ID #84051

Name: Thomas
Age: 16
Country: Australia

Hey I’m Thomas and I’m looking for a penpal (duh).
I really love animals and the environment. I’m a part of the AYCC (Australian Youth Climate Coalition) which is a group of young people fighting for just solutions to the climate crisis.
I’m trying to learn Spanish at the moment and it would be great to chat to a natural born speaker.
Same with Japanese but I struggle a bit more with this one.
I’m really just trying to make friends in different countries (or maybe my own), so hit me up if you want to talk!

Preferences:
I’d prefer 14+ and not living in Australia, but if you are I’m up for that. I’m pretty much down for anything else, except you know, bigotry and whatnot.

2

The  Trump administration deleted the EPA’s climate change website. So, Chicago published it instead.

  • The city of Chicago this weekend added a new climate-change page to its website, and if it sounds familiar it’s because the information on it comes from the climate page the Environmental Protection Agency used to have — until the Trump administration deleted it last week.
  • “While this information may not be readily available on the agency’s webpage right now, here in Chicago we know climate change is real and we will continue to take action to fight it,” the page reads. Read more (5/8/17)

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theguardian.com
I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations | Victoria Herrmann
These politically motivated data deletions come at a time when the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average
By Victoria Herrmann

As an Arctic researcher, I’m used to gaps in data. Just over 1% of US Arctic waters have been surveyed to modern standards. In truth, some of the maps we use today haven’t been updated since the second world war. Navigating uncharted waters can prove difficult, but it comes with the territory of working in such a remote part of the world.

Over the past two months though, I’ve been navigating a different type of uncharted territory: the deleting of what little data we have by the Trump administration.

At first, the distress flare of lost data came as a surge of defunct links on 21 January. The US National Strategy for the Arctic, the Implementation Plan for the Strategy, and the report on our progress all gone within a matter of minutes. As I watched more and more links turned red, I frantically combed the internet for archived versions of our country’s most important polar policies.

I had no idea then that this disappearing act had just begun.

Since January, the surge has transformed into a slow, incessant march of deleting datasets, webpages and policies about the Arctic. I now come to expect a weekly email request to replace invalid citations, hoping that someone had the foresight to download statistics about Arctic permafrost thaw or renewable energy in advance of the purge.

Continue Reading.

9

This Earth Day (April 22) we must  remain humble and be reminded of the environmental fights we have already lost so that we can learn from our mistakes and fight for a better future for us, our children, and the world.These 5 environmental battles we have sadly already lost, or are very close to losing, serve as a reminder of why we need to keep fighting. Read more

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theguardian.com
Stop swooning over Justin Trudeau. The man is a disaster for the planet | Bill McKibben
Donald Trump is a creep and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite when it comes to climate change
By Bill McKibben

Donald Trump is so spectacularly horrible that it’s hard to look away – especially now that he’s discovered bombs. But precisely because everyone’s staring gape-mouthed in his direction, other world leaders are able to get away with almost anything. Don’t believe me? Look one country north, at Justin Trudeau.

Look all you want, in fact – he sure is cute, the planet’s only sovereign leader who appears to have recently quit a boy band. And he’s mastered so beautifully the politics of inclusion: compassionate to immigrants, insistent on including women at every level of government. Give him great credit where it’s deserved: in lots of ways he’s the anti-Trump, and it’s no wonder Canadians swooned when he took over.

But when it comes to the defining issue of our day, climate change, he’s a brother to the old orange guy in Washington. 

Not rhetorically: Trudeau says all the right things, over and over. He’s got no Scott Pruitts in his cabinet: everyone who works for him says the right things. Indeed, they specialize in getting others to say them too – it was Canadian diplomats, and the country’s environment minister, Catherine McKenna, who pushed at the Paris climate talks for a tougher-than-expected goal: holding the planet’s rise in temperature to 1.5C (2.7F).

But those words are meaningless if you keep digging up more carbon and selling it to people to burn, and that’s exactly what Trudeau is doing. He’s hard at work pushing for new pipelines through Canada and the US to carry yet more oil out of Alberta’s tar sands, which is one of the greatest climate disasters on the planet.

Last month, speaking at a Houston petroleum industry gathering, he got a standing ovation from the oilmen for saying: “No country would find 173bn barrels of oil in the ground and just leave them there.”

