christiane-taubira

Women of colour in the French Governement

Christiane Taubira, 62 years old. Born February 2, 1952 in Cayenne (French Guiana).

She was member of european parliament between 1994 and 1999 and also Member of the 1st district of French Guiana between 1993 and 2012. Now, she is the Minister of Justice and Keeper of the Seals since 2012.

She is the origin of the French law of 21 May 2001, which recognizes, as memorial law, the crime against humanity of the slave trade and slavery practiced in the fifteenth century by some people traffickers.

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Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, 37 years old. Born in October 4, 1977 in Beni Chiker in the Rif region in north-eastern Morocco.

She was the Minister of Women’s Rights and Spokeswoman of the Government between 2012 and august 2014. Now she is Minister of National Education, Higher Education and Research.

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Fleur Pellerin (she was adopted, she was born August 29, 1973 under the name of Kim Jong-Suk at Seoul, South Korea) , 41 years old.

Secretary of State for Foreign Trade, Development of tourism and French overseas until august 2014. Now she is Minister of Culture and Communication.

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A Black woman, an Arab woman, and a Asian woman occupying some of the most important positions in the French government. 

As a Black French and having always lived surrounded by people from any ethnic background, and having always advocated gender equality, I’m glad to see finally this diversity is reflected in the government of my country. And here,this is my face when I talk to conservatives, sexists and racists of France:

And for my personal pleasure, I just want to add:

Links(follow):  Around the World-Culture-society-History-Politics .

Congratulations Félicitations to Christiane Taubira, France’s new Minister of Justice:

In an unprecedented move in French politics, three black politicians, two of them women and all from France’s overseas departments in the Caribbean, joined President Francois Hollande’s cabinet as its held its first meeting Thursday.

In the most senior appointment, Christiane Taubira, from French Guiana, has been named minister of justice in the new Socialist government, becoming the first black woman to made a full minister.

Rama Yade, originally from Senegal, had risen to the level of junior minister in the previous Nicolas Sarkozy administration.

Taubira, 60, considered to be on the left of the Socialist Party, is the author of the 2001 “Taubira Law” which officially recognises the slave trade and slavery as crimes against humanity.

More here.

I’d like to hear more about that space to the left of socialism that Ms. Taubira occupies ;-)

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The three stages of Christiane Taubira fangirling (insp.)

Christiane Taubira (born 2 February 1952, Cayenne, French Guiana, France) is a French politician. She’s the current French Minister of Justice. In 2002, she have been candidate for the Presidency. Christiane Taubira also was the driving force behind a 2001 law that recognizes the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as a crime against humanity. Recently, as Minister of Justice, Christiane Taubira introduced what became Law 2013-404, which legalized same-sex marriage in France.


French Minister of Justice Christiane Taubira’s Speech to the National Assembly after the passage of the bill opening marriage and adoption to same-sex couples

Mister President, Mister Prime Minister, Congresswomen and Congressmen,

I must admit that I am overwhelmed by emotion. Still, I hope that I’ll be able to say a few words. I am extremely thankful to the Prime Minister and the President of the Republic for giving us the opportunity to pass this beautiful reform. We passed it with force. We passed it with the constant support of the government. We passed it with your active participation. You all improved this bill. You enriched it. You were there during the long nights of debate. You were there. You were stoic, sometimes in the face of hateful speeches that were against our deeply held values. But there were also great and beautiful expressions of democracy. In the opposition, we had speeches from congresspeople who fought against this bill and who made their firm objections known through their arguments. We are grateful to them as well, because their objections will also be recorded by history.

In passing this law, we know that we built something together. We know that we did not take anything away from anyone. When the first signs of dissent sprung up in society, we asked ourselves questions.  We asked ourselves if our beliefs were enough. We attentively listened to the fears and protests of the opposition. We responded. Lucidly. Clearly. Frankly. And we pointed them towards the content of the bill. We asked ourselves what the most precious things in the lives of heterosexual couples and their families are. And we did not touch those things.

That said, we have improved the exercise of parental authority. We have made it easier to share parental authority. We have protected thousands of children. We have made it easier to maintain the link between children and their parents in the case of conflict between the parents, even outside of the institution of marriage. We have made it easier for future brides and grooms to choose the location of their marriage.

