cologni

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Villa Diodati

The Villa Diodati is a mansion in the village of Cologny near Lake Geneva in Switzerland, notable because Lord Byron rented it and stayed there with John Polidori in the summer of 1816. Mary Shelley and Percy Bysshe Shelley, who had rented a house nearby, were frequent visitors. Because of poor weather, in June 1816 the group famously spent three days together inside the house creating stories to tell each other, two of which were developed into landmark works of the Gothic horror genre: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and The Vampyre, the first modern vampire story, by Polidori. Read More || Edit

On This Day...

On this day in 1816, English poet Lord Byron hosted fellow ex-pats Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and his personal physician John Polidori at his rented summer home at Villa Diodati in the village of Cologny near Lake Geneva, Switzerland. The weather outside was miserably cold and rainy, preventing any lake excursions. To pass the time, Byron read from the Fantasmagoriana; a French anthology of German ghost stories. At the end of the reading, Byron challenged everyone present to devise their own horror stories. This challenge resulted in Mary Shelley writing Frankenstein, Polidori in writing The Vampyre, and Byron himself in writing the poem “Darkness.”

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 30, p. 84r by e-codices
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Manuscript title: Calendarium (Prayer calendar), Latin Bible selections: Liber Psalmorum, Cantica with prayers; Hymns, etc. Manuscript summary: This codex from southern Germany is composed of two parts bound together in one German binding in 1569. The first part of the manuscript contains about a hundred leaves from the 12th and 13th centuries. It begins with a calendar featuring numerous constellations and full page illustrations. Following are prayers and liturgical songs. The second part consists of thirty leaves containing a series of Latin prayers in carefully wrought late 14th century Gothic script. Origin: Germany Period: 13th/14th Image source: Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 30: Calendarium (Prayer calendar), Latin Bible selections: Liber Psalmorum, Cantica with prayers; Hymns, etc. (www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/cb/0030)

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Manuscript title: Passover Haggadah

Manuscript summary: This Hebrew manuscript from the 15th century combines liturgical texts and commentaries on the rites that provide the temporal foundation for the observation of Passover. The Passah-Haggadah, adorned with miniatures and rich illustrations, contains the complete liturgical version of the Exodus story. The first part of the manuscript contains the text of the Italian rite, the second part that of the Ashkenazi. This manuscript was written and illuminated by Joël ben Siméon, who signed his work with a Kolophon (f. 34r): I am Joel ben Simeon, called Veibusch Ashkenazi – blessed be his memory – and I am from Cologne, which is on the banks of the Rhine.

Origin: Cologne (Germany)

Period: 15th century

Image source: Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 81: Passover Haggadah

Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 905, f. 03r by e-codices
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Manuscript title: Codex Testeriano Bodmer Manuscript summary: Testeriano denotes catechism manuscripts in a pictographic script attributed to the Franciscan friar and missionary Jacobo de Testera (16th century). Writing had already developed in 12th century Central America as a mixture of ideograms, pictograms and phonetic symbols, but the original handwritten witnesses thereof were destroyed in the Spanish Conquest in the 16th century. In order to communicate with the indigenous population, Christian missionaries later adopted this writing system, but they invented many symbols since the goal was to communicate a new, Christian content. For instance, three crowned heads represent the Trinity and thus God, while two crowned heads with key and sword represent the apostles Peter and Paul. The manuscript is read from left to right across both pages; different parts are separated by decorative vertical vignettes. The manuscript contains several short prayers (among them pp. 1v-2r Persignum, 2v-4r Ave Maria, 4v-8r Credo) and a long prayer (pp. 27v-35r) which represents a repetition of the Christian doctrine. Origin: Mexico Period: 16th century Image source: Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 905: Codex Testeriano Bodmer (www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/list/one/fmb/cb-0905).