colleges

How To Write A Cover Letter When You Have No Experience

For students who have no fancy internships or summer jobs on their razor-thin résumés, here’s some advice:

1) The first paragraph should say who you are, where you go to school, what the job is that you’re applying for and how you came to apply. It helps a lot if you can include a name of someone with a personal connection.

2) The second paragraph has to connect the dots between you and the employer. Describe how your experiences meet the challenges presented in the job description.

3) In the third paragraph, further describe your personal traits and how they make you a great candidate for the job.

4) To wrap up, say when you’ll get in touch.

5) In most cases, send the letter as an attachment and format it like an old-fashioned business letter with your address at the top, then the date and then the address of the recipient.

6)  Proofread carefully and get someone you trust to check for spelling, grammar and word use.

Read more.

High School VS College

While in high school, my teachers always told me that college was going to be much more difficult. That these were the easy days. And that no professor would ever put up with our shenanigans. 

To put it simply, they were right and wrong. 

Right in the sense that the workload is a lot different. Not exactly harder, but definitely different. There is more work expected of you; longer papers, more readings, tests are more frequent and are seldom reviewed for in class. 

But they were also wrong. My professors in college have been hugely more accepting and easier to work with than my high school teachers. They understand that we have lives outside of their class and are willing to work with you to make sure that you will pass. With open communication, most of my professors have given me extensions when I needed it and were much more likely to explain the topic to me one on one. I’ve had professors so laid back that I could get up in the middle of class, tell them I was going to go get soup, and come back 15 minutes later with absolutely no issue. 

College is also easier for me because of the different lifestyle. Instead of going to the same 6 classes back to back 5 days a week for 7 hours straight everything is split up. I have roughly 2 to 3 classes a day which are about an hour and a half long. So instead of doing homework for all 5 courses every single night you have time to split everything up. Living this way is much less stressful for me. 

The commute is also very different. To go to high school I had to take a truck, a boat, and a bus to get to school everyday waking up at 5:00am and getting home at 6:00pm. For college, I can wake up at 10:00am, have time to shower and eat, go to my classes, and be back in my dorm by 3:30pm. Similarly, I have everything I need at my fingertips living on campus. There are always friends nearby, always food available, and the gym is a short walk away. 

I’m so much happier in college than I was in high school. Honestly, you couldn’t pay me enough to spend another 4 years in high school. 

-Meghan

College WordBank!

There are a lot of words that may seem new and weird throughout college applications, so here is a list of words that I defined in order to help you glide through the application process!

The Basics: Treat Yo Self! (and know the facts!)


1. Undergraduate: An undergraduate student is someone who is obtaining an undergraduate education or degree, such as a Bachelor’s degree.

2. Private University: A Private University is a college that is privately funded. They tend to be smaller than public universities as well.

3. Public University: A Public University is a college that is publicly funded, specifically through the national government. They tend to be larger than private universities.

4. Safety School: When applying to colleges, a safety school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is lower than your stats, which indicates that it may be easier for you to get in (since you have higher stats than the average).

5. Target School: A target school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is similar to your stats, which indicates that you are the same level as other applicants.

6. Reach School: A reach school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is higher than your stats, indicating that it is a more competitive college.

7. College Confidential: A website full of threads and information about college admissions. Although some of the pages found on College Confidential are helpful, there are some things found on this site that may discourage you for no apparent reason, such as “Chance Me” threads. Therefore, I advise you to steer clear of College Confidential and, by all means, do not let it get to your head!

8. “Chance Me’s”: “Chance Me” are threads found online where people write their stats and ask for others to see if they can get accepted to a specific college. I advise you NOT to trust these things, as people online do not know your chances of getting into a specific school.

9. Common App: Also known as the Common Application, the Common App is an application used for undergraduate admissions to a multitude of colleges. A majority of colleges accept the Common App, but I suggest looking in on the ones you want to apply to in order to know for sure.

10. Universal College Application: Similar to the Common App, the Universal College Application is also a site used by many people to send their college applications.

11. SAT II’s: Also known as SAT Subject Tests, the SAT II’s are exams that are taken in specific subject areas, such as Biology, Math I/II, and US History. Many colleges do not require SAT Subject Tests. However, it is important to check and see if some colleges require you to take an SAT Subject Test, or if it is optional. Although it may be optional for the college, it is still your decision if you would like to take this exam or not for admission purposes.

