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Heartland’s ‘6 Reasons To Be A Climate-Change Skeptic’ Are Six Demonstrable Lies

“At a time where science is critical to the future of humanity, it’s important that we all agree on the facts. We may disagree on policy, on the best course of action for society or the world, or on which concern is most paramount in terms of importance. But we have to agree on the same facts as a starting point. If the only way you can make your argument for your desired policy position is to tell lies or distort what we actually know, then no amount of reasoning will change your mind. You can’t reason someone out of a position they didn’t reason themselves into.”

Earlier this week, the executive editor of the Heartland Institute published a declaration that he was a climate change skeptic, and put forth the six major reasons why this was so. These reasons were well-thought-out, specific, and best of all, subject to analysis. So, what better way to test the science than to do that analysis, and to see where the chips fell? That’s exactly what I’ve gone and put together: an in-depth analysis of all six points, to see if there are any good, robust, legitimate reasons to be a climate-change skeptic. This isn’t about scoring points or helping one side win; it’s about sussing out the scientific validity of a position. Is there any?

Come see what the truth behind the claims is, and see if it opens your eyes to what’s going on in this decades-old argument!

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The  Trump administration deleted the EPA’s climate change website. So, Chicago published it instead.

  • The city of Chicago this weekend added a new climate-change page to its website, and if it sounds familiar it’s because the information on it comes from the climate page the Environmental Protection Agency used to have — until the Trump administration deleted it last week.
  • “While this information may not be readily available on the agency’s webpage right now, here in Chicago we know climate change is real and we will continue to take action to fight it,” the page reads. Read more (5/8/17)

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Biggest mistake Trump has made so far in his presidency is withdrawing from the Paris Agreement. This puts the US among two other countries in the world not signed on to these accords– Nicaragua (who has excellent climate policies and didn’t think the treaty went far enough) and Syria (who is in the midst of a horrific civil war). Regarding climate, the United States stands on an island alone, isolated from the progress and unity of the rest of the world. Instead of taking the chance to lead the world in the climate change battle, investing in renewables and kick starting the American economy with it, Trump has chosen to reject the world and reject the facts. It’s an embarrassing day to be an American.

Breaking: Trump will withdraw US from Paris climate agreement

  • President Donald Trump is expected to pull the United States out of the historic Paris climate agreement on Wednesday, according to a report by Axios that was later confirmed by CBS News.
  • According to the reports, specific logistics on how are still being arranged by a team that includes EPA administrator Scott Pruitt.
  • The Paris agreement, in which the U.S. pledged to lower its greenhouse gas emissions 26% by 2025, was formally signed by 195 countries in December 2015. The pact is the world’s largest effort to reverse the damaging effectsof man-made climate change. Read more (5/31/17 9 AM)
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This Earth Day (April 22) we must  remain humble and be reminded of the environmental fights we have already lost so that we can learn from our mistakes and fight for a better future for us, our children, and the world.These 5 environmental battles we have sadly already lost, or are very close to losing, serve as a reminder of why we need to keep fighting. Read more

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theguardian.com
I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations | Victoria Herrmann
These politically motivated data deletions come at a time when the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average
By Victoria Herrmann

As an Arctic researcher, I’m used to gaps in data. Just over 1% of US Arctic waters have been surveyed to modern standards. In truth, some of the maps we use today haven’t been updated since the second world war. Navigating uncharted waters can prove difficult, but it comes with the territory of working in such a remote part of the world.

Over the past two months though, I’ve been navigating a different type of uncharted territory: the deleting of what little data we have by the Trump administration.

At first, the distress flare of lost data came as a surge of defunct links on 21 January. The US National Strategy for the Arctic, the Implementation Plan for the Strategy, and the report on our progress all gone within a matter of minutes. As I watched more and more links turned red, I frantically combed the internet for archived versions of our country’s most important polar policies.

I had no idea then that this disappearing act had just begun.

Since January, the surge has transformed into a slow, incessant march of deleting datasets, webpages and policies about the Arctic. I now come to expect a weekly email request to replace invalid citations, hoping that someone had the foresight to download statistics about Arctic permafrost thaw or renewable energy in advance of the purge.

Continue Reading.

theguardian.com
Stop swooning over Justin Trudeau. The man is a disaster for the planet | Bill McKibben
Donald Trump is a creep and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite when it comes to climate change
By Bill McKibben

Donald Trump is so spectacularly horrible that it’s hard to look away – especially now that he’s discovered bombs. But precisely because everyone’s staring gape-mouthed in his direction, other world leaders are able to get away with almost anything. Don’t believe me? Look one country north, at Justin Trudeau.

Look all you want, in fact – he sure is cute, the planet’s only sovereign leader who appears to have recently quit a boy band. And he’s mastered so beautifully the politics of inclusion: compassionate to immigrants, insistent on including women at every level of government. Give him great credit where it’s deserved: in lots of ways he’s the anti-Trump, and it’s no wonder Canadians swooned when he took over.

