college & careers

ask-eren-plush  asked:

(Hi Momtaku, I have an ask about Erwin for you. If Erwin had a different job in our world, what would it be? Would Erwin be famous on a small scale or big scale? And do you think Levi, Hange and Mike would also be working with Erwin?)

Erwin was born with a pleasant personality, a curious mind, and a healthy dose of natural charisma  - all of which provide a solid foundation for future success. Being tall, handsome and male sure doesn’t hurt either. 

What I think would keep Erwin from heading down the traditional path of college and career is that he’s the sort to get fixated on an idea. Once that happens, he’d pursue it aggressively. He’d to see it to the end. He’d get it done or die trying. 

Because of that, I like the idea of Erwin accidentally finding a career or happening upon a place in society. I think that allows for any number of career paths, but I can’t see him being the typical teacher/professor/business man. There would likely be something unconventional and personal in his choice.

In our modern world, I could see him getting an idea for a product or technology and gambling everything he has to build it. Or seeing an injustice in society that he couldn’t ignore and working to resolve it.

I feel like his team would be small. No mega corporation. He’d know the names of everyone working for him. He’d choose people based on ability and not social norms or ideals. He’d be exactly the type to notice a bright secretary and promote them to project manager. Or see the quick and detailed mind of a kid in the mailroom and see if they couldn’t be used better elsewhere. He’d gain a great deal of loyalty that way.  So yes to the Hange, Levi and Mike’s of the world!

I don’t think any of this guarantees success. His level of dogged determination is just as likely to lead to spectacular failure. I feel like he’d have his share of both.

One of my friends from school was kidnapped this week by ICE

Cal State Los Angeles student Claudia Rueda taken by ICE this morning. Please mobilize and spread the word #FreeClaudia

“Early this morning, Border Patrol conducted a raid in Boyle Heights kidnapping Claudia Rueda outside her home in Boyle Heights, immigrant rights organizer with the Los Angeles Immigrant Youth Coalition and student at Cal State Los Angeles. Claudia most recently lead a campaign to free her mom, Teresa, from ICE detention after Border Patrol agents similarly kidnapped Teresa from their home.

When the officials showed up this morning, family members knew not to open the door since the agents couldn’t produce a warrant. But they got to Claudia anyway while she was outside moving the family’s car. For several hours her family had no idea where she was.

Claudia has lived in the US nearly her entire life. She participated in college-prep programs, was a student at UC Santa Cruz, and transferred to Cal State LA where she is currently studying Latin American Studies and has the support of many professors and campus organizations.Claudia has been preparing for apply for DACA but had been unable to gather the money for the filing fees.

Claudia’s best friend states: “Claudia is an extremely supportive, empowering, and hard working friend. All throughout high school, she encouraged students to continue their studies in higher education, becoming involved in afterschool programs like ESCALERA. Throughout our college career, she has continuously supported me, offered her home, and her wisdom to continue being a hardworking student and following our passions.”

Call Border Patrol in Chula Vista at 619-498-9750 to demand DHS not initiate removal proceedings and release Claudia to let her apply for DACA and get back to her family and completing finals.

“Hi, my name is ________________, and I am a concerned community member calling in support of Claudia Sarahi Rueda Vidal, DOB: 1/15/95, a DACA eligible youth, college student and beloved community member from Boyle Heights. Claudia has been a mentor in the community to other youth and has long fought for justice for others. I demand that Border Patrol release her to her family and community to let her apply for DACA with USCIS.”

FIGHT DEPORTATIONS BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY!
FIGHT ICE WITH FIRE!


*** this is a copy and paste from her group’s Facebook. Claudia was head of a group of people that collaborated with my MSA and BLACK student union as well as the transgender rights/undocumented students group TRUCHA at our school. This is clearly a targeted attack because of her activism. I desperately need everyone’s help in trying to free her.