12. Transcript: A report of all the grades you have received in each class that you have taken during high school. Colleges require an official transcript to be sent to the admissions office.

13. Recommendation Letter: A letter that details why you are an excellent fit in said college. These letters usually come from teachers, faculty, coaches, mentors, etc. Recommendation letters should NOT be written by a family member.

14. Personal Statement: A Personal Statement is basically a college essay. Many colleges require you to write at least one, while others require more than one essay.

15. Need Blind Admissions: Need-Blind Admissions is when colleges will decide on your admissions decision without looking at your financial information. To clarify, this means that the college will decide on your admissions decision solely on your application and not on your financial information.

16. Waitlisted: Waitlisted is sort of the middle ground for colleges. When you are waitlisted, it does not mean that you are accepted or rejected. Instead, it means that you are put on a “waiting list” and, if the colleges enrollment numbers from their accepted students are lower than expected, they will accept more people from the waitlist.  

17. Deferred: Deferred is when a college pushes your application to the next filing period. This means that you have not been accepted or rejected yet. Instead, the college has pushed your application in order to review it again and make a final decision. A deferral only happens if you have applied Early Action or Early Decision.

18. Legacy (Applicant): A legacy applicant is someone who is applying to a college that a family member has went to, usually their parents.


Types of Applications (it’s “ED” as one, two, three! Get it!?)


1. ED/Early Decision: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is binding. This means that if you are accepted to said college under Early Decision, you are required to go there upon acceptance. Usually, the application deadline is in November and admission decisions are in Mid-December. Something to note about this is that you can apply to only one school with an “Early Decision” (since it is binding), but you can apply to other schools with a different filing period, such as Early Action and Regular Decision.

2. EA/Early Action: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is not binding. This means that you are applying earlier than the normal application period and you will NOT be required to go to said college upon acceptance. Similar to ED, Early Action’s deadline is around November, but the admissions decision’s date varies. Unlike the Early Decision, you can apply to as many Early Action’s as you want (unless Single Choice Early Action, more on that below)

3. Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action: This is a type of application filing period where you are only allowed to apply to one Early Action school. However, this means that Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action is still non-binding (not required to go upon acceptance), but you can only apply to one school under Early Action. Similar to ED, you are able to apply to colleges under other types of filing periods, such as Regular Decision.

4. RD/Regular Decision: This is the normal time when applications are due. Regular Decision is the time when most people apply to colleges. The applications are usually due in January and results typically come out in March (although, it may vary depending on the college). Regular Decisions are non-binding and you can apply to as many as you want.

5. Rolling Admissions: This is a type of application filing period when you apply to a college and the college admissions office reviews them as they receive the applications. Unlike ED/EA/RD, Rolling Admissions does not have a set date where you can go and look for your college admissions decision. Typically, the college will give you a time frame in which they will give you your admission decision, which is possibly around 2-8 weeks depending on the college. Something to note is that a lot of colleges with Rolling Admissions may not have a distinct deadline for the application, but they will have a “priority deadline” where, if you submit your application before that date, then they will get back to you sooner. Overall, the earlier you submit your application for Rolling Admissions, the quicker you will know your decision.

6. Open Admission: This is a type of application filing where colleges accept all students, as long as they have completed high school or have a GED.


Financial Aid: Dolla Dolla Bills Y'All!


1. Grant: A grant is money that you receive in your financial aid packet that you will NOT have to pay back.

2. Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back.

3. Scholarships: A scholarship is money earned due to certain achievements, such as academic, athletic, etc. Similar to a grant, it is money given to you that you do not need to pay back. However, for a scholarship, it may be awarded by the college or awarded separately by applying for one.

4. FAFSA: Also known as the “Free Application for Federal Student Aid”, the FAFSA is a website that most colleges will advise you to use in order to receive financial aid from colleges. The FAFSA application will ask for information on your household’s tax forms in order to determine how much grant and loan money you may receive. The FAFSA application opens on January 1st of every year, but deadlines for completing the application varies for every college. Something to note is that you will need to apply for Financial Aid every year in order to receive aid while you are in college.

