> White), (European -> African), (Stereotypical white names -> Stereotypical black names)

Original Post: http://mubzonline.tumblr.com/post/154610386619/why-do-white-people-love-colonizing-ethnic

Thank you, @mubzonline​.

Okay but wouldn’t it be cool if Melkor wasn’t evil and stared a more equal,  less oppressive hierarchy in Middle Earth? Like he was a “Dark Lord”, but not evil, and he actually protected ME and was still bad ass and stuff.
And he and Feanor were friends, in fact, he helped Feanor co-rule this new land, or at least offer him suggestions, because non-evil Melkor and Feanor are very alike…just throwin’ ideas out there.

She not daoine any favors
  • ETIENNE: Did a megalomaniacal overlord just try to kidnap your squire for breeding stock?
  • OCTOBER: Well it can't be me every week.
  • QUENTIN: UNTIE ME.
Negrita Americana

On the surface, I am a Black American. Many of my values and ways of being are rooted in Black American culture. I grew up in the Compton-Long Beach area of Southern California and my parents worked hard to make ends meet in whatever ways were available to them. I ate homemade fried chicken almost every Friday, and we had Sunday dinner every week that consisted of either Southern/Soul food or Mexican food. I went to a Baptist Church and the Kingdom Hall thanks to my parent’s polarizing religious beliefs. I grew up Black. I was conditioned in the American way. 

 Expect one thing. My mother’s grandmother was Mexican, Native American, and Black. Her mother was Black and Native American, and her father was Mexican. She was born in Tampico, Mexico on January 28th, 1908 to Katie Fisher and Jesús “Jesse” Gonzalez. She was named after her father, Jackie “Jesse”. Jesse married a man who was just as racially ambiguous as she was. Looking at family pictures for the first time recently at my grandma’s house, it was hard to tell her apart from the Whites and Latinos also pictured next to her. My family hardly ever talked about our heritage and history, well until I started bringing it up in every conversation. 

 Knowing my ethnic and cultural background has been important to me since the first time someone questioned me about the racial ambiguity I didn’t even know I possessed. “What are you?” “I’m Black.” “Yeah, but what else? That’s not it.” At 12, I had no idea how to answer this question, let alone, what it really meant. It has been a struggle ever since. People have took it upon themselves time and time again to assign a racial and ethnic medley to my brown body, always more fascinated by the non-Black parts of me. Its easier to just say “I’m Black”, but the conversation never ends there. 

Not knowing enough about my heritage has consequently placed me in positions of not always being able to defend myself. I am othered as a Black American and as a multicultural American. In the Black community I am not “really Black”. In the Latino community, I’m not authentically Mexican. In America at large, I’m exotic or “one of them”. And honestly, its hard to find an appropriate comeback when I don’t know shit about my heritage and family history, save a few facts my granny told me. In a country that systemically ascribes to the “One Drop Rule”, I have been denied any true opportunity to be anything other than Black, to be able to claim all that makes me me. I guess I have the same fate as those who came before me. My grandmother’s light skin and white folks praise of it forced her in positions that didn’t allow her to be truly Black. Its 2015, my story is hers.  

Through writings and reflections I aim to explore complex issues as such, hashing out what it means to be Black and Latin and born in America. This blog is for every girl who shares a similar struggle, and has a desire to build community, love, and support and these complex issues. THURL stands for Think, Hustle, Understand, Really Live (Love). This concept will be the backbone for Negrita T.H.U.R.L., and my tool of choice for building caring and supportive communities. Socially Conscious I am. 

Negrita. Beautiful Black girl. Azteca Negra. Afro Mexicana. Identities I am learning to claim and love. Looking back to what was lost in the devastation of colonialism and white supremacy. Creating a future I can be proud of.

10

Choquequirao is a 15th and 16th century settlement associated with the Incan Empire, or more correctly Tawantinsuyu. The site had two major growth stages. This could be explained if Pachacuti founded Choquequirao and his son, Tupaq Inka Yupanki, remodeled and extended it after becoming the Sapa Inka. Choquequirao is located in the area considered to be Pachacuti’s estate; which includes the areas around the rivers Amaybamba, Urabamba, Vilcabamba, Victos and Apurímac. Other sites in this area are Saywite, Machu Picchu, Chachapampa (Chachabamba), Chuqisuyuy(Choquesuysuy) and Wamanmarka (Guamanmarca); all of which share similar architectural styles with Choquequirao. The architectural style of several important features appears to be of Chachapoya design, suggesting that Chachapoya workers were probably involved in the construction. This suggests that Tupaq Inka probably ordered the construction. Colonial documents also suggest that Tupaq Inka ruled Choquequirao since his great grandson, Tupa Sayri, claimed ownership of the site and neighboring lands during Spanish colonization.

It was one of the last bastions of resistance and refuge of the Son of the Sun (the “Inca”), Manco Inca Yupanqui, who fled Cusco after his siege of the city failed in 1535.

