classification: water tribe

anonymous asked:

I think Sokka's quest for identity is one of the most interesting things about him. What it means to be a man, to be useful and to be acknowledged is an interesting central conflict for a supporting character. What do you think S3 Sokka believes it takes to be a man. I think he's learnt to intercede and mediate issues in his family and to make tough choices. What else can you think of?

Sokka: Now men, it’s important that you show no fear when you face a firebender. In the Water Tribe, we fight to the last man standing. For without courage, how can we call ourselves men?

Another excellent question! Sokka’s quest for identity is intrinsically linked to his quest for manliness, because if you’ll recall, Sokka was not able to become a man by Water Tribe custom before he was nominally put in charge of the tribe:

Bato: How about you, Sokka? You must have some good stories from your first time ice-dodging?
Katara: He never got to go. Dad left before he was old enough.
Bato: Oh, I forgot, you were too young.
Aang: What’s ice-dodging?
Bato: It’s a rite of passage for young water tribe members.

But while Katara was helping with the chores, keeping her family together and helping to deliver babies, Sokka was left adrift, without a paternal example to emulate for two of his teenage years. War never came to his doorstep, so he resorts to “training” the kindergarten crowed. And notice that Katara (and likely the other members of his tribe) don’t take this seriously:

Katara: Ugh, I’m embarrassed to be related to you! Ever since Mom died I’ve been doing all the work around camp while you’ve been off playing soldier!

Playing soldier. Katara’s right: that’s exactly what Sokka has been doing, because the rigid gender expectations of being a man don’t allow him to do anything else. One Aang arrives and upends Sokka’s world, his identity as a would-be man collides with the reality of the war and the people around him.

The Four Parts of Being a Man (by Sokka)

1. Leader

Sokka : I know you all want to fly, but my instincts tell me we should play it safe this time and walk.
Katara: Who made you the boss?
Sokka: I’m not the boss—I’m the leader.
Katara : You’re the leader? But your voice still cracks!
Sokka: I’m the oldest and I’m a warrior. So…I’m the leader!

Katara: You’re hurt. Badly. You can’t fight anymore. 
Hakoda: Everyone’s counting on me to lead this mission, Katara. I won’t let them down. 
Sokka: Can’t you heal him any faster? 
Katara: I’m doing everything I can. 
Sokka: I’ll do it.
Katara: No offense Sokka but you’re not exactly Mr. Healing Hands.
Sokka: No.  I’ll lead the invasion force. 
Katara: Don’t be crazy, Sokka.
Sokka: Maybe I am a little crazy but the eclipse is about to start and we need to be up that volcano by the time it does.
Hakoda:  You can do this. I’m proud of you, son. 
Katara: I still think you’re crazy but I’m proud of you too. 

Sokka’s father is the chief, so it makes sense that being a man implies being a leader. But before his adventure, Sokka has only a nebulous idea of what that really means. Worse, he seems to think that being a man makes him a leader, instead of being a leader making him a man. When he first tries to assert his authority in “Jet”, he is met with ridicule:

Aang: Walking stinks! How do people go anywhere without a flying bison?
Katara: I don’t know Aang. Why don’t you ask Sokka’s instincts—they seem to know everything.
Sokka: Ha ha. Very funny.
Aang: I’m tired of carrying this pack.
Katara: You know who you should ask to carry it for a while? Sokka’s Instincts!
Aang: That’s a great idea! Hey, Sokka’s Instincts, would you mind—
Sokka: Okay, okay—I get it.

As so often happens, Sokka has to adapt to the situation. “Jet” is about a boy who, although a good leader in most senses, leads his team astray into murder and mayhem. Sokka, even though he is a novice, realizes innocent lives are on the line and warns the townspeople before the dam explodes. He didn’t expect to be a leader at the moment, but he didn’t fail when it really mattered. Throughout the series, his tactical and strategic successes accumulate until the entire GAang relies on him to plan their missions. And on “The Day of Black Sun”, despite his fumbling speech beforehand, Sokka takes the reins of the mission and performs admirably.

