cintra wilson

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“My roomate and I had a close encounter with River Phoenix at a near-empty San Francisco airport one night in 1991, right after falling in love with him during a matinee of My Own Private Idaho, and spending the entire drive to SFO inventing lewd slow-jam songs about him. When we saw him, it was as though we’d conjured him by magic. He was unshaven, dressed in sweatpants and a hippie necklace. He gave us a head nod. We nodded back. Once safely out of sight we collapsed onto the airport floor, stifling silent screams and hitting each other until deciding to hide behind a couch and spy on him” - Cintra Wilson, GQ Editor on River.

I like to think of high fashion as what society might look like if aesthetics were prized over military power - what the world would look like if, say, the gently eccentric (if not clinically insane) King Ludwig II of Bavaria had been driven by an ambition to cover the entire world, and not just his own immediate kingdom, with whacked-out fairy-tale castles with rooftop winter gardens, Moorish pavilions, and swan-shaped boats.
—  Fear and Clothing: Unbuckling American Style, Cintra Wilson (pg. 10)

“My roomate and I had a close encounter with River Phoenix at a near-empty San Francisco airport one night in 1991, right after falling in love with him during a matinee of My Own Private Idaho, and spending the entire drive to SFO inventing lewd slow-jam songs about him. When we saw him, it was as though we’d conjured him by magic. He was unshaven, dressed in sweatpants and a hippie necklace. He gave us a head nod. We nodded back. Once safely out of sight we collapsed onto the airport floor, stifling silent screams and hitting each other until deciding to hide behind a couch and spy on him”

- Cintra Wilson, GQ Editor

I think that in America, the libido never gets actually fully separated from the desire for fame. And I think it gets confused with the desire for fame. So you get this sexual awakening, but sexual awakening for us is movies. It’s this rush of first love, and here’s how it’s supposed to be, and it’s supposed to be this golden moment and aaaaaah! Its all part of being famous somehow.

Its that faulty mythology which I think makes everyone miserable…we have this really faulty mythology.

-Cintra Wilson in an interview with Jenny Davidson

This change signifies that Miu Miu is no longer content to be the bratty kid sister of Prada, the elegant snob. Miu Miu wants her own room now; she doesn’t care anymore if Prada thinks she’s tacky. She’s a little overweight and doesn’t give a damn. She knows how to party, defy parental supervision, and skinny-dip in hotel pools.
—  Cintra Wilson, The New York Times