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Hurricane Harvey: What’s Happening & How You Can Help

Resources for those affected and those looking to give.


View this post on our blog to see the embedded tweets.


On behalf of the DoSomething.org staff and our 5.5 million members, we are thinking of everyone affected by Hurricane Harvey and hoping you are safe.

Rescue operations in full swing in Houston as people flee flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey. pic.twitter.com/znCJAJCFQL

— Robert Gauthier (@rgaut999)

August 27, 2017

This man is a preacher checking for people inside cars at 610 & 288 PC Brian Roberson Jr @KPRC2 #Harvey pic.twitter.com/NJx58ZN8N8

— Sara Donchey (@KPRC2Sara)

August 27, 2017

Here is the latest: At least five people are dead, with many more injured and up to 450,000 seeking federal aid, as a result of the hurricane which pummeled southeast Texas over the weekend. With massive damage and dangerous flooding, the people of Houston and surrounding areas need all hands on deck. Here’s how you can find help and how you can help others.

How to Get Help if You’re Affected by the Storm

If you’re in areas hit by the storm, call the US Coast Guard.

Widening #USCG communications for #Harvey rescue ops in #Houston: Call 281-464-(4851)(4852)(4853)(4854)(4855). Get on roofs. Mark locl w/SOS

— U.S. Coast Guard (@uscoastguard)

August 27, 2017


281–464–4851

281–464–4852

281–464–4853

281–464–4854

281–464–4855

You can also visit the City of Houston Emergency site for, among others:

How to Help Those Affected

The orgs below are providing crucial support to those affected. If you have money to give, check out these tips from ProPublica before donating. If you aren’t able to donate, use social media to tell others about these resources.

For more, Vox and The Huffington Post have also compiled resources.


DoSomething.org is the largest tech company exclusively for young people and social change. We’re activating 5.5 million young people (in every US area code and in 131 countries!) to make positive change both online and off.

7

Ai Weiwei’s fences take on borders and belonging in NYC exhibit

The exhibit, which spans the five boroughs, opens to the public on October 12 and is comprised of more than 300 pieces. Like the Robert Frost poem it references, the show examines the tension and contradictions surrounding borders and those excluded by them, inspired by Ai’s concerns about the global refugee crisis and related geopolitical conflicts. Many of the city sites selected by Ai, once a New York immigrant himself, also have close ties to histories of immigration, protest, and free speech.

flickr

Roman Baths - by PapaPiper

10

Naqsh-e Jahan Square - Isfahan, Iran

When Shah Abbas I of the Safavid dynasty moved the capital of Persia to Isfahan in 1598, he decided to completely rebuild the city & poured almost all of the country’s artistic & architectural wealth into it, making it the pinnacle of Safavid Persian art & architecture. This led to the Persian proverb, “Esfahan nesf-e jahan - Isfahan is half the world.” The square became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979.

The square was built between 1598-1629. By building it, Shah Abbas managed to gather the main three components of power in Persia in one place making them easier to control: the power of the clergy represented by the Shah Mosque, the power of the merchants represented by the bazaar, & the power of the monarchy & the Shah himself represented by the Ali Qapu Palace where he lived.

The city has retained much of its former glory with its many beautiful mosques, palaces, bridges, gardens, parks, boulevards, bath houses, minarets, bazaars, & the churches & cathedrals in the historic Armenian quarter.

The Shah Mosque built between 1611-1629 is situated on the south side of the square (1,2,3,4,5,6), the Sheikh Lofollah Mosque built between 1603-1619 on the east side (1,2,3,4,5,6), the Ali Qapu Palace built in 1597 on the west (1), & the Keisaria Gate at the north opens up to the Grand Bazaar.