collard greens

Recipes for a Southern Sunday 

After re-watching Forks Over Knives recently, I was reminded of how good I had been eating the past five years and how poorly I’ve been eating the past few months. You can even see it in my last few articles. Never would I have promoted so much sugar, oil, and processed food when I first started Cheap Vegan back in 2012.

I’m purposefully documenting it on here because I want people to see that even someone who has been vegan for 12 years and eating a Whole Foods Plant-Based diet for 5 years, is still very capable of slipping into the convenience of processed food, sugar, and caffeine. They taste good and are literally addictive, but even though it takes more work, in the long run it feels even better to make the right choices for our bodies.

So this Sunday I did what I always advise others to do: I went to the farmers market when it was closing down, bought $1 produce from someone trying to get rid of their excess, and I made a delicious meal out of my findings, big enough that I would have left overs for at least part of the week.

4-5 servings only cost me about

<$1 – Rice (from a giant bag)
$1 – Bunch of Collard Greens from Farmers Market
$.75 – onion
<$1 – garlic cloves
<$1 – Veggie Bouillon
<$.50 – 2 Celery Stalks
$1 – Green Pepper
$2 – 2 cans of beans
~$1.75 – 8 Sweet Potatoes (Trader Joes)

TOTALLING OUT TO APPROX: $10!!! That’s only about $2 a meal! And here’s how you make your own Southern Sunday:

RICE
-1.5 cups of brown rice

Put 1 part rice to 2 parts water in rice cooker and turn on.
(You may want to add a little extra water because brown rice is a little more dense)

GREENS
-½ onion
-3 cloves garlic
-1 Vegetable Bouillon cube or Vegetable Broth (adjust to taste)
- about 12 leaves of Collard Greens

1. Dice the onions very fine and chop the garlic very thick.
2. Wash and remove stems of collard greens, then cut into 1″x1″ squares.
3. Sautee the onions and garlic at a low heat until clear.
4. Add a little less than an inch of water with the cube of bouillon or just broth.
5. Once this is simmering, add collards to your rich oniony broth. Make sure you like this flavor because this is how your collards will taste. Adjust accordingly.
6. Mix collards in with broth for about 1 minute then remove from heat. You don’t want to over-cook the greens and you definitely don’t want to boil them.

BEANS
-½ onion
-2 stalks celery
-¼ bouillon cube (to taste)
-½ cup of green pepper (I actually used green poblano pepper for this one)
-2 cans of red or pinto beans

1. Dice the onions, celery, and peppers very fine and sautee at a low heat until onions are clear. 
2. Add beans and bouillon cube until everything is evenly mixed together.
3. (optional) Transfer to oven for a more robust flavor and smooth texture. Add small amount of water and cover if beans become too dry for your liking. 

SWEET POTATOES
-Sweet Potatoes

1. Wash and cut sweet potatoes into 1″ thick pieces.
2. Oil pan to prevent sticking and place in the oven at 350degrees.
3. Add small amount of water and cover with foil if sweet potatoes become too dry.

Viola! You have a soulful meal ready to eat and re-heat for the rest of the work week! Best part is, all of these dishes can be mixed and matched to eat in different ways throughout the week. Rice can be used for a stir fry. Beans can be used for Mexican. Sweet Potatoes can be mashed. Or Collards can be eaten with whole wheat pasta!

If you wanna see how I did it, check out my snap story below!

10

Whole Foods tweeted about collard greens — and Twitter wasn’t pleased

On Thursday, Whole Foods suggested to its almost 5 million followers they start cooking collard greens, with a puzzling image choice. Twitter had a few words (and a lot of memes) for Whole Foods, about not only the perhaps “gentrification” of collard greens — but what they put in it.