cinderella team

I couldn’t ship Ji Woon and Ha Won until he started doing things out of his feelings for her and not because he’s trying to help Hye Ji and sure enough;

  • Hyun Min went to her graduation because he realized he needed to give her her uniform.
  • Seo Woo went to her graduation because he read evil comments on his instagram and thought something bad was going to happen to her.
  • Ji Woon went to her graduation just because it was her graduation.

See, now we’re getting somewhere.

looking for new blogs to follow!

So my dash is getting a little lacking on the theatre side so if you reblog any of the following, like or reblog this and I’ll check out your tumblr!

  • Newsies
  • Hamilton
  • Next To Normal
  • Book of Mormon
  • Bonnie and Clyde
  • Cinderella
  • Spring Awakening
  • Matilda
  • Les Miserables
  • Starkid productions!
  • Laura Osnes
  • Santino Fontana
  • Laura Benanti
  • Susan Blackwell
  • Jeremy Jordan
  • Lesli Margherita
  • Aaron Tveit
  • Sutton Foster
  • BASICALLY ANYTHING THEATRE RELATED GOES!
Them in a bar...
  • Giles: Wait, I do treat you like an adult!
  • Princess: You made me change my shirt two times before we left the house and forced-fed me a cheese sandwich so I wouldn't get sloppy drunk.
  • Giles: That was just your tutor offering you some fashion tips and advice for casual drinking.
  • Princess: What do you know about fashion?
  • Leo: What do you know about casual drinking?
  • Princess & Leo: [laughs]
Disney Princess Pokemon Go Teams:

Team Valor (ambitious, fierce, family-oriented): Merida, Mulan, Tiana


Team Mystic (wise, fair, patient): Belle, Cinderella, Snow White, Aurora


Team Instinct (free-spirit, peace, curiosity): Pocahontas, Rapunzel, Jasmine, Ariel

Unlikely squad of American Jews are helping Team Israel crush it in the 2017 World Baseball Classic

An underdog team of mostly American Jews representing a country that many of them have never even visited is competing in a world baseball tournament with a fairy-tale winning streak worthy of a Hollywood movie.

Team Israel entered the 2017 World Baseball Classic as an unlikely squad. Out of the 16 nations represented in this year’s contest, Israel was the last to qualify and it’s the only participant not currently in the top 20 in the world rankings.

But the players, clad in blue and white uniforms embroidered with the Israeli flag and a Star of David, have taken the Classic by storm.

All 28 players on Team Israel’s roster are Jewish by heritage, if not by faith as well, but most are from the United States and only one is a native-born Israeli. A loophole within a loophole has made this Cinderella team possible.

The Classic’s “heritage rule” states that any player who qualifies for citizenship in a country is eligible to represent that nation in the quadrennial baseball tournament. And thanks to Israel’s Law of Return, anyone with a Jewish parent, grandparent or spouse can become a citizen.

Similar laws in other countries allowed baseball players to switch sides. In previous years of the Classic, American players Mike Piazza represented Team Italy and Alex Rodriguez played for the Dominican Republic.

With support from “The Mensch on the Bench” mascot, Team Israel defeated South Korea, one of the best international baseball teams, in the Classic’s opening game at Seoul’s Gocheok Sky Dome earlier this week. It was a stunning loss in front of South Korea’s massive home crowd.

“First night was overwhelming. The atmosphere here and the intensity of the game from the very beginning was a lot to take in,” Sam Fuld, a 35-year-old free agent outfielder from New Hampshire, told ABC News on Tuesday.

Team Israel currently has a 3-0 record in this year’s Classic. They will face Cuba on Sunday, the Netherlands on Monday and Japan on Wednesday. If they win two of those games, Israel has a shot at advancing to the semi-finals.

Israel’s team roster includes 20 Major League Baseball-affiliate minor leaguers. It’s not an All-Star team – most of the players have day jobs and no one currently has a big league contract. But there are some prominent names, including 2009 All-Star pitcher Jason Marquis and first baseman Ike Davis, who played for the Yankees this summer. Both are eager to get back into the major league.

“We’re just a group of very hungry players,” 38-year-old pitcher Shlomo Lipetz told ABC News on Friday. “One of the nice things about being an underdog is people don’t have expectations and people are just now starting to realize we’re maybe a better team than what they thought we were. So, that takes a lot of stress off the players.”

