collective-quarterly

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Collective Quarterly: Mad River.

I was recently sent a copy of Collective Quarterly, a new magazine devoted to design and discovery.  It’s so awesome that I felt like sharing it with all of you.  Each issue highlights a single location focusing on artists, food, music and special peculiarities that make it one of a kind.  Their latest issue, “Mad River,” focuses on Vermont’s Mad River Valley where topics range from German refugees to a woman who forges knives from horse hooves.  Definitely check it out if you get a chance.

Meeting new people and starting new collaborations is one of the most exciting things I can think of, and these folks are no exception. I’ve recently been collaborating with the Collective Quarterly, a new publication started by the talented designer Jesse Lenz in collaboration with Seth Putnam and Jay Gullion. So looking forward to what comes out of this meeting of the minds. Be on the look out for it! Here’s a bit about it:

It follows select artists and artisans on a trip to the unseen hideaways that inspire them to craft uncommon goods. The camera lens brings into focus an often blurry creative process as they work alongside each other to discover truth, surprise and an aesthetic that delights. In these pages, you’ll find a carefully edited selection of dry goods, art, music, food, drink and stories, all deeply rooted in the heritage and land around us. 

This journey hinges on a communion of likeminded creators. We are illustrators, photographers and writers.
 We are shirt-makers, boot-crafters and denim-cutters. We are bartenders, chefs and musicians.

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Collective Quarterly is a magazine about creating. Following select artists and artisans on trips to unexpected places, Collective Quarterly brings together illustrators, photographers, writers, and craftsmen to cover a carefully edited selection of dry goods, art, music, food, drink, and stories, rooted deeply in the heritage and land around us. 

This town, with its 2,121 residents, is a phenomenon. Tired of the “scene” in New York City, artist Donald Judd made Marfa his home in 1971. Since then, an artists’ colony has sprouted. Many of us grew up in rural regions of the U.S., wishing our neighbors understood our creative impulses. It’s mind-blowing to find such a vibrant community of artists in the small-town setting we know so well.

Presidio County is rugged. Sitting in the shadow of the Davis Mountains, and with Big Bend National Park just down the road, the land itself is a magnet for us. We couldn’t think of a more appropriate place to kick off a magazine devoted to exploring and creating. Above all, we come with curious minds, ready to learn Marfa’s stories and soak up its inspiration.

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Collective Quarterly is a magazine about creating. Following select artists and artisans on trips to unexpected places, Collective Quarterly brings together illustrators, photographers, writers, and craftsmen to cover a carefully edited selection of dry goods, art, music, food, drink, and stories, rooted deeply in the heritage and land around us.

When you cross the border into Vermont from any of the three states and one country that surround it, you’ll notice something peculiar: no billboards.

Where giant advertisements typically loom along the highway, you’ll see only towering sugar maples and an indefinite repetition of peaks and valleys as you make your way up, up, up into the high places of the Green Mountain State. “Flatlanders,” as true Vermonters call those from away, are understandably enchanted by the place’s virgin beauty. They arrive in droves each fall to watch the leaves turn from emerald green to the hues of a flickering flame. They come for the quaintness quotient: the maple syrup, the fresh-pressed apple cider, and the corn mazes.

But there are bizarre pockets to be found in this autumnal haven. Everywhere we went, we kept bumping into the idea of failure. It was not, however, something to be feared. Instead, the mindset was as Irish playwright Samuel Beckett once said: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

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