Tropical Storm Seymour will strengthen into a hurricane

Tropic Storm Seymour is currently miles away from the coast of Mexico — but, according to the Weather Channel, the storm is expected to strengthen into a hurricane “soon.” The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has issued advisories for Seymour — but does it pose any threat of making landfall?

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Trump Promises to Cut Funding to Climate Change Programs in First 100 Days
In Gettysburg this weekend, Trump unveiled his agenda for first 100 days in office.

Donald Trump promised he would immediately redistribute funds earmarked for UN climate change programs and channel them to domestic projects. In a speech in Gettysburg, Trump said during his first 100 days in office, he would also lift restrictions on energy production, including oil, natural gas and “clean coal,” and greenlight projects such as the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Donald Trump didn't face a single debate question about climate change during his candidacy
Trump made it through three general election debates and 11 primary debates without being asked about the planet's rising temperatures.
By Dana Varinsky

Wednesday night’s final presidential debate brought Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s total debate count to 14. And he managed to complete all of them — well over 20 hours of televised time — without facing a single question about climate change.

Progressive media research center Media Matters for America kept a scorecard throughout the primary debates to tally the number of questions related to climate change that were asked in each one.

The site calculated that, of the 958 questions asked during the 12 Republican presidential debates, just nine (less than 1%) were about climate change. And none of those questions were directed toward Trump. (Ted Cruz also didn’t field a single climate-change question, though Marco Rubio, Chris Christie, and John Kasich all did.)

Navajo Water Supply is More Horrific than Flint, But No One Cares Because they’re Native American

The news out of Flint, Michigan brought the issue of contaminated drinking water into sharp focus, as it was revealed that officials at every level—local, state and federal—knew about lead-poisoned water for months but did nothing to address the problem.

Under state-run systems like utilities and roads, poorer communities are the last to receive attention from government plagued by inefficiencies and corrupt politicians. Perhaps no group knows this better than Native Americans, who have been victimized by government for centuries.

In the western U.S., water contamination has been a way of life for many tribes. The advocacy group Clean Up The Mines! describes the situation in Navajo country, which is far worse than in Flint, Michigan.

Since the 1950s, their water has been poisoned by uranium mining to fuel the nuclear industry and the making of atomic bombs for the U.S. military. Coal mining and coal-fired power plants have added to the mix. The latest assault on Navajo water was carried out by the massive toxic spills into the Animas and San Juan rivers when the EPA recklessly attempted to address the abandoned Gold King mine.

“In 2015 the Gold King Mine spill was a wake-up call to address dangers of abandoned mines, but there are currently more than 15,000 toxic uranium mines that remain abandoned throughout the US,” said Charmaine White Face from the South Dakota based organization Defenders of the Black Hills. “For more than 50 years, many of these hazardous sites have been contaminating the land, air, water, and national monuments such as Mt. Rushmore and the Grand Canyon. Each one of these thousands of abandoned uranium mines is a potential Gold King mine disaster with the greater added threat of radioactive pollution. For the sake of our health, air, land, and water, we can’t let that happen.”

There is no comprehensive law requiring cleanup of abandoned uranium mines, meaning corporations and government can walk away from them after exploiting their resources. 75 percent of abandoned uranium mines are on federal and Tribal lands.

Leona Morgan of Diné No Nukes points out one example: “The United Nuclear Corporation mill tailings spill of 1979, north of Churchrock, New Mexico left an immense amount of radioactive contamination that down-streamers, today, are currently receiving in their drinking water. A mostly-Navajo community in Sanders, Arizona has been exposed to twice the legal limit allowable for uranium through their tap.”

Last week, Diné No Nukes participated in protests in Washington, D.C. to raise awareness of past and ongoing contamination of water supplies in the west, which disproportionately affects Indian country.

“These uranium mines cause radioactive contamination, and as a result all the residents in their vicinity are becoming nuclear radiation victims,” said Petuuche Gilbert of the Laguna Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment, the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment and Indigenous World Association. “New Mexico and the federal government have provided little funding for widespread clean up and only occasionally are old mines remediated.  The governments of New Mexico and the United States have a duty to clean up these radioactive mines and mills and, furthermore, to perform health studies to determine the effects of radioactive poisoning. The MASE and LACSE organizations oppose new uranium mining and demand legacy uranium mines to be cleaned up,” said Mr. Gilbert.

Politicians continue to take advantage of Native Americans, making deals with mining companies that would continue polluting their water supplies. Senator John McCain sneaked a resolution into the last defense bill which gave land to Resolution Copper. Their planned copper mining would poison waters that Apaches rely on and would desecrate the ceremonial grounds at Oak Flat.

While EPA and local officials have been forced to address the poisoned water in Flint, the contamination of Indian country water supplies continues. A bill called the Uranium Exploration and Mining Accountability Act, introduced by Arizona Congressman Raúl Grijalva, has languished in Congress for two years.

Hundreds in Los Angeles Protest Against Climate Change
Celebrities joined some 800 people also protesting against the North Dakota pipeline

Hundreds of people gathered in Los Angeles on Sunday to protest against climate change and show support for activists demonstrating against the construction of an oil pipeline in North Dakota.

In North Dakota, more than 80 protesters were arrested on Saturday after clashing with police near a pipeline construction site, according to the local sheriff’s department, which pepper sprayed demonstrators.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe and environmental activists have been protesting construction of the 1,100-mile (1,886-km) pipeline in North Dakota for several months, saying it threatens the water supply and sacred sites.

Adding seaweed to cattle feed could reduce methane production by 70%
That's equivalent to taking India’s CO2 emissions off the map.
By Bec Crew

If we add dried seaweed to 2 percent of sheep and cattle feed, we could cut methane emissions by more than 70 percent, scientists have found.

With livestock responsible for 44 percent of all human-caused methane - a gas that has 36 times the global warming potential of CO2 - this could cut a huge chunk of the 3.1 gigatonnes these animals release into the atmosphere each year in burps and farts.

To put that 3.1 gigatonnes of methane into perspective, the entire European Union releases just over that amount of CO2 each year.

And if we cut that 3.1 gigatonnes by 70 percent by adding seaweed to livestock feed, we’d be clearing 2.17 gigatonnes of methane released into the atmosphere by livestock every year.

That’s almost the amount of CO2 the entire country of India emits every year.

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