We know that we have not taken anything away from anyone. On the contrary, we have recognized the full rights of our fellow citizens, whose rights were being surreptitiously undermined.

We have granted full rights to all couples.

Without any doubt, the bill that we have passed today is a generous bill. And we are so very thankful.

We also know that we must speak to the men and the women who were hurt in this process by words, gestures or actions. We know that we must tell them that they are fully a part of this society. We know that the responsibility of our public power is to fight against discrimination. Our Republic demands this. Fighting against discrimination means opening equal rights to all of our fellow citizens. It means sharing one of our Republic’s most beautiful institutions with our fellow citizens.

Tonight, we would especially like to speak to the adolescents in our country - boys and girls - who have been hurt during this debate. We speak to those children who found themselves in the midst of deep and frightening chaos. They discovered a society where a wave of selfishness led many to loudly protest against the rights of others.

We simply want to tell these adolescents that they are at home in our society.

We recognize them in this society. We recognize their contradictions, talents, shortcomings, qualities and fragility. These are the things that make each and every one of us unique. Regardless of any sexual issues, each one of us is unique. That is the strength of our society. It is even the basis of our society. It is the basis of our relationship to society. So we tell these adolescents: if you find yourself losing hope, sweep all of those thoughts out of your minds. They are only words. One day they will float away. Stay with us and keep your heads high. You have nothing to be ashamed of. We say that loud and clear, with our all the strength in our voices. As Nietzsche said: Truth kills. And if you repress it, it will kill you. 

Thank you all.

Translated from French by Joseph McShea

Watch on tumblr.playpause.fr

French Minister of Justice Christiane Taubira’s Speech to the National Assembly after the passage of the bill opening marriage and adoption to same-sex couples

Mister President, Mister Prime Minister, Congresswomen and Congressmen,

I must admit that I am overwhelmed by emotion. Still, I hope that I’ll be able to say a few words. I am extremely thankful to the Prime Minister and the President of the Republic for giving us the opportunity to pass this beautiful reform. We passed it with force. We passed it with the constant support of the government. We passed it with your active participation. You all improved this bill. You enriched it. You were there during the long nights of debate. You were there. You were stoic, sometimes in the face of hateful speeches that were against our deeply held values. But there were also great and beautiful expressions of democracy. In the opposition, we had speeches from congresspeople who fought against this bill and who made their firm objections known through their arguments. We are grateful to them as well, because their objections will also be recorded by history.

In passing this law, we know that we built something together. We know that we did not take anything away from anyone. When the first signs of dissent sprung up in society, we asked ourselves questions. We asked ourselves if our beliefs were enough. We attentively listened to the fears and protests of the opposition. We responded. Lucidly. Clearly. Frankly. And we pointed them towards the content of the bill. We asked ourselves what is the most precious things in life are for heterosexual couples and their families. And we did not touch those things.

That said, we have improved the exercise of parental authority. We have made it easier to share parental authority. We have protected thousands of children. We have made it easier to maintain the link between children and their parents in the case of conflict between the parents, even outside of the institution of marriage. We have made it easier for future brides and grooms to choose the location of their marriage.

We know that we have not taken anything away from anyone. On the contrary, we have recognized the full rights of our fellow citizens, whose rights were being surreptitiously undermined.

We have granted full rights to all couples.

Without any doubt, the bill that we have passed today is a generous bill. And we are so very thankful.

We also know that we must speak to the men and the women who were hurt in this process by words, gestures or actions. We know that we must tell them that they are fully a part of this society. We know that the responsibility of our public power is to fight against discrimination. Our Republic demands this. Fighting against discrimination means opening equal rights to all of our fellow citizens. It means sharing one of our Republic’s most beautiful institutions with our fellow citizens.

Tonight, we would especially like to speak to the adolescents in our country - boys and girls - who have been hurt during this debate. We speak to those children who found themselves in the midst of deep and frightening chaos. They discovered a society where a wave of selfishness led many to loudly protest against the rights of others.

We simply want to tell these adolescents that they are at home in our society.

