dailymail.co.uk
Eight men in WA charged with 503 child abuse offences against girl

Australia. Horrendous news of child rape. Recent sentencing shows very weak application of law. The named offenders can be sentenced for 6-13 years in prison. This is a horrendous crime and it should be dealt with appropriately. Western Australian community should demand so.

Deep Green Resistance is a radical feminist organization. Men as a class are waging a war against women. Rape, battering, incest, prostitution, pornography, poverty, and gynocide are both the main weapons in this war and the conditions that create the sex-class women.
http://ift.tt/1lnpqnQ

5 Ancient Black Civilizations That Were Not in Africa


The Minoans Ancient Greece

Archaeologist Manfred Bietak conducted extensive research on ancient Greek civilizations and their connections to ancient Egypt. Bietak unearthed evidence from artwork as early as 7000 B.C. that depicts the early people inhabiting Greece were of African descent.

The Minoan culture of Ancient Greece reached its peak at about 1600 B.C. They were known for their vibrant cities, opulent palaces and established trade connections. Minoan artwork is recognized as a major era of visual achievement in art history. Pottery, sculptures and frescoes from the Minoan Bronze age grace museum displays all over the world. Palace ruins indicate remnants of paved roads and piped water systems.


Indus Kush Civilization

On March 3, 2000, historian Runoko Rashidi gave a lecture in Honolulu, Hawaii, about the presence of Black people in ancient and modern India. He stated that the face of India changed around 2000 B.C. when nomadic people Indo-Europeans or Aryans traveled to the Innis Valley and other fertile locations in southern India.

Prior to the invasion, Blacks in India built rich and advanced civilizations. Author Wayne Chandler recanted his amazing discoveries about Blacks in ancient India in his book “African Presence in Early Asia.” The remarkable cities of Harrappa and Mohenjo-daro are only two of the many cities built by Black people. These cities cover large regions of northern India and modern-day Pakistan.



Ancient Mexico

The Olmecs were an ancient civilization in the Americas. Researchers such as Rashidi, Ivan Van Sertima and Alexander Von Wuthenau have discovered and shared evidence showing that the original inhabitants of Mexico were of African descent. The Olmecs were no different from people found in the Mende regions of West Africa.

Best known for carving the colossal stone heads that date back to 1100 B.C., more evidence of their existence before European explorers has been found. The Olmecs built pyramid-like structures made of mud in Mexico. They were also very artistic and created terracotta art that displayed common activities like pottery-making and wrestling. To add to their achievements, the Olmec people developed a calendar system around 3100 B.C.


Shang Dynasty of Ancient China

In a genetic study published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Science Genetic,” researchers found  evidence showing the first African arrived in China about 60,000 years ago.  Researcher and population geneticist Li Jin states, “Our work shows that modern humans first came to southeast Asia and then moved later to northern China. This supports the idea that modern humans originated in Africa.”

A 2009 published essay from the “Light Words from the Dark Continent; A Collection of Essays,” by Nibs Ra and Manu Amun, offers insight to early Chinese civilizations.  It states that the first documented governance in China was headed by the Shang or Chiang dynasty in 1500-1000 B.C. King T’ang or Ta, founder of the Shang dynasty, was of African descent.  The Shang were also called Nakhi, which literally means “Black” (Na) and “Man” (khi). King T’ang and the Shang dynasty were responsible for unifying China to form their first civilization.


Ancient Mesopotamia

Many scholars have concluded that the founders of the first Mesopotamian civilization were Black Sumerians. Mesopotamia was the Biblical land of Shinar (Sumer), which sprung up around 3000 B.C.

After deciphering the cuneiform script and researching ancient Mesopotamia for many years Henry Rawlinson (1810-1895) discovered that the founders of the civilization were of Kushite (Cushite) origin. He made it clear that the Semitic speakers of Akkad and the non-Semitic speakers of Sumer were both Black people who called themselves sag-gig-ga or “Black Heads.”

John Baldwin wrote in his book “PreHistoric Nations” (1869): “The early colonists of Babylonia were of the same race as the inhabitants of the Upper Nile.”