But when it comes to the defining issue of our day, climate change, he’s a brother to the old orange guy in Washington. 

Not rhetorically: Trudeau says all the right things, over and over. He’s got no Scott Pruitts in his cabinet: everyone who works for him says the right things. Indeed, they specialize in getting others to say them too – it was Canadian diplomats, and the country’s environment minister, Catherine McKenna, who pushed at the Paris climate talks for a tougher-than-expected goal: holding the planet’s rise in temperature to 1.5C (2.7F).

But those words are meaningless if you keep digging up more carbon and selling it to people to burn, and that’s exactly what Trudeau is doing. He’s hard at work pushing for new pipelines through Canada and the US to carry yet more oil out of Alberta’s tar sands, which is one of the greatest climate disasters on the planet.

Last month, speaking at a Houston petroleum industry gathering, he got a standing ovation from the oilmen for saying: “No country would find 173bn barrels of oil in the ground and just leave them there.”

Yes, 173bn barrels is indeed the estimate for recoverable oil in the tar sands. So let’s do some math. If Canada digs up that oil and sells it to people to burn, it will produce, according to the math whizzes at Oil Change International, 30% of the carbon necessary to take us past the 1.5C target that Canada helped set in Paris.

That is to say, Canada, which represents one half of 1% of the planet’s population, is claiming the right to sell the oil that will use up a third of the earth’s remaining carbon budget. Trump is a creep and a danger and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite.

Continue Reading.

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No, Winter Storm Stella doesn’t disprove climate change

  • Climate change deniers are at it again. The logic goes, “How could global warming be real when your driveway is piling up with cold, cold snow?”
  • Well, there’s bad news for deniers — research has shown that extreme weather, for example, massive snowstorms, are actually linked to climate change.
  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency, which has studied climate change extensively winter storms have increased in both “frequency and intensity,” and climate change is “increasing the odds of more extreme weather events taking place.”
  • As meteorologist Eric Holthaus wrote in Slate in 2016, just after a record-breaking winter storm dropped 26.6 inches of snow on New York City in just one day, “there is clear evidence global warming is boosting the odds of recent big Northeast snowstorms.” Read more (3/13/17 6:21 PM)

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Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement is more than another bullet point in his anti-environment, anti-regulation policy agenda, it’s also a huge potential blow to thousands of American citizens, especially people of color, who often unfairly bear the brunt of climate change’s effects. Read more (5/31/17)

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Stephen Hawking calls out Trump for causing irreversible damage on Earth

  • Stephen Hawking has some bad news for the Earth — we may be reaching damage beyond repair.
  • In an interview with BBC on Sunday, the famed theoretical physicist said he believes Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement could lead to permanent, irreversible destruction for the planet. Read more (7/3/17)

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The First Climate Model Turns 50, And Predicted Global Warming Almost Perfectly

“The big advance of Manabe and Wetherald’s work was to model not just the feedbacks but the interrelationships between the different components that contribute to the Earth’s temperature. As the atmospheric contents change, so do both the absolute and relative humidity, which impacts cloud cover, water vapor content and cycling/convection of the atmosphere. What they found is that if you start with a stable initial state – roughly what Earth experienced for thousands of years prior to the start of the industrial revolution – you can tinker with one component (like CO2) and model how everything else evolves.”

In 1967, a groundbreaking paper in climate science was published, detailing the inputs and feedbacks for the first accurate climate model. You don’t have to look far to find contentions that climate models are wrong, inaccurate and unreliable: 8 of the first 10 results on google state it. Yet if you look at the science, the original model, even at age 50, does a remarkable job of getting things right. The biggest success? Understanding how large-scale processes work, including the thermodynamic effects of adding additional greenhouse gases to Earth’s atmosphere. The increase of temperature – approximately 2 degrees C for a doubling of CO2 – was well known then, and continues to be well known today. There are uncertainties and difficulties in modern models, but that doesn’t mean there’s uncertainty surrounding global warming. Quite to the contrary, the evidence has never been better.

The time for debate has long since passed, and claiming we live in a post-fact era doesn’t change the scientific truth or the urgency and necessity of global action. Come get the science today.

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An ice shelf the size of Delaware is about to break from Antarctica

  • A giant chunk of ice the size of Delaware is threatening to cleave itself from one of the largest ice shelves in Antarctica, and its imminent collapse could further threaten the landscape of the region.
  • On July 5, researchers at the European Space Agency’s CryoSat mission announced in a report that a large crack running along the Larsen C ice shelf now measures 200 km, leaving just five kilometers — or three miles — between in the bottom of the crack and the ocean.
  • The iceberg that could result from the break would be around 2,300 square miles in size, which, as CNN reports, is roughly seven times the size of New York City. Read more (7/6/17)

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