We recognize them in this society. We recognize their contradictions, talents, shortcomings, qualities and fragility. These are the things that make each and every one of us unique. Regardless of any sexual issues, each one of us is unique. That is the strength of our society. It is even basis of our society. It is the basis of our relationship to society. So we tell these adolescents: if you find yourself losing hope, sweep all of those thoughts out of your minds. They are only words. One day they will float away. Stay with us and keep your heads high. You have nothing to be ashamed of. We say that loud and clear, with our all the strength in our voices. As Nietzsche said: Truth kills. And if you repress it, it will kill you.

Thank you all.

Translated from French by Joseph McShea

superselected.com
CHRISTIANE TAUBIRA, FRENCH JUSTICE MINISTER, WHO ONCE SPOKE OUT ABOUT FERGUSON, RESIGNS AMID ANTI-TERRORISM CONTROVERSY.
French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira formally resigned earlier this week amid controversy surrounding a new anti-terrorism proposal. The hotly debated proposal seeks to strip French-born dual nationals of their citizenship if they are convicted of terrorism. Taubira, who hails from French Guiana, has come under fire and endured racist harassment throughout her career for her views on race and justice that have been deemed "divisive" and "extremely leftist." In 2001, she was instrumental in establishing a law that recognized the Atlantic Slave Trade as a Crime Against Humanity. Her proposal for marriage equality in France was known as the “Taubira Law”.
Great Speech by the French Minister of Justice, Christiane Taubira

“Tonight, we would especially like to speak to the adolescents in our country – boys and girls – who have been hurt during this debate. We speak to those children who found themselves in the midst of deep and frightening chaos. They discovered a society where a wave of selfishness led many to loudly protest against the rights of others.

We simply want to tell these adolescents that they are at home in our society.

We recognize them in this society. We recognize their contradictions, talents, shortcomings, qualities and fragility. These are the things that make each and every one of us unique. Regardless of any sexual issues, each one of us is unique. That is the strength of our society. It is even the basis of our society. It is the basis of our relationship to society. So we tell these adolescents: if you find yourself losing hope, sweep all of those thoughts out of your minds. They are only words. One day they will float away. Stay with us and keep your heads high. You have nothing to be ashamed of. We say that loud and clear, with our all the strength in our voices. As Nietzsche said: Truth kills. And if you repress it, it will kill you.”

Speech by the French Minister of Justice, Christiane Taubira, before the French National Assembly, immediately following the final passage of legislation legalizing gay marriages in France.

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Christiane Taubira, from French Guiana, has been named minister of justice in the new French Socialist government. She’s the first black woman to become minister (Rama Yade, originally from Senegal, had been a junior minister in the previous government.) Taubira, who is on the left of the Socialist Party, is the author of a law, now called “Loi Taubira,” voted by the French Parliament in 2001, which recognizes the slave trade and slavery as crimes against humanity.  

She was the first person from the Overseas Department, the first woman, and the first person of color to run for president in 2002. Taubira, 60, a divorced mother of four has a PhD in economics, a BA in sociology, and a degree in African-American studies.

Another woman from the overseas departments, George Pau-Langevin from Guadeloupe—a member of Parliament representing Paris—was named junior minister for educational success. Victorin Lurel, also from Guadeloupe, became minister in charge of overseas departments.

Qu’est-ce que le mariage homosexuel va enlever aux couples hétérosexuels ? (« Rien ! ») S’il n’enlève rien, nous allons oser poser des mots sur des sentiments et des comportements. Nous allons oser parler de mensonges à l’occasion de cette campagne de panique, sur la pseudo-suppression des mots de « père » et de « mère » du code civil et du livret de famille. Nous posons les mots et nous parlons d’hypocrisie pour ceux qui refusent de voir ces familles homoparentales et ces enfants, exposés aux aléas de la vie. Nous posons les mots et nous parlons d’égoïsme pour ceux qui s’imaginent qu’une institution de la République pourrait être réservée à une catégorie de citoyens.


Nous disons que le mariage ouvert aux couples de même sexe illustre bien la devise de la République. Il illustre la liberté de se choisir, la liberté de décider de vivre ensemble. Nous proclamons par ce texte l’égalité de tous les couples, de toutes les familles. Enfin, nous disons aussi qu’il y a dans cet acte une démarche de fraternité, parce qu’aucune différence ne peut servir de prétexte à des discriminations d’État.

—  Christiane Taubira
dailymotion

Magnifique !