climate vulnerability

anonymous asked:

A lot of conservationists try to maintain an ecosystem that would exist without human intervention, but climate change is affecting every ecosystem globally. How can conservationists respond to climate change while still maintaining a "natural" ecosystem?

Rather than trying to preserve protected areas such as national parks as little pictures of a past to which we cannot return, conservation science and practice are examining how we can conserve ecosystem function, such as fire, and individual species across landscapes under potential future scenarios. Integration of historical and projected climate change trends and ecosystem changes and future vulnerabilities into resource management can allow us to manage ecosystems and species under climate change. Fire management re-targeted to areas of higher risk of catastrophic fire under climate change, conservation of potential climate change refugia for endangered species, invasive species control targeted to areas more vulnerable under climate change, and other measures can help conserve ecosystems and species.

When I was, young and fantasized about becoming a wildlife filmmaker, I imagined I would be living in some remote wilderness meticulously documenting the wildlife that lived there. But it soon became clear that my idea of wilderness was in grave need of revision. In my travels around the world it became clear that our influence extends to every corner of this globe, and there are few natural ecosystems, if any, that are not in some way managed by humans. While working on our most recent film in Yosemite National Park, I asked a few forest ecologists this same question, how do you manage the forests of the Sierra’s in the face of a rapidly changing climate? They told me that they are now looking at climate models to help craft conservation strategies based on what they think the future climate may be. Part of that strategy is to identify refugia, places where special environmental circumstances may enable some species to survive as the climate grows warmer. During past climatic events it is believed that these refugia allowed some communities of species to survive, while others in the surrounding area, passed into extinction. But this is just a piece of that conservation puzzle, and curbing carbon emissions must be a part of that solution, because every species has a tipping point from which recover is impossible. An interesting read that has made me think a lot about our role in conservation (not specifically climate change) is Jon Mooallem’s book: “Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America” a fascinating and thought provoking read.

CITIES MOST VULNERABLE TO SEA-LEVEL RISE

When UN climate negotiators meet for summit talks this month, there will be a new figure on the table: 3C. Until now, global efforts such as the Paris climate agreement have tried to limit global warming to 2C above pre-industrial levels. However, with latest projections pointing to an increase of 3.2C by 2100, these goals seem to be slipping out of reach.

One of the biggest resulting threats to cities around the world is sea-level rise, caused by the expansion of water at higher temperatures and melting ice sheets on the north and south poles. Scientists at the non-profit organisation Climate Central estimate that 275 million people worldwide live in areas that will eventually be flooded at 3C of global warming.

The regional impact of these changes is highly uneven, with four out of five people affected living in Asia. Here are some the most vulnerable global cities in terms of the number of residents like to be flooded:

  • Shanghai, China:  17.5 million people to be flooded
  • Osaka, Japan: 5.2 million people affected

  • Alexandria, Egypt: 3 million people to be flooded

  • Miami, US:  2.7 million people to be flooded

  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil:  1.8 million people to be flooded

Source:  The Guardian (3 November 2017)

anonymous asked:

To Patrick, how do you expect to adapt NPS efforts to the consequences of climate change which alters how environment responds to conservation efforts negatively? I mean that the ecosystem does not respond to removing invasives, rehabilitating endangered species of animals, etc. in the same way (regenerate as quickly, return nutrients, , etc) as before.

Based on published scientific information on human climate change, the U.S. National Park Service (NPS) is developing measures to achieve its mission of conserving national parks for future generations. NPS has re-examined the goals of resource management. Rather than trying to preserve parks as little pictures of a past to which we cannot return, the agency now seeks to manage for potential future scenarios. Integration of historical and projected climate change trends and ecosystem changes and future vulnerabilities into resource management can allow us to manage species and ecosystems more effectively under climate change. Fire management re-targeted to areas of higher risk of catastrophic fire under climate change, conservation of potential climate change refugia for endangered species, invasive species control targeted to areas more vulnerable under climate change, and other measures can help conserve species and ecosystems.


[T]he framing of ‘sustainability’ in the global North is concerned with the future conditions of Northern citizens, often at the expense of the present existence of people in the global South. In this way, environmental imperialism demands that certain ‘vulnerable’ people are ‘resilient’ in the face of unfolding catastrophes. People’s capacity to survive can thus be recast as a commodity, turning their very survival into something that can be financialised and subsequently traded upon by those agencies who claim the authority of having resources to help alleviate their vulnerability. Climatic changes that might otherwise be deemed as threats to existing social arrangements are instead included as evidence that these arrangements must be further extended.
—  Leon Sealy-Huggins, ‘1.5°C to stay alive’: climate change, imperialism
and justice for the Caribbean
, 2017.
independent.co.uk
EU warns Trump: Paris climate deal is ‘irreversible and non-negotiable’
The Paris Agreement on global warming is “irreversible and non-negotiable”, the European Union has said in a blunt warning to climate science denier Donald Trump. The EU and 79 developing countries in Africa, the Pacific and Caribbean issued a statement in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the landmark deal and called for others to do the same. The Trump administration is currently considering whether to withdraw from the agreement, which committed the world to keeping global warming to as close to 1.5 degrees Celsius as possible.

Without specifically mentioning Mr Trump, Miguel Arias Cañete, the European Commissioner for climate action and energy, said: “Today more than ever, Europe stands by its long-term partners most vulnerable to climate change.

“We, developed and developing countries together, will defend the Paris Agreement.

“We are all in, and our joint commitment to this agreement today is as in Paris: irreversible and non-negotiable.”

re climate change, vulnerable communities seem to usually be an afterthought. i feel like i see so much more documentation about the effects of climate change on different cuddly animals or tree species than i do about the effects that it has on the poor

5807. Despite her ability to maintain her body temperature, Starfire is very vulnerable in climates where the temperature is low and the sun is obscured. Her temperature drops rapidly and without the sunlight she's not able to warm up or recharge energy. Winter in the Arctic is death for her.

submitted by anonymous

Climate change is a feminist issue. The countries that are hit the hardest are poor, developing nations with extreme gender inequality where women can’t swim, travel without a male relative, or often go long distances to get water for their family. That’s why 90% of 150,000 people killed in the 1991 Bangladesh cyclone were women.

If you are serious about feminism, you need to get serious about climate change.

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/climate-change-women-more-vulnerable-to-dangers-of-global-warming-than-men-say-leading-academics-a6717311.html