Lipetz was born and raised in Israel, making him unique to the team’s roster. His teammate and fellow pitcher Dean Kremer, who was born in the United States, is the only other Israeli citizen. Lipetz said they feel it’s their duty as Israelis to share their experiences with their teammates who are less familiar with the Jewish state, whether it’s speaking in Hebrew or telling a story in the locker room about playing ball in Tel Aviv.

“It’s so special for all the players. They feel this kind of connection being Jewish, this connection of playing for Israel,” Lipetz said.

For the players on Team Israel, it’s more than just winning, Lipetz said. It’s about inspiring Israelis to play the game and winning prize money to fund the development of baseball there. There’s less than 2,000 registered baseball players of all ages in the country and few baseball fields. Lipetz knows this firsthand.

Lipetz, a righty, grew up playing baseball in Tel Aviv on a field he said looked more like a dusty soccer field. After serving in the Israeli Defense Forces, he left to play college baseball in California. He’s the second native-born Israeli to play the game for an American college.

When Lipetz returned to Israel a few years later, the field he played on still didn’t have a real mound. That lack of funding remains an issue today, he said.

“Players still don’t have uniforms or are lacking gloves,” Lipetz told ABC News. “We understand how significant the earnings will be for the baseball program in Israel.”

When he’s not pitching for the Israeli baseball team, Lipetz lives in Brooklyn and works as the vice president of programming at City Winery in Manhattan.

Lipetz didn’t seem nervous about Sunday’s game against Cuba, which has produced some of the best players in the game and where baseball has long been a national obsession.

“We were watching the game in the locker room this morning and we were kind of rooting for Cuba,” he told ABC News. “We think we have what we need to really win the Sunday game and hopefully beyond.”

But no matter what, Lipetz said, “We’re going to have fun.”

ABC News’ Joohee Cho, Jeff Costello, Malorie Cunningham, Catherine Mckenzie, Blair Shiff, Paul H.B. Shin and Justin Tasolides contributed to this report.

IzuAka snippet

here you go incorrectknb


“I was shunned by my teammates for my puns, but I’m glad you absolutely like them!”

Akashi chuckled before giving one of his own. “I once said a pun about all motion stopping, but they gave me an absolute zero.”

Izuki’s eyes brightened. “Ooh, that’s a good one! You know, if our school ever arranges a marathon, it should be called ‘the Seirun’.”

“Our school’s mascot is a racoon— everybody treats it like a real person and even gave it an honorific, calling it 'Raccoon-zan’.”

“Well, what about this? What do you call two mexicans playing basketball? It’s a Juan on Juan!”

“They kicked Cinderella off the basketball team because she ran away from the ball.”

“What part of the gym is never the same? The changing rooms.”

“On the other hand, you have different fingers.”

“What’s a British physicist’s favorite food? Fission chips.”

“Why can’t you trust atoms? Because they make up everything.”

“A steak pun is a rare medium well done.”

“What do you get when you put root beer in a square glass? Beer.”

“Santa’s elves are just a bunch of subordinate clauses.”

“What if there were no hypothetical questions?”

“You know, I’m no photographer, but I can picture us together,” Izuki said as he stepped closer to Akashi. “And people say I’m a pretty puntastic person.”

Akashi also took a step closer. “Then on a scale of one to eagles, how free are you tonight?”

Izuki almost swooned at that.

While the two were exchanging more puns and making goo-goo eyes at each other, the rest of Seirin and Rakuzan were shocked with this sudden development. 

Or was it really far off? They seem to be close because it’s easy for them to relate with one another. Both of them had those freaky eye abilities, the same basketball position, and a lousy sense of humor.

“What the hell,” Hyuuga muttered, summarizing everyone’s reaction about the matter.

ESPN analyst Jay Bilas has a methodical strategy for picking the winner of the NCAA Tournament

(David J. Phillip/AP)
Filling out a NCAA Tournament bracket and predicting winners, upsets, and the ultimate champion has become a passion for college basketball fans and non-fans alike.

While nobody has ever picked a perfect bracket before, ESPN’s college basketball analyst Jay Bilas has an interesting strategy for picking a winner that could help dictate your picks.

In a video for ESPN, Bilas broke down how he chooses the ultimate tournament winner.

