clean ride

The Signs' In A Relationship

Aries: Tries to be mean, fails, needs attention 24/7

Taurus: Clingy, low-key obsessed, says ily way too much

Gemini: Chill, no effort required, will go psycho on you when you argue

Cancer: Smol child, protect them, feed sweets and be rewarded

Leo: Every day is a sex day, better buckle up pal you’re in for one hell of a ride

Virgo: Clean freak, no chill, gets flustered easily

Libra: There has to be a constant emotional connection, salty if relationship is unfair

Scorpio: Insane, Netflix and chill, coffee and long discussions needed

Sagittarius: Whoop lol, a lot of fun, but break up and fam you better run

Capricorn: Do they love you? Playing mind games all the time

Aquarius: Quirky but cool, likes hugs, endless tv series

Pisces: AHHHHHHH, boi, kind of emotional but you dig it

How to clean: BRUSHES

The next thing we are going to learn, my children, is how to clean brushes. Thanks to @pokeswap for the suggestion. 

So just imagine this, you live in Southern California, where there is no need for covered arenas because it basically never rains. But suddenly this “El Nino” decides to storm on in and flood your arenas. Well, there’s nothing you can really do at the barn today, right?

WRONG! In these dark times, while your beautiful jumping arena becomes a watering hole for the local wildlife, I invite you to be awesome and get shit done. One thing that many of us don’t do enough is clean our brushes. (This is especially important if you are using the same grooming brushes on multiple horses). 

Cleaning brushes is relatively simple, but it can be an annoying task when you need those brushes to actually groom horses. So I suggest cleaning your brushes on a day when you don’t need them, or setting a couple aside so you can still groom horses. 

I fill up a LARGE bucket (one that you don’t use for feeding) with water, warm if possible, and then add bleach (get a gallon at the dollar store and keep it in your tack room because bleach is bae), a few cups, no exact measurement. After rinsing your brushes with a hose, then put them in the bucket, making sure that the bristles are in the water. (I like to put my curry combs, mane brushes and hoofpicks in there too). Let it soak for an hour or so. Then dump the bucket (not by any ponies), rinse the brushes with a hose. If they are super nasty, then maybe do a second soak. Once the brushes are clean, rinse them out with a hose, and lay them out to dry. Make sure they are fully dried before putting them into a tack trunk or tack box. 

For extra soft/expensive brushes I use a shedding blade to get the hair and dust out (gently), then lightly spray with a bleach and water solution to disinfect. (1 part bleach to 3 parts water).

Bleach is great.