5. CSS Profile: Also known as the “College Scholarship Service Profile”, the CSS Profile is found on the College Board website where you apply in order to receive more financial aid. Many colleges require the CSS Profile (and sometimes early on), so I advise you to see if it is required.

6. Expected Family Contribution (EFC): This is a number found on your FAFSA that provides an estimate of the amount of money your family will be expected to pay for your education. To note, this estimate is the amount of money you will be expected to pay after financial aid is accounted for.

7. Institutional Grant: An institutional grant is money given by the college that you do not have to pay back. This is different compared to the federal grant, since the federal grant is provided by the government instead of the college itself.

8. Merit-Based Grants: These are grants that are made due to academic achievement.

9. Need-Based Grants: These grants are given to students due to their level of income.

10. Federal Pell Grant: This grant is money that the federal government gives you that you will NOT pay back.

11. Institutional Loans: An institutional loan is money given by the college that you have to pay back. This is different than the federal loans, since the federal loans are provided by the government instead of the college itself.

12. Direct Subsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Subsidized Loan is a federal loan that pays the loan’s interest while you are in college. However, once your undergraduate education is completed, you will be required to start paying the Direct Subsidized Loan (Note: this loan allows a six month grace period before you starting paying).

13. Direct Unsubsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a federal loan that does not pay the loan’s interest while you are in college. This means that, as you continue through college, you are responsible for paying the loan’s interest. However, if you decide you don’t want to pay the loan’s interest while in college, then the interest will be added to the principal (or the original loan’s amount).

14. Perkins Loan: The Perkins Loan is given to students depending on their school, as some schools do not participate in the Perkins Loan. Similar to all loans, it is money borrowed now that must be paid back later. However, unlike the other loans stated here, this loan is a college issued loan instead of a federal loan, meaning that the money is paid back to the college not the government.

15. (Parent) PLUS Loan: A PLUS Loan is a loan taken out on the parents name for an undergraduate student. This means that parents with undergraduate students may use this money for college expenses. PLUS Loans are to be paid back to the federal government.

16. Work Study Program: The Work Study Program is one in which a student may hold a job on campus while earning their degree/education. You can apply for the Work Study Program through the FAFSA application. The money you earn from this job can be used on anything, from tuition to food, etc.


You’re In College! Now what… (Everything you need to know while in college)


1. Major: A specific area that an undergraduate student focuses on during college. The student must follow and complete the courses stated in their specified major in order to receive their degree.  

2. Minor: Although it is not required, some undergraduate students choose a minor in order to have a secondary focus. If you choose to minor, you do not receive another degree. Instead, minoring in something during college is solely for your own personal interest and to expand your knowledge.

3. Double Major: When you double major in something it means that you are following two specified areas. Double Majors receive two degrees for the areas in which they studied.

4. Undeclared: To be undeclared in college is to not choose a major/degree. Many people go into college undeclared, while some are even undeclared up until their second year of college. However, depending on your college, there may be a specific time or deadline to declare a major, since you will eventually be required to have one in order to obtain a degree.

5. Placement Test: A placement test is a preliminary test in order to see what level you are in specific subjects. These are normally taken when you have selected a college to attend (as an entering college freshman) and must register for classes. Also, something to note, all colleges do not have placement tests.

6. Bursar Office: The Bursar Office is the branch of the college that takes care of payments and billing statements for the student.

7. Financial Aid Office: The Financial Aid Office is the branch of the college that takes care of the financial aid aspect for the student, such as determining grant money.

8. Registrar: The Registrar Office is where they handle student records and scheduling for the college.

9. Commuting/Commuter: A commuter is a student who travels to college from where they reside. This is a longer distance than the typical five minutes off campus.

10. Transfer Student: A transfer student is someone who is changing from one college to another. Most people who change colleges decide once they know that their credits will transfer to the next college.

6

With a GPA of 101.6, one could think Augusta Uwamanzu-Nna simply sailed through high school, but they would be mistaken. For Uwamanzu-Nna, “there are no secrets and no shortcuts to academic success.” Augusta is hoping to make an impact on Nigeria and is already making headway into her altruistic endeavors.

10

Our Top 10 Fashion Colleges 

Ever heard the saying “You know when you know?” Usually it pertains to love or finding ‘the one.’ Well, the same is with college, you have to find the one after so many choices but you will know when you know! 