First, though it’s fun to pick upsets or a Cinderella team, according to Bilas, no team with a seed line of nine or higher has ever won the NCAA Tournament. You can cross off 36 teams immediately.

Next, Bilas says, the last 13 winners of the tournament have had 25 wins or more when entering the tournament. This year, you can cross off 12 more teams to get down to 20.

From here, it gets a bit more stat-heavy. Bilas likes to look at Rating Percentage Index (RPI), a stat that measures teams’ strength of schedule and how they do against that schedule. While it’s not a perfect stat, according to Bilas, since 1994, 22 of the last 23 national champions have had an RPI of 17 or better. We’re down to 14 teams.

Basketball is obviously a two-way game — teams have to play good offense and defense to win games. Bilas looks at teams who have ranked in the top 20 in adjusted offensive efficiency and top 15 in adjusted defensive efficiency — points scored and allowed per 100 possessions, adjusted for strength of opponent. By filtering out those teams, this year, we’re left with just three contenders: Villanova, Kentucky, and Gonzaga.

Bilas then uses one more criterion to pick a winner: offensive rebounding. As Bilas puts it, “It helps to have a safety net in case shots aren’t falling.” Bilas looks to see which teams have an offensive rebounding rate above 30%. This year, that leaves just one team:

Kentucky.

It’s an imperfect strategy, but it’s methodical and finely tuned and could bear results if you’re looking to win a pool amongst friends, family, or co-workers.

Watch Bilas’ breakdown below:

NOW WATCH: How Michael Jordan — the highest-paid athlete of all time — makes and spends his $1.1 billion



More From Business Insider
ESPN analyst Jay Bilas has a methodical strategy for picking the winner of the NCAA Tournament

(David J. Phillip/AP)
Filling out a NCAA Tournament bracket and predicting winners, upsets, and the ultimate champion has become a passion for college basketball fans and non-fans alike.

While nobody has ever picked a perfect bracket before, ESPN’s college basketball analyst Jay Bilas has an interesting strategy for picking a winner that could help dictate your picks.

In a video for ESPN, Bilas broke down how he chooses the ultimate tournament winner.

First, though it’s fun to pick upsets or a Cinderella team, according to Bilas, no team with a seed line of nine or higher has ever won the NCAA Tournament. You can cross off 36 teams immediately.

Next, Bilas says, the last 13 winners of the tournament have had 25 wins or more when entering the tournament. This year, you can cross off 12 more teams to get down to 20.

From here, it gets a bit more stat-heavy. Bilas likes to look at Rating Percentage Index (RPI), a stat that measures teams’ strength of schedule and how they do against that schedule. While it’s not a perfect stat, according to Bilas, since 1994, 22 of the last 23 national champions have had an RPI of 17 or better. We’re down to 14 teams.

Basketball is obviously a two-way game — teams have to play good offense and defense to win games. Bilas looks at teams who have ranked in the top 20 in adjusted offensive efficiency and top 15 in adjusted defensive efficiency — points scored and allowed per 100 possessions, adjusted for strength of opponent. By filtering out those teams, this year, we’re left with just three contenders: Villanova, Kentucky, and Gonzaga.

Bilas then uses one more criterion to pick a winner: offensive rebounding. As Bilas puts it, “It helps to have a safety net in case shots aren’t falling.” Bilas looks to see which teams have an offensive rebounding rate above 30%. This year, that leaves just one team:

Kentucky.

It’s an imperfect strategy, but it’s methodical and finely tuned and could bear results if you’re looking to win a pool amongst friends, family, or co-workers.

Watch Bilas’ breakdown below:

NOW WATCH: How Michael Jordan — the highest-paid athlete of all time — makes and spends his $1.1 billion



More From Business Insider
10

Elsie Fest 2015 ft. Darren Criss (TV’s Glee and Broadway’s Hedwig and the Angry Inch), Aaron Tveit (Les Miserables 2012 and Broadway’s Next to Normal and Catch Me If You Can), Lea Salonga (Disney’s Mulan and Aladdin, Broadway’s Les Miserables and Miss Saigon), Leslie Odom Jr (Broadway’s Hamilton), Laura Osnes (Broadway’s Cinderella), and Team Starkid, with special guests Neon Trees and Great Big World