7 Questions to Help you Find your Passion

1. What did you really love doing as a child? What did you seem to have a natural talent for?

2. What are you willing to do for free because it brings you satisfaction and fulfillment?

3. What sorts of things absorb your attention, and cause you to lose all sense of time?

4. Do you prefer to work with others, or by yourself?

5. Do you prefer order and structure, or do you prefer freedom, and the chance to be spontaneous?

6. What would you do, and where would you work, if someone told you they would finance your dream? Would you build a business? Travel? Spend it on yourself? Invest it in doing something meaningful for others?

7. If you were asked to picture the ideal life, what would it look like? What would be all the different aspects and components?

College Gothic
  • You are learning addition. You blink. There is differential calculus written on the whiteboard. The longer you stare, the less it looks like numbers. The sky is a different color than when you closed your eyes.
  • Your final grade has not been posted yet. It has been two days. Your final grade has not been posted yet. It has been a month. Your final grade has not been posted yet. It has been a year. Your final grade has not been posted yet.
  • You look at the posted list of required math credits for your major. It is not written in english. It is not written in any language you know. It is not written in any language you don’t know. You close the list of required math credits before it can look back.
  • You cannot remember a time before your 8 AM. You leave the auditorium only to find yourself back in the auditorium. It is time for class. 
  • You have had the same advisor your entire college career. Every time you see him, he has more teeth. Eventually, you stop seeing your academic advisor. He still sees you.
  • Students that go to look through the reference section of the library return different. The unlucky ones don’t return at all.
  • You go to a school of 20,000 students. You see the same 10 individuals at random points on campus every day. There are 19,989 other students. You’re not sure if you want to know where they are.
  • People are screaming in your dorm. People are always screaming in your dorm. “Somebody must be going out partying,” your roommate says. You both know that isn’t true. 
  • You have a paper due in four days. You never finish it. The deadline never draws any closer. You have a paper due in four days. 
  • A man sitting alone on the snowy, empty quad tells you that you will die in exactly 47 minutes. You walk away. You glance back, from a distance, and see only your footprints. You walk faster.
  • The squirrels fear no one. You do not make eye contact with the squirrels. They grow bolder every year, graduating from stealing trash to stealing food off of your plate. You shudder to think what they will steal next. 
  • There is always someone in the study room. You have never seen them leave. It is always the same person. You have never seen them anywhere else.
  • Greek Town gets larger every time you pass it. There are houses with letters that aren’t in any alphabet you know. The residents have hollow eyes. A baby emerald sleeps here. You don’t know what it means. You don’t think you want to know.
A Guide to Writing Your Resume

I recently took a very helpful youth professional development course and learned some great things I’d love to share with everyone. This post will be especially helpful for first time resume writers, but there might be something in it for everyone. 

1. What is a Resume? 

A resume is a brief summary of your abilities, experience, and skills. It’s essentially a personal advertisement for your professional career, an opportunity to convince the employer that you are worth interviewing. 

  • The average employer will only take about 15-20 seconds to read your resume.
  • It’s important that your resume is neat so the reader can find important information quickly. 
  • Limit the resume to one page. 
  • Standard font size is 11-12, but you can play with the font or margins to fit everything. 

2. Headings 

  • Start with your personal information at the top of the first page (name, address, phone number, and email address). 
  • Keep the header centered and your name on top in BIG LETTERS.

3. Education 

  • If you are still in school or have little professional experience, this will likely be the first section in your resume. 
  • Document your education and graduation year.
  • Include the location (city, state), but do not include the school address. 
  • If you attend a school with a College Preparatory Curriculum, you may list that as a bullet underneath. If you are taking Honors or AP classes (or an international equivalent), feel free to list that as well. 

4. Professional Experience 

  • List your work experience in reverse chronological order - start with your most recent experience, and work backwards. 
  • Include the employer name, city, state, and position title for each. Again, no addresses.
  • Record your dates of employment consistently, using a format like June 2016 - August 2015, or 6/15 - 8/15. Staying consistent will make your resume professional. 
  • Place current jobs in the present tense, past jobs in the past tense. 
  • Write short phrases, not full sentences (”performed experiments”, not “I performed experiments”). Start each description with an action word that describes your skills, responsibilities, or accomplishments. 
  • Make sure you are specific about your responsibilities and don’t undersell yourself!