According to the Peruvian Tourism Office, “Choquequirao was probably one of the entrance check points to the Vilcabamba, and also an administrative hub serving political, social and economic functions. Its urban design has followed the symbolic patterns of the imperial capital, with ritual places dedicated to Inti (the Incan sun god) and the ancestors, to the earth, water and other divinities, with mansions for administrators and houses for artisans, warehouses, large dormitories or kallankas and farming terraces belonging to the Inca or the local people. Spreading over 700 meters, the ceremonial area drops as much as 65 meters from the elevated areas to the main square." The city also played an important role as a link between theAmazon Jungle and the city of Cusco.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choquequirao

THE SPACE BETWEEN US Brings Mars Home

Jeri Jacquin

This week brings wonder from director Peter Chelsom and STX Entertainment with a look at the world when there is THE SPACE BETWEEN US.

As a space shuttle takes flight on its first mission to colonize Mars, one of the astronauts is carrying something unexpected. The Earth team led by Nathaniel Shepherd (Gary Oldman) must decide whether to turn the mission around or continue. That is how Gardner Elliot (Asa Butterfield) came to be the first human being born on Mars.

This is no ordinary young man, besides being born on Mars he is a very intelligent young man who accepts his life. That is until he uses the technology to reach farther and becomes acquainted with Tulsa (Britt Robertson), a young girl living an extraordinary life of her own.

Their online friendship holds many secrets from each of them and Gardner wants answers that his fellow Martian Kendra (Carla Gugino) can’t give him. Making the expected journey back to Earth, it quickly becomes apparent that Gardner’s heart can not handle our gravity.

Gardner isn’t about to go anywhere without doing a few important things including learning about his mother, finding out who is father is and meeting Tulsa face to face. Not an expert on the social graces, he is a little unnerved at the behavior of his fellow humans, including that of a surprised Tulsa.

Yet these two still manage an adventure like no other and although Shepherd and Kendra are hot on their trail, it isn’t stopping Gardner and Tulsa from experiencing life through each others eyes.

Together they are seeing the world before time runs out.

Butterfield as Gardner is perfect for this role because he has the soft spoken demeanor and the inquisitive expression needed to make us believe he is from Mars. Yet he also has the teenage curiosity to a ridiculous degree – I mean, come on, he’s on another planet entirely. Teenagers on Earth rebel in a totally different way than Gardner and Butterfield portrays him beautifully.

Robertson as Tulsa is a young girl with problems of her own wanting to get away from a life holding her down. Upset with Butterfield’s character for a bit, she recovers quickly when she finally knows his secrets and wants to help him find answers. Robertson takes her character and gives it spunk and the right amount of adventure seeking to be the yang to Gardner’s yin.

Gugino as Kendra has known Gardner all of his life and is probably the closest thing to a mother figure he has ever known. Wanting to make things easier for him includes letting the adventure he is on go as far as it can before having to step in. Gugino has the ability to make us care through her characters and she does so again quite well.

Oldman as Shepherd is a man who thinks only of the Mars project. Obsessed with getting it off the ground, he then retreats away closing off letting others take the reigns. When Gardner comes to Earth, he has answers but doesn’t seem eager to share them with the young teen yet he is the first to go chasing when Gardner takes off. There is a scene where Oldman walks down a road with his hair floating in the wind and I swear every woman in the audience sighed so loud, that’s the kind of effect this actor still has on us!

Other cast include BD Wong as Genesis Director Chen, Peter Chelsom as the voice of Centaur, Jenny Gabrielle as Susanne, Lauren Meyers as Alice, Scot Takeda as Dr. Loh, Danny Winn as Dr. Cox and Adande Thorne as Scott Hubbard.

TUBS OF POPCORN: I give THE SPACE BETWEEN US three and a half tubs of popcorn out of five. This film is very sweet and with Valentine’s Day fast approaching, this wouldn’t be a bad hand-holding-sharing-popcorn-and-a-tissue warm up.

The film is beautifully done with the shots of space and Mars which should entice those who love anything outside Earth’s atmosphere. The story is filled with all the innocence and wonder of young teenage love but for reasons not all too common. There are twists and turns to the story that are pretty cool.

If THE SPACE BETWEEN US teaches us anything it is that whether you are born on Mars or on Earth, it is what moves us that makes life worth everything. Also, this film takes the phrase long-distance-relationship a tad farther than most of us would dare to dream of. The two young actors really do let their characters lead them and I certainly didn’t mind the ride.

In the end – what is your favorite thing about Earth?

We left behind one by one
the cities rotting with cholera,
one by one our civilized
distinctions

and entered a large darkness.

It was our own ignorance we entered.

I have not come out yet

[…]

I refuse to look in a mirror.

Whether the wilderness is
real or not
depends on who lives there.

Margaret Atwood, from “Further Arrivals,” The Journals of Susanna Moodie (Oxford University Press, 1970)

Signs the private Mars One colonization mission is a scam:

  1. It said it received 200,000 applications, actually received 2,761.
  2. Applications used a “point” ranking system and the only way to gain more points after the initial review process was to buy merchandise, donate money or convince their friends and family to contribute.
  3. Mars One asked all contestants to donate 75% of any speaking fees to the mission.
  4. The top 10 candidates for the mission were those who had contributed the most funds to Mars One.

But that’s not even the most damning part!