1. Parsons, The New School of Design 

Programs: Fashion Design, Fashion studies, Fashion Marketing

Students: undergrads, 4,191; graduate, 555

Tuition: $38,510

Alumni: Donna Karan, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Narisco Rodriguez, Alexander Wang, Jason Wu, Jenna Lyons of J.Crew, Anna Sui, Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler, Prabal Gurung (only to name a few.)

Fun Fact: Parsons is an aspiring fashion designer’s dream! I’m sure you know of Marc Jacobs and Donna Karan and their amazing collections. Well, how would you like it if they were your teacher for a couple days? These events are common in the New York City’s best design school. They have collaborations with the fashion house LVMH. 

2. Fashion Institute of Technology

Programs: anything from fashion merchandising to media arts

Students: 10,386

Tuition: $5,168 for NYC residents, $13,550 out-of-state

Alumni: Reem Acra, Nina Garcia, Carolina Herrera, Michael Kors, Calvin Klein, Nanette Lepore

Fun Fact: I visited FIT in the Fall and it was an extremely impressive school. Your career after FIT is pretty much set up for you after you graduate. You will definitely leave will a job. 

3. Pratt

Programs: Fashion design

Students: 2,100

Tuition: $37,500

Alumni: Jeremy Scott, Betsey Johnson

Fun Fact: It is an up-and-coming design school located in Brooklyn, New York. It is part of a larger art school and is one of the few design programs that offer fashion editorializing and magazine publishing. 

4. Kent State University

Programs: Design and Merchandising 

Students: 18,000; 800 are fashion students

Tuition: Ohio resident: $9,030, for out-of-state, $16,900

Fun Fact: They have a garment center in NYC and is starting to become quite famous. They have a huge endowment, study abroad programs in Paris and Milan. You will be able to study fashion and get a full college experience. 

5. Academy of Art 

Programs: Fashion Design, Knitwear Design, Textile Design, Fashion Journalism and Fashion Merchandising and Marketing

Students: 17,000; 2,700 are fashion

Tuition: $17,760

Fun Fact: Located in sunny San Francisco and have a show in New York Fashion Week. 

6. The Savannah College of Art and Design 

Programs: Fashion design, Fashion Marketing and Management, Accessories Design

Students: 9,800; 940 fashion students

Tuition: $30,510

Fun Fact: Only school to have Luxury and Fashion Management program. And it’s not only a fashion school but, an excellent art college. Located in Savannah, Georgia.

7. Drexel Univeristy

Programs: Fashion Design, Design and Merchandising 

Students: 2,800 art and design students, 120 fashion students, 260 Design and Merchandising

Tuition: $39,700

Fun Fact: Philadelphia’s university also offers a sophomore year opportunity when you can study abroad in London School of Fashion, and many alumni have gotten successful jobs in France in their field. 

8. Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising 

Programs: Fashion Design, Footwear Design, Costume Design, Jewelry Design, Textile Design, Merchandising (Fashion & Beauty Programs)

Students: 8,000

Tuition: $27,000-$36,000 depending on area of study

Alumni: Monique Lhuillier, Pamela Skaist-Levy

Fun Fact: Los Angeles’s has beauty programs and is in the heart of the city of angels. 

9. California College of the Arts 

Programs: Fashion Design, Textiles, Jewelry Design 

Students: 1,640; 65 fashion students 

Tuition: $36,960

Fun Fact: This college has two locations; one in San Francisco and one in Oakland, California. This is a CFDA affiliated school and is known for their prestigious awards and the fashion world’s favoritism. 

10. Labratory Institute of Merchandising

Programs: International Business, Fashion Merchandising, Visual Merchandising, Marketing and Management 

Students: 1,508

Tuition: $23,070

Almuni: Rea Laccone, CEO of Vince 

Fun Fact: New York City’s college requires internships three out of the four years. Freshman and sophomore years required 300 hours of retail. They have several concentrations of many jobs that will be helpful in many fields. 