5. Skills 

  • Most commonly listed skills are computer programs and softwares you are comfortable with, and languages you are fluent/proficient in. 
  • Be honest! If you say you’re fluent in Spanish and you’re not, but your employer hires you for your Spanish abilities…. someone isn’t going to be pleased. 
  • List skills that are relevant to your job - patience might be a good skill for working with children, while organized might be more suitable for an office setting. 

6. Honors & Awards/Extracurriculars

  • List any honors or awards you have earned, including a brief explanation if the nature of the award is unclear. 
  • List any activities that you have been involved in, making sure to include years of participation (again, be consistent with formatting). These can be in-school or outside-of-school activities.

7. General & Miscellaneous

  • Some safe fonts: Times New Roman, Garamond, Calibri, or Book Antiqua.
  • Make sure your email is professional! This has been repeated to death but it’s so, so, so important. 
  • Likewise, if you list your personal cellphone number, make sure your voicemail message is appropriate. When in doubt, just revert back to the standard voicemail greeting. 

I hope this was helpful for anyone just starting out with their resume. Please share this for those who need it. Best of luck! 

- Ellie 

3

The 10 best and worst college majors for women trying to avoid the gender pay gap

  • American women earn less on average than men — about $400,000 less over the course of a career
  • But figuring why and how that gap arises is the subject of great debate: Do women earn less than men because of discrimination on the job? Or are women socially conditioned to study fields that feed into lower paying careers? Is it both, or other factors?
  • At least the result is clear, said Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at jobs site Glassdoor: On average, “men and women end up in different jobs,” he said, “And college major is really the biggest factor there.” Read more (4/19/17)

You know what the world needs? Lawyers who understand immigration and institutional barriers. Lawyers who understand feminism. Lawyers who have a background in business and marketing and can revamp the legal business model.

In short, go to be Elle Woods. Study what you love, and make yourself a better lawyer than all those political science majors who never thought there was an option outside the box.

It’s officially been a year since I graduated from college as a chemical engineer and yet I haven’t done all the things that I thought I would have. That is exactly how life works, you think that finding a job won’t be hard, you’ll be a working professional in a big shot company just because you are an engineer, you think everything will be provided to you easily but all those things don’t happen. They don’t happen because they are not meant to happen, if getting a degree required years of work and effort then why will anything afterwards to be any different. I’m saying this in the most optimistic and positive way for people just graduating, know everything takes time. Getting your degree took time then why won’t finding a job a take time. Yes, some majors are more challenging than others and they end up paying more but you won’t find that dream job on day 1️⃣ And you won’t be where you had planned in the next year and that it is completely OK to be in that position. You’re not alone and you won’t be stuck here forever either😌 On that note, congrats to all the new graduates 🎓

Things I have learned by joining the local Methodist Church’s coffee & knitting circle (where I am the only person under 60 years old):

  • How to double knit very, very quickly
  • Mrs. Jonson on the third pew won’t mind her own business, bless her heart. And she buys her pies pre-made for all the church functions.
  • Ways that women cheated the system in 1950s Texas to get into college and start careers. Including a memorable “He told me I wouldn’t last a week, but then 6 years later, I had to let him go because his production was way down.” *drinks sip of coffee*
  • We Might Be Conservative But Gosh Darn That Trump Bless His Heart He Doesn’t Know Anything About God Or Texas
  • And On That Note, God And Texas Are The Only Good Things Left In The World. Erin Write That Down.
  • How to rescue a dropped stitch and make it look like it never happened
  • Public schools and inclusive, desegregated education will single-handedly save the world
  • Sharing recipes is a sacred bonding and community-building tradition that rivals the greatest political negotiations and land deals in history
  • “It’s better that you prefer girls honey, the Boyfriend Curse doesn’t apply to your girlfriend and a lovin’ god’ll keep on a-lovin. You better make that girl a sweater.’” 
    • (Boyfriend Curse = knit a sweater for a boy and he’ll leave you when you finish it)
  • Mrs. Barbara’s husband cheated in ‘76, resulting in a divorce. She thought it was the end of the world because her youth had already passed, but now she’s an engineer and married to a kind, good man who she met when she went back to college in ‘79.
  • “The only things you can trust in are God, your good sense, and the wisdom of those older women you grew up admiring. The rest is crap.”
Things I wish I knew at 18

1. High school friendships don’t last.
Not the way you want them to anyway.
Even if you swam oceans of pain together.
Even if you never wanted to drift apart.
Friendships fall apart.
Most times they sadly do.

