cob home

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A lot of positive things have happened this week. And receiving a house from the community we’ll be living in is one of them. 

As you guys may or may not know, my fiancé and I are moving into an eco community in South Africa that is very much focused on sustainability, off-grid living and restoring our own connection with Mother Nature by nurturing the land through permaculture and fruit forests🌳 🌿 My fiancé moved there on Monday and he was able to start clearing thick vegetation off a plot of land for our home and garden. But the owner and and homesteaders of Khula Dhamma decided that it would be better for us to move on the main hill of KD so we can work closely together with the owner. So, we were lucky enough to receive it. The house has been left in pretty good condition by the previous homesteaders. It’s very strong and sturdy, just needs some patching up to do on the walls. Obviously, the house needs to undergo some(!) refurbishment. I do not want to begin about the aesthetics of the place… it needs some work. BADLY!🙄  So we’ll be fixing up the place accordingly and will make it look suiting our tastes. 

The house is attached to a borehole so that is where we will be getting our water supply from and is heated by a rocket stove. The solar panels will hopefully be installed soon after I arrive. As soon as some cracks have been filled, a lime plaster will cover both outer and inner walls. Before all of that, the thick vegetation has to be cleared and the house needs to be cleaned thoroughly. 

The house as two upper floors. Our bedroom will be on the first and then there is a loft area for guests. The two big windows in our room overlook lush, green forests of the eco community. The garden has extreme fertile soil which helps us a lot. Now we only have to focus on maintaining the fertile soil when growing our food🍌 🍊 🍠🍐 🍎

I can not begin to express how blessed I feel for receiving all of these gifts from the universe. I’ve always wished, hoped and desired to live an off-grid lifestyle in an awesome place and here we are.. I don’t know how I manifested all of this but I am extremely grateful for believing I could live this kind of lifestyle🌞

Cob Houses - Live Debt Free with Sustainable Development  

Search for step by step videos on how to make a cob wall and cob homes from inexpensive materials or materials already in your backyard.  You do not need a 30 year debt, to pay your home many times over, in order to live in a fabulous home that can outlast stick built homes by hundreds of years when kept dry and well maintained. 

9

I’ve seen this house a few times online/in books but none have been photographed as well to capture the interior. Good ol’ Air BnB! :)

There are many aspects of this Cob House I like - as my general goal is to create an almost “modernist” take on Cob…stepping away from the “Hobbity” vibe we see so often.


dailymail.co.uk
Farmer builds a house for just £150 using materials he found in skips
Michael Buck, 59, used only natural materials or unwanted items to build the 'cob house' (pictured) at the bottom of his garden in the Oxfordshire countryside.
Michael Buck used only natural materials or unwanted items to build ‘cob house’ at bottom of his garden

He said he wanted to challenge the notion that paying for a house should take a lifetime

This cottage cost just £150 to build, using only natural or reclaimed materials.

And with no mains electricity, gas or water, the bills don’t come to much either.

Below: Thatched roof: Former art teacher Mr Buck taught himself how to thatch in order to create the cottage’s intricate roof

Natural materials: Mr Buck said that a house ‘does not have to cost the Earth - you only need earth to build it’.

‘I wanted to show that houses don’t have to cost anything. We live in a society where we spend our lives paying our mortgages, which many people don’t enjoy.’

Mr Buck originally aimed to build the house for nothing, but miscalculated the amount of straw needed so had to buy more. He also had to buy nails to keep the thatch attached.