We live in a world where college admissions can either make or break us. There is no in between. Isn’t it sad? How we are raised solely for this moment? Years of education, all for this moment of disappointment. The moment we get rejected, there are no words that can console the heartache we feel. My question is: how did we come to create such a terrible system? How can we just accept it when students cry their heart and soul after reading a simple, “We regret to inform you,” followed by sentences about how competitive admissions are this year and how each application is carefully read and how there’s always spring quarter. Then they start going back and wondering what it is they possibly did wrong. Was it the topic? Grammar? A misunderstanding? To those who don’t understand, they’ll think it’s because those rejected students weren’t up to par with the “standards”. I’ll only say this: how can you tell a student who has poured their aspirations and struggles and life into a college application that they just weren’t good enough to be accepted into ABC college and that student XYZ is much more superior? It’s complete bullshit to me. How can we accept such generic phrases after writing so passionately that our blood meddled with the words of our personal statements? I hate this system of test scores and GPAs. There’s more to the fucking world than numbers. There’s more beyond a damn essay that probably only gets skimmed over. How can college admissions officers look for qualified students based on such limited information that may even be complete fabrications. Tell me how. How can we accept that students are tearing themselves apart over a rejection letter? Tell me why. Why is it deemed “normal” that I have friends bawling because of an education system that builds them up only to throw them overboard?

youtube

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhBwWYfKCO4)

This is sexual assault plain and simple. Horrific. Fuck those people.

anonymous asked:

So im a senior in hs and.. i still have no idea what i want to, what i want to study at uni, etc... and its starting to freak me out so badly because graduation comes closer and closer and i just have no clue what i will do after school. I'm so scared and anxious and everyday it just gets worse. Any tips?

you can go into college undeclared for now and just take your basic classes you’d have to take anyway in order to graduate!! i’d suggest taking those quizzes that tells you what career suits you, but also talk to ppl from different occupations that you find interesting and see what they’re really like!! you have time ok you do not have to have your entire future planned out now!!!!! just put yourself out there, talk to your parents, talk to your guidance counselor, talk to your teachers, and try to take it easy. 

instagram

VIDEO Series 5 of 5: The 21st Century #Muslim #Jihad BUT first let’s go back and learn the TRUTH about the #Christian Crusades vs #Arabian #Islamic #Jihads of the past …

PLEASE FOLLOW ME TO LEARN TRUTH AND BE BETTER PREPARED FOR EMERGENCY DISASTERS …

#Preppers #UrbanPreppers #CityPreppers and #LiberalPreppers WATCH & LISTEN TO THE FACTS STATED IN THIS Video Series, somehow the PUBLIC #Liberal run #Schools #Colleges #Universities are NOT QUESTIONING the Global Corporations that publish the history textbooks our #Children and #Millennials read & study from hence the BRAINWASHING or the White Washing of TRUE HISTORY …

I WANT TO STRESS TO EVERYONE, history will judge this period of time in my opinion as #Another #Islam Jihad. THIS time, THEY have been invited into the West by the treasonous Globalists who actually helped them get started, but what the #Jihadis don’t realize yet, it’s a doublecross…

Do I believe ALL Muslims want to kill the infidels (Non-believers) NO, they like having slaves and many wives, haha. SERIOUSLY NO I DON’T, but I HAVEN’T seen ANY INTERNATIONAL MUSLIM ORGANIZATION back by the PEACE loving Muslim Billionaires who have STRONGLY condemn the “Radicalization” or the New Jihad; have you? So if they were successful (NEVER WILL HAPPEN) even Muslims who didn’t participate in this NONSENSE still benefit from it, which means they are complicit …

WE REALLY LIVE IN INTERESTING TIMES for those who are AWAKE at least. #Arabs call #BlackPeople #Africans “Kafirs” as #Another word for “NWord” but they ALSO call WhitePeople “Kafirs” = Non-believers, which is REALLY funny too me. Most of these New Muslims are the most Racist, Sexist, Xenaphobic, #YouNameIt people on the face of the earth to them EVERYONE IS A NWORD, haha…

Why do you think the 6 most wealthiest Muslim countries (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates) haven’t taken ONE refugee? Are they in cahoots with the Globalists? Do you know that the Globalists have DIEASES that KILL by RACE? I got a feeling, we are ALL BEING PLAYED & USED AS PAWNS for the Great Reset COMING SOON!

(((#PreparednessAwareness)))
PreparednessAwareness.com

Made with Instagram