2. Your parents will still treat you like a child. They don’t care about your legal reality. When you’re with them, they still see you as their baby. That can get frustrating but also comforting.

3. Your undergrad degree won’t matter as much as you think it will. So choose what you want to explore. Don’t choose something you think is going to be your career. Chances are when you graduate you will be doing something completely different than what you were dead sure of when you started college.
Explore.

4. People are more selfish now. People are more broken now. People are more cautious now. Everyone has been through something that haunts them.

5. Everyone is suffering. Some will use that as an excuse to mistreat you. Some will because of that very reason be there for you in your suffering in anyway they can. Most times it’s hard to tell which person you’re being. Don’t be an ass.

6. Not everyone makes life long friends in college. You won’t. That’s okay. Nothing good comes out of forceful relations anyway. It can get lonely but at least that kind of loneliness isn’t because of shitty company.

7. Grades. Internships. Extra curricular activities. They matter. Everyone acts like it doesn’t but it does. Whatever choice you make, whatever your course may be, how you perform does matter. It isn’t everything but it matters.

8. Self care isn’t boring or unnecessary. It’s important. It’s hard but it’s crucial.
You don’t have to click pictures for aesthetics or share your progress. You can if it helps. But you don’t have to. Because that’s secondary. You know what’s primary. Do it.

9. Just because you become an adult by a number and are recognized as one because of law doesn’t mean you aren’t you anymore.
The way you are at 17 years 364 days, is the way you will remain at 18. Perhaps 19.
That’s okay.
There’s a lot learn. You may have fought and conquered adolescence but this is a completely different story. There are new skills and lessons to be learned. All previous ones may not necessarily remain valid.

10. You genuinely have to learn to let go.
Imagine your life to be a tiny box. A box that fits in your palm. If that box is full of past pain, regret and disappointments, of all the people who broke you, of negativity and dried blood, all the good things and beautiful people that are to come into your life will fall right off because there just isn’t enough space in that box. It is full of everything you don’t need or deserve.
Good things will come your way, they will fall into your hands but you still won’t be happy if you don’t remember to take out the trash.

Don’t ever tell me that marching band isn’t important.

I have had so many problems with public schools putting all the emphasis on athletics. When a school’s budget is cut, they don’t choose to take a little from each program. No. They choose to completely eradicate the arts programs, usually starting with the marching band. If you don’t play sports, you’re not a valuable asset, you’re not qualified for scholarships, and you mean nothing. Marching band? Why would we be impressed that you’re in marching band?

Anyone can do that.

Okay, fine. Anyone can do marching band. Anyone can spend hours on the field doing the same forty-second section over and over and over and over. Anyone can hit over 75 precise dots on the field with the correct step sizes, the correct amount of steps, the correct timing, without being so much as an inch to either side, in order and without looking at the yard line markers or the field. Anyone can memorize all of those extremely specific points on the grass and varying counts for steps and then execute them with a shako visor pulled down over your eyes and looking up at the press box the whole time. If you look down at the yard line markers to see where you are, congratulations, you just lost points for the group.

Anyone can memorize eight pages of notes, rhythms, dynamics, phrasing, and tempos. (But of course, before you do that you have to learn an instrument with hundreds of different fingerings and learn how to make slight changes in your lips to change notes and stay in tune.) Memorize all seven and a half minutes of music and then marry it to the seventy-five pages of drill you memorized. Do them both perfectly and at the same time. But you can’t just do what you memorized. You have to do it in perfect sync with everyone around you and know how to make the slightest adjustments to fit perfectly within the group. If you’re an inch to the right or barely a thousandth of a step sharp, it’ll throw everything off.

But anyone can do that.

