co housing

“Are we gonna eat, or do I got to be a king to get some food around here?”

I still think there were undertones of jealousy in Daryl’s little joke. Of course, not by any means was this jealousy in the possessive, claiming, stereotypical sense because that is not Daryl. I don’t mean jealousy in the sense that he thinks of Carol as his, but clearly he cares about her in a way that the thought of her having dinner with Ezekiel is on his mind, pricking at him. Richard told him that Ezekiel brings Carol food, he most likely saw the King and co. at Carol’s house before knocking on her door - and even in the midst of everything, this sticks in Daryl’s head. 

Obviously, by making that comment he was trying to lighten the mood, get Carol to laugh, and that’s what it was about. But I just don’t believe that Daryl would be shown to be thinking about something as trivial as Ezekiel eating dinner with Carol, if he simply loves her in a familial way. Though Daryl’s motive in making that “joke” was clearly him wanting to make Carol stop crying, if TPTB were not trying to convey that Ezekiel fawning over Carol was jabbing at him and obviously on his mind, then they could’ve had Daryl say anything. 

Why even have Daryl bring up Ezekiel in that snarky (but still jokey) tone if Daryl was just Carol’s friend and nothing more? Someone who only sees Carol as a friend wouldn’t really care or let alone bother to bring up who she’s having dinner with. 

Something like that only sticks with you and bothers you if you have romantic feelings for that someone. Obviously, the thought of them being with someone else in a potentially romantic way would innately bother you. 

I also think this kinda counts as a parallel to Carol’s “Just so you know, I liked you first”. In both cases, Carol and Daryl are making jokes but they have undertones of what I would call jealousy (though Carol’s was a lot more frivolous than Daryl’s) conveyed in a subtle way. And in both cases, we have the other person responding with “stop/shut up”. 

Jealousy like this is a natural feeling to experience when you are in love. So, in conclusion, Carol and Daryl’s feelings for each other exceed familial/friendship and this is just one example. :)

A few years ago, when I was living in the housing co-op and looking for a quick cookie recipe, I came across a blog post for something called “Norwegian Christmas butter squares.” I’d never found anything like it before: it created rich, buttery and chewy cookies, like a vastly superior version of the holiday sugar cookies I’d eaten growing up. About a year ago I went looking for the recipe again, and failed to find it. The blog had been taken down, and it sent me into momentary panic. 

Luckily, I remembered enough to find it on the Wayback Machine, and quickly copied it into a file that I’ve saved ever since. I probably make these cookies about once a month, and they last about five days around my voracious husband - they’re fantastic with a cup of bitter coffee or tea. I’m skeptical that there is something distinctively Norwegian about these cookies, but they do seem like the perfect thing to eat on a cold day. 

Norwegian Christmas Butter Squares

1 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 egg
1 cup sugar
2 cups flour
1 tsp vanilla
½ tsp salt
Turbinado/ Raw Sugar for dusting

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Chill a 9x13″ baking pan in the freezer. Do not grease the pan.

Using a mixer, blend the butter, egg, sugar, and salt together until it is creamy.  Add the flour and vanilla and mix using your hands until the mixture holds together in large clumps. If it seems overly soft, add a little extra flour. 

Using your hands, press the dough out onto the chilled and ungreased baking sheet until it is even and ¼ inch thick.  Dust the top of the cookies evenly with raw sugar.

Bake at 400 degrees until the edges turn a golden brown, about 12-15 minutes. Remove from the oven. Let cool for about five minutes before cutting the cooked dough into squares. Remove the squares from the warm pan using a spatula.

npr.org
When Residents Take Ownership, A Mobile Home Community Thrives
A neighborhood in Minnesota is proving that there's a potential solution to run-down mobile home parks: The residents banded together democratically and purchased their community.

Typically, the companies that own mobile home parks also own the infrastructure, and the less money they spend maintaining it, the more profit they can make. Housing specialists say that’s one of the main reasons why many manufactured home parks look worn down and scruffy — like Park Plaza did before they formed a co-op.

Many people love to blame the bad conditions in most trailer parks on some sort of pathology of the residents, but if you give the residents control and more power over their homes and cut out more landlords, things dramatically improve.

“how many times was draco hit before he learned to flinch away so quickly?”

p.s it hurts me to hear the way draco says “yes, father” and the way he looks at lucius

Can we take a moment to imagine Les Amis and co. in a bounce house?

- Courfeyrac rented it for Feuilly’s birthday because “C'mon man, you deserve a bounce house! You work 3 jobs 7 days a week for crying out loud!” but also because he just really wanted to go on a bounce house.

- Bahorel helps Courf literally throw Feuilly into the bounce house and then proceeds to dive in himself.

- Feuilly pretends to sigh about the whole situation but he’s actually very pleased that he gets to enjoy his birthday off work in such a ridiculous way.

- Combeferre adores seeing Courf having so much fun on this giant balloon monstrosity that he’s rented and joins his boyfriend in somersaulting from one end of the bounce house to the other and back.

- Joly, Bossuet, and Musichetta hold hands while they’re bouncing - so when Bossuet trips and falls he drags his significant others down with him and they all land in a heap, tangled together and laughing so hard that they cry.

- Grantaire, slightly tipsy, falls over inside the bounce house and lands directly on top of Enjolras, which leads to much blushing and many mumbled apologies.

- Montparnasse comes to the party at Jehan’s request. He feels awkward at first since he’s never really interacted with the rest of Les Amis in a social setting before, but after a while Parnasse can be found dancing with Jehan inside the bounce house and loudly singing along to Taylor Swift’s “22”

- Gavroche riding on Courf’s shoulders as Courf bounces until Gav falls off laughing. Gavroche and Azelma getting to enjoy being children in a bounce house surrounded by their adopted family.

- Marius and Cosette are basically joined at the hip and can’t stop smiling and staring at each other, causing them to frequently crash into others inside the bounce house, much to everyone’s amusement.

- Eponine keeps “accidentally” pushing Grantaire in Enjolras’s direction while they bounce and not-so-subtly hinting to her best friend to “just go for it, R!” because “How cool would it be to be able to say that your first kiss with Apollo was in a fucking bounce house?!” (Years later, at Enjolras and Grantaire’s wedding, Grantaire thanks Eponine for her meddling.)

theatlantic.com
The Hot New Millennial Housing Trend Is a Repeat of the Middle Ages
Communal living is hardly a departure from tradition—it's a return to how humans have been making their homes for thousands of years.
By Ilana E. Strauss

As a means of facilitating involved community, sharing resources and enabling each other to live better lives I think this has tremendous solarpunk potential.