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Cincinnati Zoo's Baby Hippo Spending More Time With Parents

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s baby hippo is spending more time with her parents, though a barrier is still kept between them. Video posted on Monday, May 22, shows Fiona interacting with her father, Henry, with the barrier between the two.

Fiona was born six weeks prematurely in January and has been cared for by zoo staff away from her parents. The staff has been slowly reintroducing Fiona to mother Bibi and father Henry with barriers set between them. Slowly, pieces of the barrier have been removed.

“The protective mesh barrier has come down between the stalls, allowing for more physical contact between Fiona and her parents but still ensuring Fiona’s safety by keeping them in separate spaces,” the zoo wrote on Facebook. “Bibi, Fiona’s mom, has spent more time next to Fiona and shows a lot of interest in her.” Credit: Facebook/Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via Storyful

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The @cincinnatizoo welcomes a 6-foot-tall, 100-lb baby giraffe! #giraffe #calf #Cincinnati #zoo #CincinnatiZoo #animals (at Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden)

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Cincinnati Zoo's Baby Hippo Plays With a Box

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens’ baby hippopotamus found a new toy in a video posted on Wednesday, May 17: A box.

“Providing Fiona with a variety of objects gives her the opportunity to use all of her senses — sight, sound, smell, touch, and even taste,” the zoo wrote on Facebook. “Exposing animals to a range of stimuli at a young age makes them more comfortable when they encounter new things as adults.”

Fiona was born six weeks early in at just 29 pounds, well below the normal 55-110 pound birth weight for hippos. A team from the zoo has been caring for her away from her parents — BiBi and Henry — since her birth. Fiona and BiBi have been re-introduced with barriers between the two recently, which have been positive, according to the zoo. Credit: Facebook/Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via Storyful

Cincinnati Zoo's Baby Hippo Swims With Divers

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s baby hippopotamus is preparing to make her outdoor entrance.

The zoo released video on Thursday, May 11, showing Fiona swimming with divers in the indoor pool, which has been completely filled. The zoo’s staff had been slowly raising the pool’s water level to help Fiona learn how to navigate the deeper pool.

The new video shows divers in the pool with Fiona as she dives through the pool and pushes herself to the surface. The zoo said divers may go into the outdoor pool with Fiona, so the staff is acquainting her with the experience. The video shows her slowly adapting to the divers’ presence in the pool.

“Fiona’s care team is trying to introduce new sights and sounds that she might encounter outside so her first experience will be positive and fun,” the zoo said.

Fiona was born six weeks early in January at just 29 pounds, well below the normal 55-110 pound birth weight for hippos. Her weight now tops 200 pounds. She’s been under the care of the zoo’s staff, away from her parents, since her birth, and the care team is preparing her for spending time outside, a reunion with her parents and meeting zoo visitors.

The video at the download link is a shorter version of this video without the captions. We have provided a raw version of this video with its captions below. Credit: YouTube/Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via Storyful

Cincinnati Zoo's Baby Hippo Growing New Teeth

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden’s baby hippopotamus is growing new teeth. The zoo posted video on Wednesday, May 10, showing zookeepers giving Fiona her mouth check and finding new incisor tusks.

Fiona was born six weeks early in January at just 29 pounds, well below the normal 55-110 pound birth weight for hippos. Her weight now tops 200 pounds. She’s been under the care of the zoo’s staff, away from her parents, since her birth, and the care team is preparing her for spending time outside, a reunion with her parents and meeting zoo visitors. Credit: Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden via Storyful

Cincinnati Zoo's Preemie Hippo Dives Deep

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens’ prematurely-born hippopotamus now tops the scales at over 200 pounds as she furthers her progress toward joining her parents in the outdoor enclosure.

The zoo posted video on Friday, May 5, showing Fiona swimming in the indoor pool that is now five-feet deep, a foot deeper than it was a week ago. She is working on mastering her porpoising skills in order to use the deeper outdoor pool.

“Even though hippos spend most of their time in the water, they can’t actually swim,” the zoo said with the new video. “They walk on the bottom when submerged in water and propel themselves to the surface to take a breath. Fiona is learning how to push off the bottom to come up for air.”

The zoo also said earlier this week Fiona now weighs over 200 pounds, on her way to weighing the thousands of pounds an average hippo weighs. The ramp she uses to climb into her pools has been reinforced to support her growing weight.

Fiona was born six weeks early in January at just 29 pounds, well below the normal 55-110 pound birth weight for hippos. She’s been under the care of the zoo’s staff, away from her parents, since her birth, and the care team is preparing her for spending time outside, a reunion with her parents and meeting zoo visitors. Credit: Facebook/Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via Storyful

Get an Underwater View of the Cincinnati Zoo's Baby Hippo Swimming

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens’ baby hippopotamus is swimming closer to outdoor adventures. The zoo released video on Tuesday, April 25, giving an underwater view of Fiona getting used to a deeper pool.

The zoo has been slowly making the indoor adult hippo pool deeper in steps for the prematurely-born Fiona, moving toward her eventual move to an outside pool that is eight to nine feet deep. Right now the pool is three-feet deep, the zoo said, and will be raised to four feet by the end of the week. She will ultimately need to navigate seven-foot deep water in the indoor pool before heading outside.

The video shows Fiona swimming and porpoising, pushing off the bottom like a torpedo across the length of the pool, completing water acrobatics.

Fiona was born six weeks early in January at just 29 pounds, well below the normal 55-110 pound birth weight for hippos. She weighed in at 166 pounds on Friday and turned three months old on Monday. She’s been under the care of the zoo’s staff, away from her parents, since her birth, and the care team is preparing her for spending time outside, a reunion with her parents and meeting zoo visitors. Credit: YouTube/Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Gardens via Storyful

Terrible news.

I happen to live not too far away from the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. I just got word that a gorilla had to be put down for reasons that could have been prevented.

Apparently, a three-year-old child had managed to climb past the exhibit boundaries in the exhibit, and was grabbed by the gorilla. In order to save the boy, the gorilla was shot and killed.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been to that zoo before, and I don’t think a three-year-old would have managed to climb past the boundaries on his own. Regardless if he did or not, the parents are still heavy to blame for this for not being responsible. A wild animal isn’t able to think for itself in situations like that, and at this point, it should be common sense that you shouldn’t let your kids climb around on structures when there are clearly dangerous consequences if not careful.

To make matters worse, the gorilla had just reached its seventeenth birthday. There’s no excuse behind this. Maybe I’m going a little far by adding this, but the parents should be charged for being responsible for the incident.

No charges for mother whose child fell into gorilla exhibit

Cincinnati Enquirer: Officials will not charge the mother of a 3-year-old boy who fell into the Cincinnati Zoo’s gorilla exhibit last month, forcing authorities to shoot the gorilla, a prosecutor announced Monday.

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Photo: A statue of a gorilla and baby at the entrance to Gorilla World at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden has become a memorial for Harambe. (The Enquirer/ Liz Dufour)