Aang: It’s over. The Fire Lord is probably long gone. Far away on some remote island where he’ll be safe during the eclipse.
Sokka: No. My instincts tell me he wouldn’t go too far. He would have a secret bunker. Somewhere he could go so it’ll be safe during a siege but still be close enough to lead his nation.
Toph: If it’s an underground secret bunker we’re looking for, I’m just the girl to find it. 

No one’s laughing at Sokka’s instincts now.

2. Protector

Katara : Sokka, you’re making a mistake. 
Sokka: No! I’m keeping my promise to Dad. I’m protecting you from threats like him! 

Illusion Yue: You didn’t protect me.

Sokka’s mother was murdered when he was very young, and there was nothing he could do about it. He knows from how devastated his father was and how driven he became to help the war effort that being a man must mean protecting people—especially the women in your life. Sokka protects Katara on multiple occasions from threats real (Jet, Mai) and imagined (Aang, Appa). Protecting Katara is his way of protecting the mother he couldn’t save as a boy. And his inability to protect Yue from sacrificing herself cuts him deeply. He overcompensates by trying to shield Suki from everything:

Suki:  Look, I know you’re just trying to help, but I can take care of myself. 
Sokka: I know you can. 
Suki: Then why are you acting so over protective?
Sokka: It’s so hard to lose someone you care about.  Something happened at the North Pole, and I couldn’t protect someone. I don’t want anything like that to ever happen again.

In the end, Sokka learns how to be protect the people he cares about without stifling them. His shielding of Toph in the finale is very similar to his protecting Katara in the pilot:

But there’s one key difference: in the pilot, Sokka thought of Katara as someone who is more in need of protection as a girl. In the finale, Sokka recognizes that Toph can’t see the falling shards of metal, but respects her fighting ability over and over:

Sokka: Did I mention how sweet it was that you invented metalbending?

Sokka: I am so glad we added you to the group!

3. Warrior

Even more than being a leader, being a warrior defines being a man in the Water Tribe. And no wonder; with decades of being raided by the ruthless Fire Nation, and waterbenders being increasingly scarce, the South would have had to rely more and more on brute strength to drive off the invaders. A warrior is also the one thing Sokka is most insecure about because it implies a certain skillset that he was too young to receive full training in. Not to mention, his sister is a waterbender and he is not. Witness this exchange from “The Warriors of Kyoshi”:

Sokka:  Who are you? Where are the men who ambushed us? 
Suki:  There were no men. We ambushed you. Now tell us, who are you and what are you doing here? 
Sokka:  Wait a second, there’s no way that a bunch of girls took us down. 

Although gender roles are fairly rigid in the Southern Water Tribe, the Sokka from the very beginning of the series feels the constant need to reinforce being a warrior as a “manly” pursuit and puts Katara down for being a girl. I am reminded of Iroh’s speech to Zuko:

Iroh: Prince Zuko, pride is not the opposite of shame, but its source.

Iroh: True humility is the only antidote to shame.

Sokka’s status as a nonbender is often a source of shame for him. He is treated differently by bending masters:

Master Pakku: Sokka.  Take care, son. 

And even his own teammates:

Toph: We can take ‘em. Three on three.
Sokka: Actually, Toph, there’s four of us.
Toph: Oh. I’m sorry, I didn’t count you. You know, no bending and all.
Sokka:  I can still fight!
Toph: Okay. Three on three plus Sokka.

This leads him to act proud of his manliness, an attribute that he needs no training or bending to have. He even tries to get Aang to act “manlier” and not answer to “Twinkletoes”. In the end, though, he confesses the truth about how he feels:

Sokka: Look, I appreciate the effort, but the fact is each of you is so amazing and so special, and I’m not. I’m just the guy in the group who’s regular. 

But Sokka is special, and as the series goes on, he proves his mettle with a balance of outlandish inventiveness and logical practicality:

Sokka: See, the problem with the old war balloon was you could get it airborne, but once you did, it just kept going.  You could put a hole in the top, but then all the hot air would escape. So the question became, how do you keep a lid on hot air? 
Katara: Ugh, if only we knew. 
Sokka: A lid is actually the answer. If you control the hot air, you control the war balloon. 
Katara: Hmm. That’s actually pretty smart. 


