civic association

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Making your voice heard matters, so make sure you know how to stand out from the crowd and encourage your representatives to really listen. In today’s SPARK episode (link), Jackson Bird shares the tips you need to write letters, make phone calls, and craft social media posts that have a real impact on your representatives at any level of government.

 Today’s challenge? Use the skills you’ve learned to call your congressperson or a town council member and let them know how you feel about an issue that matters to you. If you choose to reach out over social media, be sure tag the HPA in your post, too!

Things we need to stop doing

#1. Treating marriage like it’s a chore

  • You chose to marry this person. If you love them, act like it. Stop giving marriage a negative “civic-duty” association.

#2. Treating education like it’s a business

  • We shouldn’t be sending kids to college so the government can make money. Education is about empowerment of intellect and the quest for knowledge. It should not be dreaded, or given a negative stigma, or used to fuel an economy. We need smart people who can invest their time creating a better future, rather than people worrying how long it’s going to take to pay off their debts.

#3. Treating human life as different or greater than any of life form on this planet

  • Life is life. Humans aren’t special. We just so happen to be the most intelligent life form to evolve on this planet. I can guarantee you there are far more intelligent life forms elsewhere in the universe that would put us to shame. But as the most intelligent species on this planet, we have an objective duty and universal responsibility to preserve and protect lesser life forms.
Having been enslaved for 250 years, black people were not left to their own devices. They were terrorized. In the Deep South, a second slavery ruled. In the North, legislatures, mayors, civic associations, banks, and citizens all colluded to pin black people into ghettos, where they were overcrowded, overcharged, and undereducated. Businesses discriminated against them, awarding them the worst jobs and the worst wages. Police brutalized them in the streets. And the notion that black lives, black bodies, and black wealth were rightful targets remained deeply rooted in the broader society. Now we have half-stepped away from our long centuries of despoilment, promising, “Never again.” But still we are haunted. It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us.
— 

The Case for Reparations by Ta-Nehisi Coates

If you are not reading this, what are you doing.

Having been enslaved for 250 years, black people were not left to their own devices. They were terrorized. In the Deep South, a second slavery ruled. In the North, legislatures, mayors, civic associations, banks, and citizens all colluded to pin black people into ghettos, where they were overcrowded, overcharged, and undereducated. Businesses discriminated against them, awarding them the worst jobs and the worst wages. Police brutalized them in the streets. And the notion that black lives, black bodies, and black wealth were rightful targets remained deeply rooted in the broader society. Now we have half-stepped away from our long centuries of despoilment, promising, ‘Never again.’ But still we are haunted. It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us.
—  Have you read Ta-Nehisi Coates’ brilliant article in The Atlantic, “The Case for Reparations” yet? It’s a long read, but worth every word.