coal sack

Have you ever seen the Southern Cross? This famous constellation is best seen from Earth’s Southern Hemisphere. Captured from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the four bright stars that mark the Southern Cross are visible just above the horizon in the featured image. On the left of this constellation, also known as The Crux, is the orange star Gamma Crucis. The band of stars, dust, and gas rising through the middle of the image mosaic is part our Milky Way Galaxy. Just to the right of the Southern Cross is the dark Coal Sack Nebula, and the bright nebula at the top of the image is the Carina Nebula. The Southern Cross is such a famous constellation that it is depicted on the national flag of Australia.

Object Names: Southern Cross

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Carlos Fairbairn

Time And Space

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Dark Emu and Scorpius Rising by Alan Dyer
Via Flickr:
The Dark Emu of aboriginal sky lore rising in the east at the OzSky 2016 star party at Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia, on April 2, 2016. The sweep of the Milky Way from Carina at upper right to Sagittarius at lower left just rising takes in much of the splendours of the southern sky. The Dark Emu itself is made of dark lanes in the Milky Way, with the dark Coal Sack at upper centre forming his head and beak. The dark lane through Centaurus forms his neck. At left is Scorpius rising, with Mars and Saturn to the left of Antares. The Small Magellanic Cloud is at lower right setting. The Zodiacal Band and Gegenschein add the brighter sky at upper left. This is a stack of 5 x 3-minute exposures, all tracked on the iOptron Sky Tracker, and with the 14mm Rokinon lens at f/2.8 and filter modified Canon 5D MkII at ISO 2000. The ground comes from one 8-minute exposure at ISO 800 with the tracker motor off taken right after the tracked shots. This provides the sharp foreground, with a photographer with the OzSky star party at lower right. The composite does leave some ghosly trailed trees at left and along the horizon. But I think this looks rather neat.

The Southern Cross in a Southern Sky : Have you ever seen the Southern Cross? This famous constellation is best seen from Earth’s Southern Hemisphere. Captured from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the four bright stars that mark the Southern Cross are visible just above the horizon in the featured image. On the left of this constellation, also known as The Crux, is the orange star Gamma Crucis. The band of stars, dust, and gas rising through the middle of the image mosaic is part our Milky Way Galaxy. Just to the right of the Southern Cross is the dark Coal Sack Nebula, and the bright nebula at the top of the image is the Carina Nebula. The Southern Cross is such a famous constellation that it is depicted on the national flags of Australia and New Zealand. via NASA

js
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A Great Big Slab of Night Sky: Eta Carina, Running Chicken, Coal Sack Southern Cross, Jewel Box and the Two Pointers - April 18, 2007 by Joseph Brimacombe
Via Flickr:
Taken from Erldunda Station with a Canon 20D camera and F/1.2 85-mm lens at F/3.5 on a Losmondy G11 Mount. Ten frames; each frame 5 x 5 min stacked images.