Then add in the fact that you don’t get any individual credit for doing this. The closest you’ll come to recognition is your identity lumped into “The Such-and-Such Marching Band” as you all march onto the field looking exactly the same. You don’t have a number on your back. You have a uniform intended to erase you and turn you into dot T14 and nothing more.

But, for some reason you can’t explain, you love it. You love throwing everything you have into this ridiculously precise pursuit and then not getting any credit for it. You start thanking people when they call you a band geek. You start taping pictures of marching bands into your locker. You start wearing your band shirt everywhere you go. Because you look at the person in an identical uniform next to you and you know that you’ve done this for them and they’ve done this for you. This is more than just a team, this is a family; and if one person is missing from the form, the show can’t ever be the same. 

It costs so much money, so much time. You’re out there on the field in the blazing sun for fourteen hours a day during summer band camp, out in the street getting frostbite on your fingertips during the holiday parade. If anyone knew what you went through for this, they would wonder what made it all worth it.

And the truth is, what makes it all worth it cannot be described. It’s the camaraderie between you and the center snare, the colorguard newbie, the tenor sax player in the set in front of you. It’s the sunset behind you lighting up the back of your plume. It’s the hazy nostalgia that racks your chest with emotion. There’s something about the family you’ve chosen and the experience you’ve internalized that gives you the passion to throw everything down onto that field like nothing else matters in the world… because in that moment, it’s true. 

Your nerves are damaged from the cold. Your skin is damaged from the sun. Your joints are damaged from marching and marching and marching. You’re physically and mentally drained, your body is irreversibly compromised, you’re broke as hell, and all you have to show for it is a polyester jacket and a couple of blurry photographs.

But sports are what require hard work and dedication, not marching band.

Even though you complained basically the entire time you marched and even though you’re done with it, you pull out those photographs and you remember. You remember your first day of high school band camp when you had absolutely no idea what you were getting yourself into. You remember your first final retreat when they announced your band’s name as state champions, and you wanted to cry with happiness but you weren’t allowed to move, so you just clenched your fists so tight that your fingernails dug white crescents into your palms. You remember coming back the next year and thinking you knew everything as a sophomore, only to realize there was still so much to learn. You remember the band trips you spent months fundraising for, all the lame tourist attractions you visited between performances, and how you wouldn’t trade those memories for all the money in the world. You remember being a junior and getting nervous because people looked up to you now: as an upperclassman, as a section leader, as a friend. And then you were a senior and you cried on the final day of band camp. You remember how your life became a series of lasts. You had to decide which of the freshmen would inherit your band cubby, your lucky bottle of valve oil, your bus seat. You went to graduation but it didn’t mean anything because you still had one last band trip coming up. You didn’t shed a tear when you tossed your cap but you cried like a child after your last parade. You remember on the plane ride home, you expected to feel devastated and heartbroken, but you just felt… empty.

You remember printing out what seemed like the most difficult solo in the world. You remember driving up to your college and entering a room with a chair and a stand and a couple of people giving you skeptical looks. You remember getting an email from the college marching band with your audition results and reading it with tears of joy in your eyes because you realized it was starting all over again.

But marching band doesn’t mean anything. It doesn’t matter.

Tell me that it doesn’t matter. Tell me as many times as you want. You could scream it in my face and I still wouldn’t hear because the music we’re making is too damn loud to let anything else in. 

Tell me that it doesn’t matter when I’m standing on the field for the last time, knowing that everything behind me will last forever and that nothing will ever mean more to me than this… and all you’ve got is some money and a jersey with a number on the back.

Do not ever tell me that marching band isn’t important. It is everything to me, and it is everything to millions of other band geeks across the world.

When you refuse to support kids because they participate in the arts rather than athletics, you’re no better than the football player who takes lunch money from nerds.

To all of my fellow band geeks… keep marching, even if the world tells you it’s not worth it. It is. God, it is worth it, in ways no one else but you will ever understand. Continue your band career in college. Audition for a drum corps. Stay active in your high school band as an alumnus supporter. You are all my family. 

