christianity buddhism

Friendly reminder that religious gay people exist!! You do not have to choose one or the other! You’re not a bad gay for being religious and you’re not a bad follower for being gay! You can be both! They’re both important parts of your identity and there’s nothing wrong with being both!

To Asexual/Aromantic Girls

You can still be ace/aro and religious. Your God (or Gods) won’t hate you, won’t keep you out of a happy afterlife, and won’t see you as sinners. You’re loved. This goes for Christian girls, Muslim girls, Jewish girls, Pagan girls, Buddhist girls, and Hindu girls ❤

There is a misconception that Buddhism is a religion, and that you worship Buddha. Buddhism is a practice, like yoga. You can be a Christian and practice Buddhism. I met a Catholic priest who live in a Buddhist monastery in France. He told me that Buddhism makes him a better Christian. I love that.
—  Thich Nhat Hanh

Signs that someone has no idea what they’re talking about when it comes to religion:

  • Refers to “Catholics” and “Christians” as if the former isn’t part of the latter
  • Thinks the Council of Nicaea decided what books are in the Bible
  • Says anything about “bronze age fairy tales”
  • Thinks that there are “tens of thousands” of denominations of Christianity
  • Refers unspecifically to all Orthodox Jews as “Hasidic Jews”
  • Thinks Jews use “loopholes” in the Torah to “trick” God
  • Thinks that Salafism/Wahhabism is an “ancient” or “undiluted” form of Islam that’s “stuck in the seventh century”
  • Says Buddhism is “just a philosophy”
  • Thinks that they can practice Buddhism while unthinkingly discarding the religion’s entire metaphysical/cosmological system
  • Thinks that Hindus “worship cows”
  • Thinks that all religions teach that unbelievers will be damned/punished/sent to hell

“There is a misconception that Buddhism is a religion, and that you worship Buddha. Buddhism is a practice, like yoga. You can be a Christian and practise Buddhism. I met a Catholic priest who live in a Buddhist monastery in France. He told me that Buddhism makes him a better Christian. I love that” - Thich Nhat Hanh.

I thought this might be a handy quote for those of you who have been asking whether you can practice Buddhism alongside other religions! 

~Avazen

More actively religious people in fiction pls

And not only white American Christians, I want Muslims, Jews, Buddhist, Hindu(do you say that? I’m unsure), nature religion (it’s maybe called something else in English) and I want religious poc and queers. I want focus on the specific branches on all these religions, not some vague stuff that kinda represent the whole faith. And go more in depth about atheism instead of just saying it’s intelligent people who don’t believe in God. I’m sure there’s even more I just don’t know about.

Religion is a HUGE part of the world but just like poc, queer and disabled people it’s just swept under the rug. Okay, aside from like white Protestantism and Catholicism. Though I even find most of those representations to be pretty weak.

Tho fictional religions are thriving and well.

Please stop erasing or misinterpreting people’s faith. Fiction is supposed to mirror the real world so don’t ignore religion when it’s so important.

I’m sure there’s more aspects to this but alas I’m just a white Mormon. Please add any thoughts and recommend fiction with real world religious aspects if you know any.

Stop Saying Star Wars is Buddhist or Taoist

I watched @attackfish‘s conversation on good/evil dualism in the Star Wars franchise and was amused that her interlocutor was denying such dualism existed in the series. As Fish and I discussed afterward, it is sometimes hard for people who live in a dominant thought system like the Christian duality to recognize that a) they actually subscribe to a very specific and non-universal worldview, and b) this view colors how they view everything else, because that’s what a worldview does.

Fish has a good breakdown in the linked thread on why the Jewish concept of yetzer hara does not map to the Dark Side of the Force as portrayed in the franchise. She also referenced poorly understood Buddhist and Taoist concepts, and as she pointed out, ideas from Buddhism and Taoism used in Star Wars are heavily distorted by a strict moral dualism that is alien to these traditions.

Keep reading

How to be tolerant of others’ religion

There’s a lot of talk on this website on how to be open and accepting to those of different genders, sexualities, and colors, but I rarely see people talking about the differences between religions and how to be open and accepting of those.  So, as a religious person, I thought I’d make this post–also, this post is not just for Christians (real Christians not them Westboro Baptist Church assholes), but for Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, Jews–any religion under the sun.

The most important thing is to remember that what a religious person believes is important to them.  Whether they believe in Jesus or Allah or whomever, that belief is just as important to them as it is for you to believe that the earth is round.  Don’t invalidate someone’s beliefs because you believe differently–and this goes for everyone.  Atheists shouldn’t invalidate Buddhist beliefs, Christians shouldn’t invalidate Muslim beliefs, etc.

Treat everyone’s ways of worship with respect.  If you see someone praying out in the open, don’t shame them.  If you see someone carrying a Holy text around, don’t shame them.  If you hear someone say something religious, don’t shame them.  They have a right to practice their religion, as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone.  Give them that right.  And don’t discriminate because of it.

And lastly, if someone wants to talk about their religion–not trying to convert you, but just bring it up in conversation–don’t shy away from it.  Be open with differing belief systems.  I am a Christian, and my best friend is an Agnostic, and our views about the world are about as different as you can get–but we can still talk about our beliefs with respect for each other.  Don’t make someone’s religion a reason to feel ashamed of themselves.  It’s important to them, possibly the most important thing in their life.  Treat it and them with respect.

tl;dr: treat everyone and their religion with the respect you would want directed at yourself.