Yes, 173bn barrels is indeed the estimate for recoverable oil in the tar sands. So let’s do some math. If Canada digs up that oil and sells it to people to burn, it will produce, according to the math whizzes at Oil Change International, 30% of the carbon necessary to take us past the 1.5C target that Canada helped set in Paris.

That is to say, Canada, which represents one half of 1% of the planet’s population, is claiming the right to sell the oil that will use up a third of the earth’s remaining carbon budget. Trump is a creep and a danger and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite.

Continue Reading.

9

The First Climate Model Turns 50, And Predicted Global Warming Almost Perfectly

“The big advance of Manabe and Wetherald’s work was to model not just the feedbacks but the interrelationships between the different components that contribute to the Earth’s temperature. As the atmospheric contents change, so do both the absolute and relative humidity, which impacts cloud cover, water vapor content and cycling/convection of the atmosphere. What they found is that if you start with a stable initial state – roughly what Earth experienced for thousands of years prior to the start of the industrial revolution – you can tinker with one component (like CO2) and model how everything else evolves.”

In 1967, a groundbreaking paper in climate science was published, detailing the inputs and feedbacks for the first accurate climate model. You don’t have to look far to find contentions that climate models are wrong, inaccurate and unreliable: 8 of the first 10 results on google state it. Yet if you look at the science, the original model, even at age 50, does a remarkable job of getting things right. The biggest success? Understanding how large-scale processes work, including the thermodynamic effects of adding additional greenhouse gases to Earth’s atmosphere. The increase of temperature – approximately 2 degrees C for a doubling of CO2 – was well known then, and continues to be well known today. There are uncertainties and difficulties in modern models, but that doesn’t mean there’s uncertainty surrounding global warming. Quite to the contrary, the evidence has never been better.

The time for debate has long since passed, and claiming we live in a post-fact era doesn’t change the scientific truth or the urgency and necessity of global action. Come get the science today.

3

No, Winter Storm Stella doesn’t disprove climate change

  • Climate change deniers are at it again. The logic goes, “How could global warming be real when your driveway is piling up with cold, cold snow?”
  • Well, there’s bad news for deniers — research has shown that extreme weather, for example, massive snowstorms, are actually linked to climate change.
  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency, which has studied climate change extensively winter storms have increased in both “frequency and intensity,” and climate change is “increasing the odds of more extreme weather events taking place.”
  • As meteorologist Eric Holthaus wrote in Slate in 2016, just after a record-breaking winter storm dropped 26.6 inches of snow on New York City in just one day, “there is clear evidence global warming is boosting the odds of recent big Northeast snowstorms.” Read more (3/13/17 6:21 PM)

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Happy Earth Day everyone. Remember this year we march for science, so wherever you are, however you can, please get involved. Science serves us all, it protects our air and water, preserves our planet, saves lives, creates new industries, puts food on our tables, educates the next generation, and safeguards our future. We all have a voice and we can only bring about change if we band together to use it.

2

The Trump administration moves to make deep cuts to the key climate science agency

  • Trump’s administration is planning a 17% cut to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration according to a leaked memo obtained by the Washington Post. 
  • The NOAA is tasked with monitoring oceans, preparing for potentially dangerous storms and assessing the dangers of climate change.
  • The leak comes on the heels of a similar announcement about the Environmental Protection Agency, which is expected to see a 25% cut to its budget, according to Science.
  • Many of the cuts focus on research and development, including the complete elimination of a program called Sea Grant, which supports coastal research at various universities. Read more (3/3/17 9:06 PM)
5

People are cancelling their ‘New York Times’ subscriptions over a climate change column

  • Newly hired New York Times columnist Bret Stephens’ controversial first column is going over like a lead balloon with the paper’s progressive readers — some of whom are furiously pledging to unsubscribe.
  • In the column, Stephens cautions readers that even though the data pointed to Hillary Clinton winning the election, that’s not what ended up happening. “There’s a lesson here” about climate change, he says.
  • “We live in a world in which data convey authority. But authority has a way of descending to certitude, and certitude begets hubris,” Stephens wrote.
  • “Claiming total certainty about the science traduces the spirit of science and creates openings for doubt whenever a climate claim proves wrong.”
  • Stephens’ skepticism incensed scores of readers, many of whom claimed on Twitter to be in the process of cancelling their subscriptions. Read more (5/1/17)

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