6 Tips for Time Management 

Time management is the death of procrastination. It’s the key to success. The ability to manage time right will make you a successful individual in all aspects of life. 

I came up with some tips based on my experience to improve your time management skills. They overlap and depend on each other, so read the whole thing to understand me better c:

1. Organize your due dates. 

Planners or calendars will do the job. I like the calendar in my email app because it sends me notifications and I can access it from any device. You can read more information about the organization in my previous post.

2. Plan your day. 

This is very important. As a student or a professional, we always have to know what is going on today so we don’t miss anything. 

What I usually do: 

I look at my schedule and calendar in the morning or the night before and decide what I need to do today. You can write down everything you need to do. Personally, I almost never write to-do lists because I keep everything in my head (I forget things sometimes though, so it’s not the best way). I feel like I do more from my “list” if I don’t write it down. Weird… I know! 

What I also do, I set up an order of the things I need to get done in my head. The order is important because this way you do things more efficiently and save time. For example: if you have an hour break first and a 20 minutes break second, complete a longer assignment first and the shorter one second. It’s common sense, but when you don’t keep things like this in mind, you miss them, and then you regret.

3. Start in advance. 

That’s easier said than done. When I was a freshman I would procrastinate for days and then I would pull an all-nighter the night before. I would stress so much that I would literally cry. After my first semester, I understood that things can’t keep on like this. It’s just not healthy and you don’t learn anything.

Keep up with you planner/calendar and try to finish your work several days before you have to submit it. 

4. Use your waiting time.

Being a junior I have huge gaps in between classes. My first online class really taught me how to use this precious time. I would work on assignments or online tests while waiting for my next class. I love doing this because when I come home I usually don’t have any homework left, and I can watch as many shows as I want! 

5. Prioritize your assignments

We’ve all been in the situation when we have so much to do but not enough time for everything. In cases like this, do assignments worth more points first, and the easier assignments second.  This way you can reduce the damage. And next time start doing homework in advance to avoid cases like this. 

6. Rest only if you need it not because you're being lazy

This is a huge one! At least for me. I’m a very lazy person and I hate it, however, I found a way to partially overcome this. When I wanna go have some rest and do my own thing, I check my imaginary to-do list for what’s left in it. If I have something left, I complete it. If I don’t have anything I would go clean around the apartment, and then I can rest. This system requires high self-control and motivation. My motivation is 4.0 GPA and thinking that I’ll stress less if do it now. You need to find your motivation.  Also, it’s way more rewarding if you relax after you’re done with all your work rather than when you have a boatload of stuff to do.  Of course, I have lazy days, no one is perfect. I can only let myself being lazy when I know I don’t have homework or exams so I don’t fail anything.

Procrastination is not cool or funny; it won’t build your career and bring you money. Only hard work will. 

anonymous asked:

AU where Bitty and Jack both suddenly wake up, after having had a few years together, and find themselves in their beds on the morning of the day they met. Both remember everything that happened, but neither thinks the other does, so they both pretend not to remember (which only complicates things more). They end up reenacting a lot of their interactions and it kills them both to do things they know hurt the other but they don't want to change anything.

oh no buddy, I’m not gonna let this stay sad. I’m gonna draw attention to several sad things, but then I’m gonna fix it.

******************

Bitty wakes up on his first day of freshman year. Again. He quickly decides that he can’t say anything to anyone. There was no way to prove that the life he had just been living was anything but a dream.

He goes through the motions as well as he can remember. If he lingers a little on the handshake when he ‘meets’ Jack again, well, who could notice a thing like that?

Jack wakes up in the Haus. He mirrors Bitty’s mental process, realizing that if he started talking about this he could lose the future he knows is on its way. He searches Bittle’s face for recognition, but is too afraid to say anything.

Jack takes a deep breath every day and snaps at Bittle, pushing every pet name out of his mind. Bitty forces himself to forget and relearn how to take a check. On the rink together for checking practice, neither can think of any way to ask if they’re going through the same thing. They both cry more than they did the first time around.

