christianity

Hello everybody! 

After more than a year of no posts, I am back with my monthly cover page for October. A lot has happened since I posted the last time, but I won’t go into detail about that. Two weeks ago, I started university which is super exciting! From now on, I am studying Special Needs Education (is that the correct term?) at the University of Education in Heidelberg, Germany. That is why I’m reviving my studyblr. Get ready for (hopefully) more posts! ;)                                      Alright, that’s it for now.                                                                                          I hope you’ll have great weekend and a productive week!

Be blessed, Annie 

Religious tolerance and embracing the peoples and cultures of different faiths is not anathema to the spirit of Christianity (even if it goes against a deplorable history of violence and intolerance in the name of the prince of peace), and Christians who insist it is are putting their hatred over an honest consideration of where our faith comes from. Like, the earliest Christian writings and gospels were all syncretic with Judaism, the sacraments and holidays as we know them were inspired by (and sometimes directly based on) pagan rituals, and the life and acts of the Buddha were considered grounds for sainthood.

John 1:12 says, “But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, to those who believe in His name.” When we accept Jesus as our Savior, we’re translated from the dominion of darkness into the Kingdom of God. But it doesn’t end there. We’re not merely citizens of Heaven. We become children of God. He adopts us into His family and puts His stamp of approval on us- the people who used to be His enemies! The hostility that was present before is washed away and we’re given a new identity in Him. I don’t know about you, but that’s pretty mind blowing to me.

Many Catholics are rightfully anxious about Pope Francis. But what he has done in the past five years is arguably small potatoes compared with what Paul VI had the audacity to do: substituting a new liturgy for the ancient Roman Mass and sacramental rites, causing the biggest internal rupture the Catholic Church has ever suffered. This was the equivalent of dropping an atomic bomb on the People of God, which either wiped out their faith or caused cancers by its radiation. It was the very negation of paternity, of the papacy’s fatherly function of conserving and passing on the family heritage. Everything that has happened after Paul VI is no more than an echo of this violation of the sacred temple. Once the most holy thing is profaned, nothing else is safe; nothing else is stable.
—  Peter Kwasniewski, October 12th, 2018 A. D.
  • Someone: Yeah, I take the Bible literally
  • Me: Ahh, so you don't claim any right of private property, you collectivize necessary resources and distribute them to everyone equitably, as any has need? As clearly and obviously commanded in Acts 4?
  • Someone: Okay, maybe not THAT literally. Literally enough where I can erroneously hate gay people and women, but not literally enough where I actually have to be a communist.
  • Me: Ahh

Friendly reminder that “Judeo-Christian” is Not A Thing, as a term it is misleading and offensive to Jews, and should never be used except in the sentence I am currently saying.

You may refer to “Abrahamic religions,” which means Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. If you’re not talking about all three of them, odds are excellent you’re really just talking about Christianity, and should just say so instead of dragging us Jews into it.