Sokka: I need a plan of this machine. Some schematics that show what the inside looks like. Then we can find it’s weak points. 
Aang: Where are we gonna get something like that What are you doing! Someone’s gonna hear us! 
Sokka:  That’s the point. I figure a machine this big needs engineers to run it, and when something breaks…
Katara: They come to fix it. 

He overcomes his insecurities as a warrior by being true to himself.

Piandao: Sokka, when you first arrived, you were so unsure. You even seemed down on yourself. But I saw something in you right away. I saw a heart as strong as a lion turtle, and twice as big. And as we trained, it wasn’t your skills that impressed me.  No, it certainly wasn’t your skills.  You showed something beyond that.  Creativity, versatility, intelligence… these are the traits that define a great swordsman. And these are the traits that define you.  You told me you didn’t know if you were worthy, but I believe that you are more worthy than any man I have ever trained. 

4. Father

Sokka can show how brave he is, how creative he is, and how much of a leader he’s become. But in the end, he measures his identity as a man by his father’s example:

Aang: Sokka, that speech wasn’t your moment of truth. That was just public speaking and nobody’s really good at that.
Sokka: My Dad is. He explained the plan perfectly and inspired everyone. Like a real leader should. 
Aang: Look, your moment of truth isn’t going to be in front of some map. It’s going to be out there, on the battlefield. 

Unlike with Zuko, Sokka’s confidence in his father is fully justified. As he grows and matures, he becomes, not a copy of his father, but his own person. He learns that he can be a warrior without putting others down, and he can assert authority without being pigheaded. He can trust in his own abilities, regardless of how skilled everyone else is around him. And Hakoda validates Sokka’s identity in every respect.

As a protector:

Hakoda: Sokka…
Sokka: I’m coming with you.
Hakoda: You’re not old enough to go to war, Sokka, you know that.
Sokka: I’m strong! I’m brave! I can fight! Please, Dad!
Hakoda: Being a man is knowing where you’re needed the most, and for you right now that’s here protecting your sister.
Sokka: I don’t understand.
Hakoda: Someday you will. I’m going to miss you so much.

As a warrior:

Hakoda: Ready to go knock some Fire Nation heads?
Sokka:  You don’t know how much this means to me dad. I’ll make you proud, and I’ll finally prove to you what a great warrior I am.
Hakoda:  Sokka, you don’t have to prove anything to me.  I’m already proud of you, and I’ve always known you were a great warrior.
Sokka
: Really?
Hakoda: Why do you think I trusted you to look after our tribe when I left?

As a leader:

Sokka: No. I’ll lead the invasion force. 
Katara: Don’t be crazy, Sokka.
Sokka: Maybe I am a little crazy but the eclipse is about to start and we need to be up that volcano by the time it does.
HakodaYou can do this. I’m proud of you, son. 

And as a man.

Hakoda: Bato, get these mines loaded up. The rest of you men, prepare for battle! 
Sokka: Uh, what should I do, Dad?
Hakoda: Aren’t you listening? I said the rest of you men get ready for battle.

Sokka will be a fantastic father to his own children someday, no matter what LOK might imply.

7

Background designs from the final episodes of Book One: WATER, Episode 18: The Waterbending Master / 19 & 20: The Siege of the North (Part 1 & 2). By Elsa Garagrava, Bryan Evans, Mike van Cleave (not sure about Konietzko, or others). Scans from ”The Art of the Animated series“ (order)

Bryan/Mike: The Avatar is a travelling road show, we rarely spent more than one episode in any given place. Being in the Northern Water Tribe for three epiosdes gave us the oportunity to further develop a complex location and explore it from many different angles. || Much consideration was given to what materials the Water Tribe would use in their architecture, due to their limited resources. In many places throughout the city, the structural supports were fashioned from whale bones, while Waterbenders formed the ice into beautiful buildings, bridges, and sculptures. 

My roommates, much like me, are very much into cross stitch. To be honest, they’re the reason I even got INTO cross stitch. They’ve taught me a ton and helped my skills improve so I love showing off their work too.

Roomie M has been working on a wooden trinket box, like mine; they decided to do the Water Tribe symbol from Avatar: the Last Airbender.

The pattern was done completely by hand, and they’re using metallic and satin thread for the entire pattern. They are very dedicated, and I wish them luck with evil metallic thread.