Sometimes Bitty just gets angry at having to repeat things. He tries as hard as he can to not mess the repetitions up, but he isn’t perfect. When Ransom and Holster start asking him what his type is, he rolls his eyes and replies “Men.” As soon as he’s said it he remembers that he had only said that later to his camera, but the damage doesn’t seem to be too great. Jack doesn’t seem to react to the change, adding to his mental list of evidence that everything else had just been a dream. He gets the list of eligible Winter Screw options a few days earlier, but everything settles back to what it had been within a week. Whenever he starts thinking about the next few years, he’s enraged about everything he’s going to have to sit back and let happen. Everything that was going to make Jack sad, and that he wouldn’t be able to fix. Everything that was going to hurt him that he couldn’t avoid. 

Jack wakes up every day and writes up a game plan. It’s hard to have to turn back years of learning and be worse as a captain, especially when he remembers every mistake he made in every lost game. So he writes down those mistakes as a reminder to himself to make them. Half of the mistakes are emotional, and that’s what really gets him. He’s forced to act like those years of growing as a person never happened, like they were worthless. He hates trying to make himself glare at Bittle when they’re on the same line, he hates telling him that it was a lucky shot, he hates being so close to his boyfriend except for the fact that he isn’t his boyfriend yet.

Then it’s the playoffs. Bitty steels himself all week for the concussion he knows is coming. It crosses his mind to try to avoid it, to spare himself the pain and potential brain damage. But he remembers that it was only after the concussion that Jack started texting him, and they really got close. He knows that if he went against the play he knew Jack was going to suggest, he’d only drive them apart. Besides, it hadn’t been that bad the first time.

Jack is confident he can find another reason to text Bittle over the summer. He’s thought about this for the whole school year. Whatever consequences could come from not seeing Bitty hurt like that would be worth it. He just has to convince the coaches to not put Bitty in at the wrong time. 

“Oh my god, I thought we got over this months ago,” Bitty mutters to himself. He doesn’t remember Jack getting so annoyed about playing with him during this game, but he’s at a point where everything has run together in his mind. 

“Jack, I’ll be fine,” he half-lies. He will, eventually. There’s something close to panic in Jack’s eyes. Weird, Jack had taken so long the first time around to show any tiny sign of weakness.

“Promise me you’ll avoid number three.” This is definitely different from before. Bitty stares at Jack. “Spencer, number three, don’t go near him when he’s on their side of the rink. Promise me, Bits.”

“You didn’t even call me Bitty at this point,” he says in shock. They stare at each other for a minute, eyes wide. 

“I won’t get the concussion this time and we’ll talk about this after the game,” Bitty blurts out. Jack nods vigorously. They play, and it’s brutal, but Bitty avoids the hip check. Once the game is over, they rush to get seats together in the bus. In whispers, they talk about the future they already had. Bitty mourned the years of school he had ahead of him that he had already completed. Jack complained about having to rewalk a long path to the Stanley Cup. They talked about teammates who felt like family but would still know them as strangers. Graduation, the Fourth of July they spent in Madison, their first Christmas together. Every important milestone of their relationship.

“And in this loop or timeline or whatever, we haven’t even kissed!” Bitty whispers, letting his head thunk back against the headrest. “I was at the point where I was out of college, happy with my career, and hiding a ring from you!”

“You weren’t!” Jack says out loud before dropping back into a whisper. “I was doing the same thing.” They both start laughing. It’s the perfect time to have a second first kiss. They lean in towards each other, their lips meet, and–

–They’re back in their apartment. Bitty sits bolt upright in their bed and turns to Jack. For a fleeting second, he thinks about pretending the last several months just didn’t happen. Jack sits up too, and their eyes meet.

“Did that just–”

“Your frog year take two–” They dissolve into relieved laughter.

“I thought I was going to have to take calc again!”

“I thought I was going to have to listen to you complain about calc again,” Jack says before Bitty smacks him with a pillow. “Kidding! Kind of! Wait, weren’t we just saying that we wanted to propose to each other?” He throws himself out of bed and runs to start rummaging through various coat pockets.

“Oh no, you’re not going to propose to me before I can propose to you!” 

Everything is as it should be once more.