nytimes.com
Living as a Man, Fighting Breast Cancer: How Trans People Face Care Gaps
CW: problematic wording

A diagnosis of breast cancer at age 27 is shattering for anyone. But for Eli Oberman, it came with extra layers of anxiety. He is a transgender man, who was born female but began taking male hormones when he was 19 to change gender.

Like many transgender people, Mr. Oberman switched gender without having surgery to change his body. The cancer was a stark reminder that he was still vulnerable to illnesses from his original anatomy — and that the medical world has blind spots in its understanding of how to take care of trans men and women.

Was I just nearly attacked?

Monday, 5 December 2016

So, I’m walking across the concourse area of the Downtown Berkeley BART station to take the escalator up to street level. My right knee and left ankle aren’t bothering me too much this morning, and a good thing, too. The person who was just about the get on the escalator before me suddenly stopped and whirled around with an upraised fist. Making eye contact, I headed for a stairwell at the far end of the station.

I would’ve loved if there had been someone with a safety pin nearby, but social justice activists have made it clear that these visible signs of safety for those of us who are marginalized must not be tolerated. Thank you so fucking much people. I feel so much better.

Fucking fix society and fucking start doing so NOW!

9

What Cis People Say To Trans People Vs. What We Hear

By Meredith Talusan and Rory Midhani

TRANSlator 3000: Amazing technology translates cissexist BS!

“Oh you’re trans but you look so good!”
“Trans people are ugly.”

“I’ve never met a trans person before.”
“I assume I can identify any trans person.”

“I would date a trans person.”
“Trans people are usually undateable so I deserve a prize.” 

“You look just like a real woman.”
“Trans women aren’t really women.”

“I’m glad you’re being honest with me about being trans.”
“Trans people who don’t tell me they’re trans are deceivers and liars.”

“I loooooove trans people!”
“I fetishize trans people.”

“It’s so hard to switch pronouns.”
“Trans people are an inconvenience to me.”

“I don’t have a problem with trans people.”
“I have a problem with trans people.” 

LMAO the cis are at it again. It’s been suggested that the facial model for the statue of liberty was a dude and so now all the news orgs are like “is the statue of liberty actually a man?” Well I for one just want to congratulate Lady Liberty on being the largest trans woman in North America if not the world.

  • -support trans women who have pattern baldness and can't wear their hair in "feminine" styles.
  • -support trans women who have sensitive skin and can't shave every day.
  • -support trans women who have pigment allergies and can't wear tons of makeup.
  • -support trans women who have blood disorders and other health problems that make surgery a preventively high risk.
  • -also, support trans women who do not have these problems but still do not feel obligated to live up to your cissexist standards of femininity.
npr.org
California Restaurants Launch Nation's First Transgender Jobs Program
The unemployment rate for transgender people is double that of the general population. A new program aims to change that. It's all because of a trans woman who's employed trans people for years.
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SUBSCRIBE to  Kat Blaque : http://bit.ly/1D3jwSF

Internal Biases are really important to deprogram. Being an ally means having to consciously fight to deprogram these biases that you benefit from that you may not agree with but still have. In conversations about oppression, we should not have to defend you and recentering the conversation on you perpetuates the issue

Watch the Full Video here:

The "born this way" narrative falls apart due to four (4) distinct failures

1. It is not actually an effective argument for dissuading homophobes or transphobes. Take a look at the developmental disability community for some examples of what oppressors do when we’re born this way.

2. It contradicts the idea of actively introspecting to discover your sexual orientation and/or gender identity, invalidating anyone who didn’t just know automatically.

3. It implies that our inability to change is the only good reason to accept us, and by extension implies that we ought to change if we could. Therefore, it actually reinforces that notion that there’s Something Wrong With Us, rather than challenging it.

4. It erases the experiences of people whose queer identities were developed through trauma, who were not in fact born this way.

if you only respect trans people’s genders when they’re good people, that means you don’t really respect trans people’s genders. that’s conditional, and it’s false.

by all means hold racist, misogynist, ableist, abusive, etc trans people responsible for their bigotry but don’t bring their gender into it (unless their gender is part of it, such as a non-native person calling themself two-spirit)

in doing that you reveal that you believe cisness is fundamentally valid whereas transness needs to be earned