This was corroborated by other scholars including, Chandra Chakaberty, who asserted in his book “A Study in Hindu Social Polity” that “based on the statuaries and steles of Babylonia, the Sumerians were “of dark complexion (chocolate colour), short stature, but of sturdy frame, oval face, stout nose, straight hair, full head; they typically resembled the Dravidians, not only in cranium, but almost in all the details.”

Sources:

(PreHistoric Nations by John D. Baldwin, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1869, pg. 192)
(A Study in Hindu Social Polity by Chandra Chakaberty, Delhi: Mittal Publications, 1987, pg. 33)
(From Babylon to Timbuktu by Rudolph R. Windsor. Atlanta: Windsor’s Golden Series, 2203)

http://www.alternet.org

http://www.africaresource.com

http://realhistoryww.com

http://en.wikipedia.org

10

Mohenjo Daro, India

Indus Valley City Puzzles Archaeologists

“The Indus Valley civilization was entirely unknown until 1921, when excavations in what would become Pakistan revealed the cities of Harappa and Mohenjo Daro.

This mysterious culture emerged nearly 4,500 years ago and thrived for a thousand years, profiting from the highly fertile lands of the Indus River floodplain and trade with the civilizations of nearby Mesopotamia.

A well-planned street grid and an elaborate drainage system hint that the occupants of the ancient Indus civilization city of Mohenjo Daro were skilled urban planners with a reverence for the control of water. But just who occupied the ancient city in modern-day Pakistan during the third millennium B.C. remains a puzzle.

“It’s pretty faceless,” says Indus expert Gregory Possehl of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

The city lacks ostentatious palaces, temples, or monuments. There’s no obvious central seat of government or evidence of a king or queen. Modesty, order, and cleanliness were apparently preferred. Pottery and tools of copper and stone were standardized. Seals and weights suggest a system of tightly controlled trade.

The city’s wealth and stature is evident in artifacts such as ivory, lapis, carnelian, and gold beads, as well as the baked-brick city structures themselves.

A watertight pool called the Great Bath, perched on top of a mound of dirt and held in place with walls of baked brick, is the closest structure Mohenjo Daro has to a temple. Possehl, a National Geographic grantee, says it suggests an ideology based on cleanliness

Wells were found throughout the city, and nearly every house contained a bathing area and drainage system.

City of Mounds

Archaeologists first visited Mohenjo Daro in 1911. Several excavations occurred in the 1920s through 1931. Small probes took place in the 1930s, and subsequent digs occurred in 1950 and 1964.

The ancient city sits on elevated ground in the modern-day Larkana district of Sindh province in Pakistan.

During its heyday from about 2500 to 1900 B.C. the city was among the most important to the Indus civilization, Possehl says. It spread out over about 250 acres (100 hectares) on a series of mounds, and the Great Bath and an associated large building occupied the tallest mound.

According to University of Wisconsin, Madison, archaeologist Jonathan Mark Kenoyer, also a National Geographic grantee, the mounds grew organically over the centuries as people kept building platforms and walls for their houses.

“Gradually you have a high promontory on which people are living,” he says.

With no evidence of kings or queens, Mohenjo Daro was likely governed as a city-state, perhaps by elected officials or elites from each of the mounds.

Prized Artifacts

A miniature bronze statuette of a nude female, known as the dancing girl, was celebrated by archaeologists when it was discovered in 1926, Kenoyer notes.

Of greater interest to him, though, are a few stone sculptures of seated male figures, such as the intricately carved and colored Priest King, so called even though there is no evidence he was a priest or king.

The sculptures were all found broken, Kenoyer says. “Whoever came in at the very end of the Indus period clearly didn’t like the people who were representing themselves or their elders,” he says.

Just what ended the Indus civilization—and Mohenjo Daro—is also a mystery.

Kenoyer suggests that the Indus River changed course, which would have hampered the local agricultural economy and the city’s importance as a center of trade.

But no evidence exists that flooding destroyed the city, and the city wasn’t totally abandoned, Kenoyer says. And, Possehl says, a changing river course doesn’t explain the collapse of the entire Indus civilization. Throughout the valley, the culture changed, he says.

“It reaches some kind of obvious archaeological fruition about 1900 B.C.,” he said. “What drives that, nobody knows.””